Browsing by Subject "land surface temperature"

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  • Aalto, Iris (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    Global warming is expected to have detrimental consequences on fragile ecosystems in the tropics and to threaten both the global biodiversity as well as food security of millions of people. Forests have the potential to buffer the temperature changes, and the microclimatic conditions below tree canopies usually differ substantially from the ambient macroclimate. Trees cool down their surroundings through several biophysical mechanisms, and the cooling benefits occur also with trees outside forest. Remote sensing technologies offer new possibilities to study how tree cover affects temperatures both in local and regional scales. The aim of this study was to examine canopy cover’s effect on microclimate and land surface temperature (LST) in Taita Hills, Kenya. Temperatures recorded by 19 microclimate sensors under different canopy covers in the study area and LST estimated by Landsat 8 thermal infrared sensor (TIRS) were studied. The main interest was in daytime mean and maximum temperatures measured with the microclimate sensors in June-July 2019. The Landsat 8 imagery was obtained in July 4, 2019 and LST was retrieved using the single-channel method. The temperature records were combined with high-resolution airborne laser scanning (ALS) data of the area from years 2014 and 2015 to address how topographical factors and canopy cover affect temperatures in the area. Four multiple regression models were developed to study the joint impacts of topography and canopy cover on LST. The results showed a negative linear relationship between daytime mean and maximum temperatures and canopy cover percentage (R2 = 0.6–0.74). Any increase in canopy cover contributed to reducing temperatures at all microclimate measuring heights, the magnitude being the highest at soil surface level. The difference in mean temperatures between 0% and 100% canopy cover sites was 4.6–5.9 ˚C and in maximum temperatures 8.9–12.1 ˚C. LST was also affected negatively by canopy cover with a slope of 5.0 ˚C. It was found that canopy cover’s impact on LST depends on altitude and that a considerable dividing line existed at 1000 m a.s.l. as canopy cover’s effect in the highlands decreased to half compared to the lowlands. Based on the results it was concluded that trees have substantial effect on both microclimate and LST, but the effect is highly dependent on altitude. This indicates trees’ increasing significance in hot environments and highlights the importance of maintaining tree cover particularly in the lowland areas. Trees outside forests can increase climate change resilience in the area and the remaining forest fragments should be conserved to control the regional temperatures.
  • Abera, Temesgen; Pellikka, Petri; Heiskanen, Janne; Maeda, Eduardo (2020)
    Land surface temperature (LST) is affected by surface-atmosphere interaction. Yet, the degree to which surface and atmospheric factors impact the magnitude of LST trend is not well established. Here, we used surface energy balance, boosted regression tree model, and satellite observation and reanalysis data to unravel the effects of surface factors (albedo, sensible heat, latent heat, and ground heat) as well as incoming radiation (shortwave and longwave) on LST trends in East Africa (EA). Our result showed that 11% of EA was affected by significant (p <0.05) daytime annual LST trends, which exhibited both cooling of -0.19 K year(-1) (mainly in South Sudan and Sudan) and warming of 0.22 K year(-1) (mainly in Somalia and Kenya). The nighttime LST trends affected a large part of EA (31%) and were dominated by significant warming trend (0.06 K year(-1)). Influenced by contrasting daytime and nighttime LST trends, the diurnal LST range reduced in 15% of EA. The modeling result showed that latent heat flux (32%), incoming longwave radiation (30%), and shortwave radiation (23%) were stronger in explaining daytime LST trend. The effects of surface factors were stronger in both cooling and warming trends, whereas atmospheric factors had stronger control only on surface cooling trends. These results indicate the differential control of surface and atmospheric factors on warming and cooling trends, highlighting the importance of considering both factors for accurate evaluation of the LST trends in the future.