Browsing by Subject "institutional change"

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  • van Wijk, Jakomijn J.; Stam, Wouter; Elfring, Tom; Zietsma, Charlene; den Hond, Frank (Academy of Management, 2013)
  • Kauko, Jaakko (2014)
    Taking complexity as an epistemic starting point, this article enhances understanding of dynamics in higher education. It also reviews the relevant literature on path dependency, complexity research, and studies of political change and contingency. These ideas are further developed with reference to the political situation and political possibilities as concepts. It is claimed that the key issues in understanding irreversibility on a system level are institutional change and politicisation. It is deduced from two case studies in the Finnish context that founding new institutions created bifurcations in both. Then again, the politicisation for disbanding existing institutions has proved rather futile. The key findings are that the choices in higher education politics increase the complexity of the system, and that many of the choices made are irreversible for reasons to do with contingency.
  • Munck af Rosenschold, Johan (2019)
    The study of short-term projects to implement policy has lately gained ground among scholars of environmental governance and public administration. The increasing reliance on and prevalence of projects, or ‘projectification’, has spurred critical debates on the ability of projects to contribute to long-term goals, including sustainability, as well as institutional change. Yet, the literature on projectification lacks specificity in terms of how projects are understood, how the relationship between projects and permanent organizations looks like, and how projects can influence institutional orders. The aim of this paper is to systematize the literature in order to uncover the process of transforming project outputs into institutional change. Three models of projectified governance – mechanistic, organic, and adaptive – is presented, providing a conceptual apparatus that advances the study of projects in environmental policy and governance. The paper argues that the adaptive model, with its reliance on multi-scalar networks for the coordination of project activities and knowledge, shows most promise in achieving institutional change to address complex environmental problems.
  • Riley, Anna (2006)
    The institution of diplomacy in its traditional form has found itself challenged in recent decades. The forces of both globalization and regionalisation have placed new demands upon diplomats, who are now required to balance their work against that of a plethora of new actors operating internationally, and at various levels. The European Union offers an operating environment considerably at odds with the international environment from which the institution of diplomacy developed. The Westphalian state order - a state-centric system where war was perceived as a constant threat - formed the backdrop to the evolution of diplomacy as an institution. Diplomacy became the means to mediate the security threat through inter-state dialogue, conducted by diplomats. The absence of a security threat within the EU today calls into question the role of diplomacy and the career diplomat. No longer required to conduct high-level bilateral negotiations, nor mediate a security threat, the diplomat must adapt to the new working environment and identify new roles and tasks to justify their existence. This thesis studies the changing role of bilateral diplomacy within the EU through the experience of Finland, with the aim of identifying the ways in which Finland's bilateral diplomatic practice vis-a-vis fellow member states has changed since entry to the Union in 1995. The research is conducted primarily in the form of interviews with civil servants and career diplomats, as well as consultation of official foreign ministry documents. The choice of the interview method is largely attributable to the fact that there has been very little study previously conducted on the topic at hand. The material collected is analysed using a theoretical framework rooted in the new institutionalist perspective, and elaborated by Jozef Batora. Two categories are selected that may define the direction that the institution of diplomacy is moving in - a change in diplomacy and a change of diplomacy (metamorphosis) - and the evidence collected through research is analysed according to its relevance to either of these two categories of change. This study covers the experiences of both the foreign ministry (with particular emphasis on the bilateral department and bilateral missions), and the sectoral ministries. The evidence collected indicates that a change in the role of Finland's foreign ministry within the EU context has taken place, in addition to changes in the roles attributed to the diplomats at Finland's bilateral missions. The London embassy is taken as a case study, and demonstrates a focal shift from high-level bilateral negotiations to public diplomacy and cultural work, in the name of lobbying for Finland's broader interests in EU decision-making. The sectoral ministries exhibit a variety of experiences since entry to the EU, but a trend appears to be emerging of a decreasing need for the foreign ministry and the services of its embassies, and a preference at the sectoral ministries for conducting their own bilateral dialogue. The evidence collected through this study suggests that the institution of diplomacy is capable of adaptation, and that adaptive measures are being undertaken, quite feasibly paving the way to an entirely new form of diplomacy within the EU.