Browsing by Subject "intensive care unit"

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  • Marttinen, Maiju (Helsingfors universitet, 2016)
    BACKGROUND: Chloride-rich fluids have been found to associate with an increased risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) among intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Studies evaluating the association of plasma chloride (Cl) with the development of AKI are few. We hypothesized that higher plasma Cl is associated with an increased risk for the development of AKI. METHODS: In this sub-study of the prospective FINNAKI study, we analyzed Cl values measured during ICU stay in two ICUs at a tertiary center including 445 patients. We calculated time-weighted mean values within the first 24h in ICU for plasma Cl (ClTWM 24). We analyzed the association of ClTWM 24 primarily with the development of AKI, and secondarily with 90-day mortality. RESULTS: Based on the first measured Cl value, 350 of 445 patients [78.7 (95 CI, 74.8-82.5)] had hyperchloremia (PCl >106 mmol/L) and 48 [10.8 (95 CI, 7.9-13.7)] severe hyperchloremia (P-Cl > 114 mmol/L). Altogether 217 of 445 [48.8% (95% CI 44.2-53.4%)] patients developed AKI. Of these 217, AKI was diagnosed in 62 (28.6%) after 24h from ICU admission and were included in the analysis regarding development of AKI. ClTWM 24 was associated with an increased risk for the development of AKI (OR1.099; 1.003-1.205) after multivariable adjustments. According to ClTWM 24, no difference in 90-day mortality between severely hyperchloremic patients and others existed. CONCLUSIONS: More than three of four critically ill patients had hyperchloremia and one of ten had its severe form. Higher time-weighted mean chloride was independently associated with an increased risk for AKI.
  • SICS Study Grp; Hiemstra, Bart; Eck, Ruben J.; Wiersema, Renske; Pettilä, Ville; van der Horst, Iwan C. C. (2019)
    Objectives: Caregivers use clinical examination to timely recognize deterioration of a patient, yet data on the prognostic value of clinical examination are inconsistent. In the Simple Intensive Care Studies-I, we evaluated the association of clinical examination findings with 90-day mortality in critically ill patients. Design: Prospective single-center cohort study. Setting: ICU of a single tertiary care level hospital between March 27, 2015, and July 22, 2017. Patients: All consecutive adults acutely admitted to the ICU and expected to stay for at least 24 hours. Interventions: A protocolized clinical examination of 19 clinical signs conducted within 24 hours of admission. Measurements Main Results: Independent predictors of 90-day mortality were identified using multivariable logistic regression analyses. Model performance was compared with established prognostic risk scores using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves. Robustness of our findings was tested by internal bootstrap validation and adjustment of the threshold for statistical significance. A total of 1,075 patients were included, of whom 298 patients (28%) had died at 90-day follow-up. Multivariable analyses adjusted for age and norepinephrine infusion rate demonstrated that the combination of higher respiratory rate, higher systolic blood pressure, lower central temperature, altered consciousness, and decreased urine output was independently associated with 90-day mortality (area under the receiver operating characteristic curves = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.71-0.78). Clinical examination had a similar discriminative value as compared with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score-II (area under the receiver operating characteristic curves = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.73-0.79; p = 0.29) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-IV (using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves = 0.77; 95% CI, 0.74-0.80; p = 0.16) and was significantly better than the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves = 0.67; 95% CI, 0.64-0.71; p <0.001). Conclusions: Clinical examination has reasonable discriminative value for assessing 90-day mortality in acutely admitted ICU patients. In our study population, a single, protocolized clinical examination had similar prognostic abilities compared with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score-II and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-IV and outperformed the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score.
