Browsing by Subject "labeling"

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  • Christensen, Tue; Nielsen, Cecilie Wirenfeldt; Valsta, Liisa; Aalto, Sanni; Haario, Peppi; Reinivuo, Heli; Virtanen, Suvi; Pastell, Helena; Nieminen, Janne; Reykdal, Ólafur; Axelsson, Cecilia; Petrelius-Sipinen, Jessica; Kielland, Ellen; Østerholt Dalane, Jorån; Hauger Carlsen, Monica; Salupuu, Kristin; Jõgi, Änn (Nordic Council of Ministers, 2020)
    TemaNord
    This report describes the activities of two projects that were carried out using the infrastructure of the Nordic Food Analysis Network, i.e. the ‘Nordic Food Composition Data for Labelling (NordCoLa)’ project carried out between 2018 and 2020, and the preceding project ‘Fostering the quality and use of Nordic food composition data’, carried out under the Finnish Presidency of the NCM in 2016. The primary aim of the NordCoLa project was to evaluate the needs, synergies and critical points of the Nordic FCDBs (e.g. food ingredient and nutrient value gaps) in relation to the composition data to be used to implement the new European nutrient labelling legislation. This was to ensure quality food composition data in the Nordic countries for food producers and other users for nutrient labelling purposes. The most important gaps were evaluated and summarised by this project. This project included an exercise comparing calculated and analysed nutrient information of selected Nordic food samples. This information was then compared with the acceptable tolerance limits in use in the EU. As part of the projects, two open seminars were organised in Helsinki; the first one on 16 October 2016 and the second on 17 April 2019. The seminars gathered a total of around 150 participants together to hear about challenges in the area of food composition data and their use in food labelling and related quality issues. In addition, the project included research on food label information in order to evaluate the usefulness of the Mintel Global New Products’ Database (Mintel GNPD) and GS1 in the work of updating and compiling information used in food composition databases. The network’s main conclusions and strategical proposals are as follows: • There is a need for more analyses and continuous compiling work in order to ensure updated FCDBs for the users. Opportunities for Nordic collaboration in food analyses should be carefully evaluated. • More industrial ingredients need to be analysed and added to FCDBs. Obtaining such information is important to keep the databases useful, especially for SMEs in the food business. • The calculated values are of overall good quality when compared with analysed values, with the exception of protein, sugars and salt. This warrants more attention to take carbohydrates and especially simple sugars into account when planning future national food analysis programmes. Collecting more information on salt content and comparing it with the analysed information on food products is also needed. • There is no legislation for the methods to be used in the food analysis. This means that different methods are used and even different components may be measured resulting variation in nutrient contents. Sugars are an example of that, since different techniques measure total sugar content or different 7 sugar components separately and both ways are accepted for labelling purposes. • Calculating nutrient contents of food items according to a standardised method is a good and affordable way of producing values for food composition databases and food labelling purposes, if the data quality of the FCDBs are based on analysed values. • The acceptable variation in nutrient label information based on EC legislation tolerances is very large. The tolerances may even threaten the meaningful reformulation of food products and reliable consumer information due to uncertainties over the labelled nutrient values. • More information is needed regarding the validity of nutrient labelling at the Nordic and European level. To avoid misleading consumer information, food analyses should be used to check the validity of nutrient labelling and to monitor reformulation efforts. • Nutrient label data from commercial food label databases, for example, is not recommended to be used, in general, for updating nutrient values of foods in the national FCDBs. However, such databases were found to be partially useful in updating the coverage, i.e. food lists of national FCDBs, if the used databases cover most of the national market. • Nordic collaboration should be further intensified in the fields of analysing nutrient content of missing ingredients in FCDBs, harmonising nutrient label calculation procedures and proposing improvements to the European legislation concerning tolerances of nutrient values in labelling.
  • Laurén, Patrick (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    Cellulose has already been used as an industrial raw material for over a century. However, during recent years the nanostructural features of the naturally occurring biopolymer have been fully investigated and characterized through different processing methods as nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC). This has led to a rapid development of novel cellulose based nanoscale materials and advancements in the field of composite materials. NFC offers interesting specific properties that differ from many other natural and synthetic polymers, such as self-renewable raw materials, semi-crystalline morphology, broad chemical modification capacity, biocompatibility and biodegradability. Biocompatibility and the biomimetic aspects of NFC have enabled the fabrication of nanoporous membranes and scaffolds that can function as medical devices (e.g. tissue engineering, wound healing, novel active implants). In this study, the properties of plant-derived NFC, as potential injectable drug releasing hydrogel "implants" were investigated. Three different sized candidate molecules were selected (123I-NaI, 123I-β-CIT and 99mTc-HSA, from small to large respectively) and investigated with the use of a small animal SPECT/CT molecular imaging device. Study compounds were mixed with the NFC biomaterial and injected into the pelvic region of mice. Drug release was observed for a period of 24 hours and the results were compared to saline/study compound control injections. In addition, 99mTc labeled NFC hydrogels were prepared for dual label tracing to observe the hydrogel positioning during the SPECT/CT acquisitions. For the smaller compounds (123I-NaI, 123I-β-CIT), no differences were found in the drug release or absorption in between the NFC biomaterial and saline injections. However, a clear difference was found with the large compound (99mTc-HSA). In the NFC hydrogel, the rate of release was slower and the distribution of 99mTc-HSA was more concentrated around the area of injection. In addition, the NFC hydrogel did not migrate from, or disintegrate, at the site of injection, suggesting a robust enough structural integrity to withstand normal movement and activity. In conclusion, the labeling of NFC was found to be a reliable and simple method. NFC hydrogels have the potential use as drug releasing medical devices with larger compounds. NFC matrix did not have any controlled release effect on the studied small molecules. Therefore further studies are required for more specific conclusions.