Browsing by Subject "hypertriglyceridemia"

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  • Björnson, E.; Packard, C. J.; Adiels, M.; Andersson, L.; Matikainen, N.; Söderlund, S.; Kahri, J.; Hakkarainen, A.; Lundbom, N.; Lundbom, J.; Sihlbom, C.; Thorsell, A.; Zhou, H.; Taskinen, M. -R.; Boren, J. (2020)
    Background Renewed interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins as causative agents in cardiovascular disease mandates further exploration of the integrated metabolism of chylomicrons and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). Methods Novel tracer techniques and an integrated multi-compartmental model were used to determine the kinetics of apoB48- and apoB100-containing particles in the chylomicron and VLDL density intervals in 15 subjects with a wide range of plasma triglyceride levels. Results Following a fat-rich meal, apoB48 appeared in the chylomicron, VLDL1 and VLDL2 fractions in all subjects. Chylomicrons cleared rapidly from the circulation but apoB48-containing VLDL accumulated, and over the day were 3-fold higher in those with high versus low plasma triglyceride. ApoB48-containing particles were secreted directly into both the chylomicron and VLDL fractions at rates that were similar across the plasma triglyceride range studied. During fat absorption, whilst most triglyceride entered the circulation in chylomicrons, the majority of apoB48 particles were secreted into the VLDL density range. Conclusion The intestine secretes apoB48-containing particles not only as chylomicrons but also directly into the VLDL1 and VLDL2 density ranges both in the basal state and during dietary lipid absorption. Over the day, apoB48-containing particles appear to comprise about 20-25% of circulating VLDL and, especially in those with elevated triglycerides, form part of a slowly cleared 'remnant' particle population, thereby potentially increasing CHD risk. These findings provide a metabolic understanding of the potential consequences for increased CHD risk when slowed lipolysis leads to the accumulation of remnants, especially in individuals with hypertriglyceridemia.
  • Ramo, Joel T.; Ripatti, Pietari; Tabassum, Rubina; Soderlund, Sanni; Matikainen, Niina; Gerl, Mathias J.; Klose, Christian; Surma, Michal A.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Pirinen, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Freimer, Nelson B.; Jauhiainen, Matti; Palotie, Aarno; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Simons, Kai; Ripatti, Samuli (2019)
    Background-We asked whether, after excluding familial hypercholesterolemia, individuals with high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) or triacylglyceride levels and a family history of the same hyperlipidemia have greater coronary artery disease risk or different lipidomic profiles compared with population-based hyperlipidemias. Methods and Results-We determined incident coronary artery disease risk for 755 members of 66 hyperlipidemic families (>2 first-degree relatives with similar hyperlipidemia) and 19 644 Finnish FINRISK population study participants. We quantified 151 circulating lipid species from 550 members of 73 hyperlipidemic families and 897 FINRISK participants using mass spectrometric shotgun lipidomics. Familial hypercholesterolemia was excluded using functional LDL receptor testing and genotyping. Hyperlipidemias (LDL-C or triacylglycerides >90th population percentile) associated with increased coronary artery disease risk in meta-analysis of the hyperlipidemic families and the population cohort (high LDL-C: hazard ratio, 1.74 [95% CI, 1.48-2.04]; high triacylglycerides: hazard ratio, 1.38 [95% CI 1.09-1.74]). Risk estimates were similar in the family and population cohorts also after adjusting for lipid-lowering medication. In lipidomic profiling, high LDL-C associated with 108 lipid species, and high triacylglycerides associated with 131 lipid species in either cohort (at 5% false discovery rate; P-value range 0.038-2.3x 10(-56)). Lipidomic profiles were highly similar for hyperlipidemic individuals in the families and the population (LDL-C: r=0.80; triacylglycerides: r=0.96; no lipid species deviated between the cohorts). Conclusions-Hyperlipidemias with family history conferred similar coronary artery disease risk as population-based hyperlipidemias. We identified distinct lipidomic profiles associated with high LDL-C and triacylglycerides. Lipidomic profiles were similar between hyperlipidemias with family history and population-ascertained hyperlipidemias, providing evidence of similar and overlapping underlying mechanisms.
  • Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Packard, Chris J.; Boren, Jan (2019)
    Consumption of fructose, the sweetest of all naturally occurring carbohydrates, has increased dramatically in the last 40 years and is today commonly used commercially in soft drinks, juice, and baked goods. These products comprise a large proportion of the modern diet, in particular in children, adolescents, and young adults. A large body of evidence associate consumption of fructose and other sugar-sweetened beverages with insulin resistance, intrahepatic lipid accumulation, and hypertriglyceridemia. In the long term, these risk factors may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Fructose is absorbed in the small intestine and metabolized in the liver where it stimulates fructolysis, glycolysis, lipogenesis, and glucose production. This may result in hypertriglyceridemia and fatty liver. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intestinal and hepatic fructose metabolism is important. Here we review recent evidence linking excessive fructose consumption to health risk markers and development of components of the Metabolic Syndrome.
  • FinnGen Project; Ripatti, Pietari; Rämö, Joel T.; Mars, Nina J.; Fu, Yu; Lin, Jake; Söderlund, Sanni; Benner, Christian; Surakka, Ida; Kiiskinen, Tuomo; Havulinna, Aki S.; Palta, Priit; Freimer, Nelson B.; Widén, Elisabeth; Salomaa, Veikko; Tukiainen, Taru; Pirinen, Matti; Palotie, Aarno; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Ripatti, Samuli (2020)
    Background: Hyperlipidemia is a highly heritable risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). While monogenic familial hypercholesterolemia associates with severely increased CAD risk, it remains less clear to what extent a high polygenic load of a large number of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol (LDL-C) or triglyceride (TG)-increasing variants associates with increased CAD risk. Methods: We derived polygenic risk scores (PRSs) with approximate to 6M variants separately for LDL-C and TG with weights from a UK Biobank-based genome-wide association study with approximate to 324K samples. We evaluated the impact of polygenic hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia to lipid levels in 27 039 individuals from the National FINRISK Study (FINRISK) cohort and to CAD risk in 135 638 individuals (13 753 CAD cases) from the FinnGen project (FinnGen). Results: In FINRISK, median LDL-C was 3.39 (95% CI, 3.38-3.40) mmol/L, and it ranged from 2.87 (95% CI, 2.82-2.94) to 3.78 (95% CI, 3.71-3.83) mmol/L between the lowest and highest 5% of the LDL-C PRS distribution. Median TG was 1.19 (95% CI, 1.18-1.20) mmol/L, ranging from 0.97 (95% CI, 0.94-1.00) to 1.55 (95% CI, 1.48-1.61) mmol/L with the TG PRS. In FinnGen, comparing the highest 5% of the PRS to the lowest 95%, CAD odds ratio was 1.36 (95% CI, 1.24-1.49) for the LDL-C PRS and 1.31 (95% CI, 1.19-1.43) for the TG PRS. These estimates were only slightly attenuated when adjusting for a CAD PRS (odds ratio, 1.26 [95% CI, 1.16-1.38] for LDL-C and 1.24 [95% CI, 1.13-1.36] for TG PRS). Conclusions: The CAD risk associated with a high polygenic load for lipid-increasing variants was proportional to their impact on lipid levels and partially overlapping with a CAD PRS. In contrast with a PRS for CAD, the lipid PRSs point to known and directly modifiable risk factors providing additional guidance for clinical translation.