  • Holmström, Ester; Efendijev, Ilmar; Raj, Rahul; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Litonius, Erik; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2021)
    BackgroundCardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. As population ages, the need for research focusing on CA in elderly increases. This study investigated treatment intensity, 12-month neurological outcome, mortality and healthcare-associated costs for patients aged over 75 years treated for CA in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital.MethodsThis single-centre retrospective study included adult CA patients treated in a Finnish tertiary hospital's ICU between 2005 and 2013. We stratified the study population into two age groups: 75 years. We compared interventions defined by the median daily therapeutic scoring system (TISS-76) between the age groups to find differences in treatment intensity. We calculated cost-effectiveness by dividing the total one-year healthcare-associated costs of all patients by the number of survivors with a favourable neurological outcome. Favourable outcome was defined as a cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1-2 at 12 months after cardiac arrest. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent associations between age group, mortality and neurological outcome.ResultsThis study included a total of 1,285 patients, of which 212 (16%) were >= 75 years of age. Treatment intensity was lower for the elderly compared to the younger group, with median TISS scores of 116 and 147, respectively (p
  • Holmström, Ester; Efendijev, Ilmar; Raj, Rahul; Pekkarinen, Pirkka; Litonius, Erik; Skrifvars, Markus (Helsingin yliopisto, 2021)
    Background: Cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. As population ages, the need for research focusing on CA in elderly increases. This study investigated treatment intensity, 12-month neurological outcome, mortality and healthcare-associated costs for patients aged over 75 years treated for CA in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital. Methods: This single-centre retrospective study included adult CA patients treated in a Finnish tertiary hospital’s ICU between 2005 and 2013. We stratified the study population into two age groups: <75 and ≥75 years. We compared interventions defined by the median daily therapeutic intervention scoring system (TISS-76) between the age groups to find differences in treatment intensity. We calculated cost-effectiveness by dividing the total one-year healthcare-associated costs of all patients by the number of survivors with a favourable neurological outcome. Favourable outcome was defined as a cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1–2 at 12 months after cardiac arrest. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent association between age group, mortality and neurological outcome. Results: This study included a total of 1,285 patients, of which 212 (16%) were ≥75 years of age. Treatment intensity was lower for the elderly compared to the younger group, with median TISS scores of 116 and 147, respectively (p < 0.001). The effective cost in euros for patients with a good one-year neurological outcome was €168,000 for the elderly and €120,000 for the younger group. At 12 months after CA 24% of the patients in the elderly group and 47% of the patients in the younger group had a CPC of 1-2 (p < 0.001). Age was an independent predictor of mortality (multivariate OR = 3.36, 95% CI:2.21-5.11, p < 0.001) and neurological outcome (multivariate OR = 3.27, 95% CI:2.12-5.03, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The elderly ICU-treated CA patients in this study had worse neurological outcomes, higher mortality and lower cost-effectiveness than younger patients. Further efforts are needed to recognize the tools for assessing which elderly patients benefit from a more aggressive treatment approach in order to improve the cost-effectiveness of post-CA management.
  • HEALICS Consortium; Keuning, Britt E.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Wiersema, Renske; Pettilä, Ville; van der Horst, Iwan C. C. (2020)
    Background Mortality prediction models are applied in the intensive care unit (ICU) to stratify patients into different risk categories and to facilitate benchmarking. To ensure that the correct prediction models are applied for these purposes, the best performing models must be identified. As a first step, we aimed to establish a systematic review of mortality prediction models in critically ill patients. Methods Mortality prediction models were searched in four databases using the following criteria: developed for use in adult ICU patients in high-income countries, with mortality as primary or secondary outcome. Characteristics and performance measures of the models were summarized. Performance was presented in terms of discrimination, calibration and overall performance measures presented in the original publication. Results In total, 43 mortality prediction models were included in the final analysis. In all, 15 models were only internally validated (35%), 13 externally (30%) and 10 (23%) were both internally and externally validated by the original researchers. Discrimination was assessed in 42 models (98%). Commonly used calibration measures were the Hosmer-Lemeshow test (60%) and the calibration plot (28%). Calibration was not assessed in 11 models (26%). Overall performance was assessed in the Brier score (19%) and the Nagelkerke's R-2 (4.7%). Conclusions Mortality prediction models have varying methodology, and validation and performance of individual models differ. External validation by the original researchers is often lacking and head-to-head comparisons are urgently needed to identify the best performing mortality prediction models for guiding clinical care and research in different settings and populations.
  • Kortelainen, Simon (Helsingin yliopisto, 2021)
    Background and purpose: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, but studies on the cost-effectiveness of intensive care are lacking. We aimed to evaluate the one-year costs and outcomes of patients with AIS treated in the intensive care unit (ICU). Materials and methods: We conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted to an academic ICU with AIS between 2003 and 2013. True healthcare expenditure was obtained up to one year after admission. Patient outcome was 12-month functional outcome and mortality. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify independent predictors of favorable outcomes and linear regression analysis to assess factors associated with costs. We calculated the effective cost per survivor (ECPS) and effective cost per favorable outcome (ECPFO). Results: The study population comprised 154 patients. ICU admission was mostly due to decreased consciousness level (47%) and need for respiratory support (40%). There were 68 (44%) one year survivors, of which 27 (18%) had a favorable outcome. High age (odds ratio [OR] 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91–0.98) and high hospital admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87–0.97) were independent predictors of poor outcomes. Increased age had a cost ratio of 0.98 (95% CI 0.97–0.99) per added year. The ECPS and ECPFO were 115,628€ and 291,210€ respectively. Conclusions: Treatment of AIS in the ICU appears costly, and the outcome is often poor. Further research is required to improve the cost-effectiveness of ICU care for AIS patients.
  • Saku, S. A.; Linko, R.; Madanat, R. (2020)
    Background and Aims: Emergency Response Teams have been employed by hospitals to evaluate and manage patients whose condition is rapidly deteriorating. In this study, we aimed to assess the outcomes of triggering the Emergency Response Teams at a high-volume arthroplasty center, determine which factors trigger the Emergency Response Teams, and investigate the main reasons for an unplanned intensive care unit admission following Emergency Response Team intervention. Material and Methods: We gathered data by evaluating all Emergency Response Team forms filled out during a 4-year period (2014-2017), and by assessing the medical records. The collected data included age, gender, time of and reason for the Emergency Response Teams call, and interventions performed during the Emergency Response Teams intervention. The results are reported as percentages, mean +/- standard deviation, or median (interquartile range), where appropriate. All patients were monitored for 30 days to identify possible intensive care unit admissions, surgeries, and death. Results: The mean patient age was 72 (46-92) years and 40 patients (62%) were female. The Emergency Response Teams was triggered a total of 65 times (61 patients). The most common Emergency Response Team call criteria were low oxygen saturation, loss or reduction of consciousness, and hypotension. Following the Emergency Response Team call, 36 patients (55%) could be treated in the ward, and 29 patients (45%) were transferred to the intensive care unit. The emergency that triggered the Emergency Response Teams was most commonly caused by drug-related side effects (12%), pneumonia (8%), pulmonary embolism (8%), and sepsis (6%). Seven patients (11%) died during the first 30 days after the Emergency Response Teams call. Conclusion: Although all 65 patients met the Emergency Response Teams call criteria, potentially having severe emergencies, half of the patients could be treated in the arthroplasty ward. Emergency Response Team intervention appears useful in addressing concerns that can potentially lead to unplanned intensive care unit admission, and the Emergency Response Teams trigger threshold seems appropriate as only 3% of the Emergency Response Teams calls required no intervention.
  • Mikkonen, Era D.; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Reinikainen, Matti; Bendel, Stepani; Laitio, Ruut; Hoppu, Sanna; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Karppinen, Atte; Raj, Rahul (2020)
    Objective Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a well-described complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The majority of the available data regarding PTE stem from the adult population. Our aim was to identify the clinical and radiological risk factors associated with PTE in a pediatric TBI population treated in an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We used the Finnish Intensive Care Consortium database to identify pediatric ( Results Of the 290 patients included in the study, 59 (20%) developed PTE. Median age was 15 years (interquartile range [IQR] 13-17), and 80% had an admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score Significance We showed that PTE is a common long-term complication after ICU-treated pediatric TBI. Higher age, moderate injury severity, obliterated suprasellar cisterns, seizures during ICU stay, and surgical treatment are associated with an increased risk of PTE. Further studies are needed to identify strategies to decrease the risk of PTE.
  • Raj, Rahul; Bendel, Stepani; Reinikainen, Matti; Hoppu, Sanna; Luoto, Teemu; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Tetri, Sami; Laitio, Ruut; Koivisto, Timo; Rinne, Jaakko; Kivisaari, Riku; Siironen, Jari; Higgins, Alisa; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2018)
    Objective: To assess temporal trends in 1-year healthcare costs and outcome of intensive care for traumatic brain injury in Finland. Design: Retrospective observational cohort study. Setting: Multicenter study including four tertiary ICUs. Patients: Three thousand fifty-one adult patients (>= 18 yr) with significant traumatic brain injury treated in a tertiary ICU during 2003-2013. Intervention: None. Measurements and Main Results: Total 1-year healthcare costs included the index hospitalization costs, rehabilitation unit costs, and social security reimbursements. All costs are reported as 2013 U.S. dollars ($). Outcomes were 1-year mortality and permanent disability. Multivariate regression models, adjusting for case-mix, were used to assess temporal trends in costs and outcome in predefined Glasgow Coma Scale (3-8, 9-12, and 13-15) and age (18-40, 41-64, and >= 65 yr) subgroups. Overall 1-year survival was 76% (n = 2,304), and of 1-year survivors, 37% (n = 850) were permanently disabled. Mean unadjusted 1-year healthcare cost was $39,809 (95% CI, $38,144-$41,473) per patient. Adjusted healthcare costs decreased only in the Glasgow Coma Scale 13-15 and 65 years and older subgroups, due to lower rehabilitation costs. Adjusted 1-year mortality did not change in any subgroup (p <0.05 for all subgroups). Adjusted risk of permanent disability decreased significantly in all subgroups (p <0.05). Conclusion: During the last decade, healthcare costs of ICU-admitted traumatic brain injury patients have remained largely the same in Finland. No change in mortality was noted, but the risk for permanent disability decreased significantly. Thus, our results suggest that cost-effectiveness of traumatic brain injury care has improved during the past decade in Finland.
  • Schefold, Joerg C.; Bäcklund, Minna; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Zuercher, Patrick; Mukherjee, Rajat; Mistry, Satish; Mayer, Stephan A.; Dziewas, Rainer; Bakker, Jan; Jakob, Stephan M. (2020)
    Introduction: Post-extubation dysphagia is commonly observed in ICU patients and associated with increased aspiration rates, delayed resumption of oral intake/ malnutrition, prolonged ICU and hospital length of stay, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality. Conventional therapeutic approaches are limited. Pharyngeal electrical stimulation (PES) was previously shown to improve swallowing function and airway safety in severely dysphagic tracheostomised stroke patients. Methods: In a multi-center, single-blind, 1:1 randomized controlled study, up to 400 (360 evaluable) mixed emergency adult ICU patients with recent extubation following mechanical ventilation and confirmed oropharyngeal dysphagia will be enrolled at investigational academic ICUs. Primary objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of PES in reducing the severity of unsafe swallows. Patients will be randomized to receive PES (or sham) treatment on 3 consecutive days in addition to best supportive care. Primary endpoint is a composite of 2 endpoints with hierarchy based on clinical priorities: 1) Swallowing safety based on worst penetration-aspiration-scale (PAS) score in series of up to 4 boli using thin stimuli approx. From 24 to 60 hours after treatment completion, converted to a trichotomized ordinal response of safe (PAS 1-3), penetration (PAS 4-5), or aspiration (PAS 6-8). 2) Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale scores determined by bedside assessment 7 +/- 1 days after treatment completion. Oropharyngeal dysphagia will be assessed by Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing by blinded study staff. Patients will be followed-up for a maximum of 90 days. Discussion: This study will evaluate the effects of PES on swallowing safety in critically ill ICU patients post mechanical ventilation with oropharyngeal dysphagia.