Browsing by Subject "indirect effects"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-3 of 3
  • Miller, Kirsten E.; Aguilera, Guillermo; Bommarco, Riccardo; Roslin, Tomas (2021)
    Arthropod communities dwelling in adjacent habitats are able to impact one another via shared natural enemies. In agricultural landscapes, drastic differences in resource availability between crop and non-crop habitats cause variation in insect herbivore densities over short distances, potentially driving inter-habitat effects. Moreover, the composition of the landscape in which the habitats are embedded likely affects realised attack rates from natural enemies via impacts on local arthropod community structure. Here, we examine indirect effects between herbivore species within and between habitat types by calculating the potential for apparent competition between multiple populations. Firstly, we aim to determine how disparities in resource availability impact the strength of the potential for apparent competition occurring between habitats, secondly to examine the impact of landscape composition upon these effects, and finally to couch these observations in reality by investigating the link between the potential for apparent competition and realised attack rates. We used DNA metabarcoding to characterise host-parasitoid interactions within two habitat types (with divergent nutrient inputs) at 11 locations with variable landscape composition within an agroecosystem context. We then used these interaction networks to estimate the potential for apparent competition between each host pair and to compare expected versus realised attack rates across the system. Shared natural enemies were found to structure host herbivore communities within and across habitat boundaries. The size of this effect was related to the resource availability of habitats, such that the habitat with high nutrient input exerted a stronger effect. The overall potential for apparent competition declined with increasing land-use intensity in the surrounding landscape and exhibited a discernible impact on realised attack rates upon herbivore species. Thus, our results suggest that increasing the proportion of perennial habitat in agroecosystems could increase the prevalence of indirect effects such as apparent competition among insect herbivore communities, potentially leading to enhanced population regulation via increased attack rates from natural enemies like parasitoid wasps.
  • Li, Xiaofei; Zhong, Zhiwei; Sanders, Dirk; Smit, Christian; Wang, Deli; Nummi, Petri; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ling; Zhu, Hui; Hassan, Nazim (2018)
    While positive interactions have been well documented in plant and sessile benthic marine communities, their role in structuring mobile animal communities and underlying mechanisms has been less explored. Using field removal experiments, we demonstrated that a large vertebrate herbivore (cattle; Bos tarurs) and a much smaller invertebrate (ants; Lasius spp.), the two dominant animal taxa in a semi-arid grassland in Northeast China, facilitate each other. Cattle grazing led to higher ant mound abundance compared with ungrazed sites, while the presence of ant mounds increased the foraging of cattle during the peak of the growing season. Mechanistically, these reciprocal positive effects were driven by habitat amelioration and resource (food) enhancement by cattle and ants (respectively). Cattle facilitated ants, probably by decreasing plant litter accumulation by herbivory and trampling, allowing more light to reach the soil surface leading to microclimatic conditions that favour ants. Ants facilitated cattle probably by increasing soil nutrients via bioturbation, increasing food (plant) biomass and quality (nitrogen content) for cattle. Our study demonstrates reciprocal facilitative interactions between two animal species from phylogenetically very distant taxa. Such reciprocal positive interactions may be more common in animal communities than so far assumed, and they should receive more attention to improve our understanding of species coexistence and animal community assembly.
  • Mantzouki, Evanthia; Lurling, Miquel; Fastner, Jutta; Domis, Lisette de Senerpont; Wilk-Wozniak, Elzbieta; Koreiviene, Judita; Seelen, Laura; Teurlincx, Sven; Verstijnen, Yvon; Krzton, Wojciech; Walusiak, Edward; Karosiene, Jurate; Kasperoviciene, Jurate; Savadova, Ksenija; Vitonyte, Irma; Cillero-Castro, Carmen; Budzynska, Agnieszka; Goldyn, Ryszard; Kozak, Anna; Rosinska, Joanna; Szelag-Wasielewska, Elzbieta; Domek, Piotr; Jakubowska-Krepska, Natalia; Kwasizur, Kinga; Messyasz, Beata; Pelechata, Aleksandra; Pelechaty, Mariusz; Kokocinski, Mikolaj; Garcia-Murcia, Ana; Real, Monserrat; Romans, Elvira; Noguero-Ribes, Jordi; Parreno Duque, David; Fernandez-Moran, Elisabeth; Karakaya, Nusret; Haggqvist, Kerstin; Demir, Nilsun; Beklioglu, Meryem; Filiz, Nur; Levi, Eti E.; Iskin, Ugur; Bezirci, Gizem; Tavsanoglu, Ulku Nihan; Ozhan, Koray; Gkelis, Spyros; Panou, Manthos; Fakioglu, Ozden; Yang, Yang; Salmi, Pauliina; Arvola, Lauri (2018)
    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI) increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains.