Browsing by Subject "knowledge creation"

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  • Lahti, Henna; Fernström, Päivi (2021)
    Our aim in this article is to introduce the idea of ‘crafticulation’ as a part of scientific method and to present a case study related to it. A novel course, Materializing in Craft Science, was offered in the first year of the craft teacher master’s degree at the University of Helsinki. The aim of the course was to pilot a method of crafticulation by materializing theoretical mind maps. Crafticulation consists of the words, ‘craft’ and ‘articulation’ and further, crafticulation is seen as a part of practice-led research in which craft plays a key role in eliciting a wide spectrum of knowledge. Our research question is how crafticulation emerged in students’ inquiry processes. The research data included twenty individual mind maps, materializations and reflections of the course. Based on theory-driven data analysis, the results indicated that many students used crafticulation for demonstration purposes. For example, they tested the connection between their craft-making process and well-being. Another approach was to convey a certain experience by way of crafticulation. In some cases, crafticulation was linked to analogies and metaphors in learning theoretical concepts. Furthermore, the students found new avenues in which to reflect research topics and to deepen their inquiry processes.
  • Lahti, Henna; Fernström, Päivi (2021)
    Our aim in this article is to introduce the idea of ‘crafticulation’ as a part of scientific method and to present a case study related to it. A novel course, Materializing in Craft Science, was offered in the first year of the craft teacher master’s degree at the University of Helsinki. The aim of the course was to pilot a method of crafticulation by materializing theoretical mind maps. Crafticulation consists of the words, ‘craft’ and ‘articulation’ and further, crafticulation is seen as a part of practice-led research in which craft plays a key role in eliciting a wide spectrum of knowledge. Our research question is how crafticulation emerged in students’ inquiry processes. The research data included twenty individual mind maps, materializations and reflections of the course. Based on theory-driven data analysis, the results indicated that many students used crafticulation for demonstration purposes. For example, they tested the connection between their craft-making process and well-being. Another approach was to convey a certain experience by way of crafticulation. In some cases, crafticulation was linked to analogies and metaphors in learning theoretical concepts. Furthermore, the students found new avenues in which to reflect research topics and to deepen their inquiry processes.
  • Hussi, Tomi (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2005)
    Economics and Society
    This study explores the relationship between Intellectual Capital and Maintenance of Work Ability. Intellectual Capital is the central framework for analysing the increasing knowledge-intensiveness of business life. It is characteristic of Intellectual Capital that the intersection of human capital, internal structures and external structures is essential. Maintenance of Work Ability, on the other hand, has been the leading paradigm for Finnish occupational health and safety activities since the late 1980s. It is also a holistic approach that emphasises the interdependence of competence, work community, work environment and health as the key to work-related wellbeing. This thesis consists of five essays that scrutinise the focal phenomena both theoretically and empirically. The conceptual model that results from the first research essay provides a general framework for the whole thesis. The case study in the second essay supports a division of intangible assets into generative and commercially exploitable intangibles introduced in the first essay and further into the primary and secondary dimension of generative intangibles. Further scrutiny of the interaction of generative intangible assets in essay three reveals that employees’ wellbeing enhances the readiness to contribute to the knowledge creation process. The fourth essay shows that the MWA framework could benefit knowledge-intensive work but this would require a different approach than has been commonly adopted in Finland. In essay five, deeper analysis of the MWA framework shows that its potential results from comprehensive support of the functioning of an organisation. The general conclusion of this thesis is that organisations must take care of their employees’ wellbeing in order to secure innovativeness that is the key to surviving in today’s competitive business environment.
  • Karlgren, Klas; Paavola, Sami; Ligorio, Maria Beatrice (2020)
    New kinds of jobs require managing new kinds of work life compe-tences and a number of such key competences for lifelong learningwhich equip young people for further learning and employability ina knowledge society have already been identified. Research hashowever indicated that formal education is not providing adequatesupport and opportunities for acquiring the needed competenciesin practice. More discussion and empirical research is needed aboutknowledge work competences and related practices in secondaryschools, higher education and in the work life. The theme of thisspecial Issue is‘Knowledge work: educational practices preparingstudents for work life’and it has as its aim to contribute toa discussion on how changes in professional work can be takeninto account in educational settings. Of particular interest in thisspecial issue is how educational theory about‘knowledge-creation’is applied in practice. The trialogical approach to learning highlightscollaborative knowledge creation and the development of shared,mediating objects. This theory and its associated design principlesare introduced. The contributions of this special issue relate toimplementing ideas of the trialogical approach to learning in var-ious ways and each contribution is briefly presented.
  • Muukkonen, Hanni; Lakkala, Minna; Kaistinen, Jyrki; Nyman, Göte (2010)
  • Hughes, Janette, M.; Morrison, Laura, J.; Kajamaa, Anu; Kumpulainen, Kristiina (Springer, 2019)
    Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering
    Despite the growing popularity of makerspaces in education, we currently have little understanding of the conditions and processes that promote students’ design thinking and knowledge creation in these digitally-enriched learning environments. To address these research gaps in current research knowledge, we draw on two ethnographic case studies on students’ maker activities situated in Canada and Finland. In the Canadian study, the focus is directed to analysing students’ design actions carried out in a five day long “microcycle” of learning by individual students in a Maker Lab. In the Finnish study, attention is directed to investigating forms of students’ collective knowledge creation during an elective course in a makerspace, The Fuse Studio. This paper shows that design thinking is a potentially fruitful way to build students’ global competencies and to approach knowledge creation in a makerspace environment as students engage in interest-driven making, requiring various levels of instructor/peer support, from independent making to guided inquiry.
  • Helin, Satu (Helsingin yliopisto, 2019)
    Higher education in Finland is expected to provide innovation activities for their students; this is indicated by the Ministry of Education and Culture in their national vision of transition to working life. Changes in work-life are affecting in the whole society in Finland calling for non-routine problem solving, multi-professional collaboration, and knowledge creation. Co-operation between higher education institutions and business life is expected to extend and there is an increasing demand of entrepreneurial skills. In my research context, the innovation activity is provided by facilitation organisation which is a link between all actors. Organisations and companies set complex challenges; then groups of higher education students ideate and create solutions for those demands. The data for this study was collected through ethnographic observations and interviews. The process of observations took several months; I observed groups to obtain information of successes and challenges among the multidisciplinary collaborations. Observations were accomplished at joint events and while students were working as small units. At the end of the project I interviewed students from observed groups individually. In addition, two facilitators and one counselor from partner organisation was interviewed. Throughout the whole research process I wrote notes to my research diary. The initial interest of my study focused on the use of the discipline based languages. Commonly, people from different disciplines are assumed to communicate with different terms and words; challenges in separate epistemic vocabularies are expected to influence to the process of collaboration. Nevertheless, the data in this research showed that the discipline based differences in language are only one challenge among others. The participants in this research described challenges and successful of communication and group work habits. My research highlights the importance of open-minded knowledge seeking and knowledge creating. Two groups and their approaches to this collaboration are compared. One group utilised an approach of collaborative knowledge creation, whereas, another one used a practice of subtasks which were performed individually. Innovation projects require the ability to collaborate, including both sharing own expertise and relying on skills and knowledge of others. The data illustrated how groups operated. On the basis of the research data, the objects of their actions were analysed, and I located the groups in the trading zone dimensions.
  • Weckström, Marika (Helsingin yliopisto, 2016)
    Teamwork as a method is very common among employees. Working together and achieving goals craves a lot of communication and knowledge sharing among colleagues. When working with people, it is fact that there are many different personalities and communication habits. Purpose of this study was to examine how knowledge is created in teamwork. The process of the knowledge creation was examined through communication and knowledge sharing among team members. Purpose of this study was to bring up the problem points in this team and through that develop knowledge sharing and make teamwork more effective. The theoretical framework of this study concentrates to examine Nonaka and Takeuchi's (1995) theory of knowledge creation through knowledge conversion, but phenomenon is examined also through other researchers point of view. Results are viewed through this knowledge conversion model. The data was collected from one company's team in October-November 2015. Team members answered to a questionnaire and wrote down memories about their knowledge sharing. I also interviewed eight team members and observed two team meetings. In this team they are communicating a lot, but still there are problems with the knowledge sharing. Team is split in to two different teams, where only one half gets all the information and also shares it. Part of the team members feels that they cannot openly communicate with other team members and cannot bring up development ideas, which affects to knowledge creation. The results show that there is problem with the knowledge sharing between researcher and some research assistants.