Browsing by Subject "lipoproteins"

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  • Wang, Qin; Wurtz, Peter; Auro, Kirsi; Morin-Papunen, Laure; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Tiainen, Mika; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Joensuu, Anni; Havulinna, Aki S.; Aalto, Kristiina; Salmi, Marko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Viikari, Jorma; Kahonen, Mika; Lehtimaki, Terho; Salomaa, Veikko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Perola, Markus; Raitakari, Olli T.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kettunen, Johannes; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2016)
    Background: Hormonal contraception is commonly used worldwide, but its systemic effects across lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acids, circulating metabolites and cytokines remain poorly understood. Methods: A comprehensive molecular profile (75 metabolic measures and 37 cytokines) was measured for up to 5841 women (age range 24-49 years) from three population-based cohorts. Women using combined oral contraceptive pills (COCPs) or progestin-only contraceptives (POCs) were compared with those who did not use hormonal contraception. Metabolomics profiles were reassessed for 869 women after 6 years to uncover the metabolic effects of starting, stopping and persistently using hormonal contraception. Results: The comprehensive molecular profiling allowed multiple new findings on the metabolic associations with the use of COCPs. They were positively associated with lipoprotein subclasses, including all high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses. The associations with fatty acids and amino acids were strong and variable in direction. COCP use was negatively associated with albumin and positively associated with creatinine and inflammatory markers, including glycoprotein acetyls and several growth factors and interleukins. Our findings also confirmed previous results e.g. for increased circulating triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. Starting COCPs caused similar metabolic changes to those observed cross-sectionally: the changes were maintained in consistent users and normalized in those who stopped using. In contrast, POCs were only weakly associated with metabolic and inflammatory markers. Results were consistent across all cohorts and for different COCP preparations and different types of POC delivery. Conclusions: Use of COCPs causes widespread metabolic and inflammatory effects. However, persistent use does not appear to accumulate the effects over time and the metabolic perturbations are reversed upon discontinuation. POCs have little effect on systemic metabolism and inflammation.
  • Määttä, Anne; Salminen, Aino; Pietiäinen, Milla; Leskelä, Jaakko; Palviainen, Teemu; Sattler, Wolfgang; Sinisalo, Juha; Salomaa, Veikko; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pussinen, Pirkko (2021)
    Our aim was to analyze whether endotoxemia, i.e. translocation of LPS to circulation, is reflected in the serum metabolic profile in a general population and in participants with cardiometabolic disorders. We investigated three Finnish cohorts separately and in a meta-analysis (n = 7178), namely population-based FINRISK97, FinnTwin16 consisting of young adult twins, and Parogene, a random cohort of cardiac patients. Endotoxemia was determined as serum LPS activity and metabolome by an NMR platform. Potential effects of body mass index (BMI), smoking, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and coronary heart disease (CHD) status were considered. Endotoxemia was directly associated with concentrations of VLDL, IDL, LDL, and small HDL lipoproteins, VLDL particle diameter, total fatty acids (FA), glycoprotein acetyls (GlycA), aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, and Glc, and inversely associated with concentration of large HDL, diameters of LDL and HDL, as well as unsaturation degree of FAs. Some of these disadvantageous associations were significantly stronger in smokers and subjects with high BMI, but did not differ between participants with different CHD status. In participants with MetS, however, the associations of endotoxemia with FA parameters and GlycA were particularly strong. The metabolic profile in endotoxemia appears highly adverse, involving several inflammatory characters and risk factors for cardiometabolic disorders.
  • Said, M. Abdullah; Yeung, Ming Wai; van de Vegte, Yordi J.; Benjamins, Jan Walter; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Ruotsalainen, Sanni; Ripatti, Samuli; Natarajan, Pradeep; Juarez-Orozco, Luis Eduardo; Verweij, Niek; van der Harst, P. (2021)
    Objective: Lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) but also to LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. The genetic architecture of Lp(a) remains incompletely understood, as well as its independence of LDL cholesterol in its association to CAD. We investigated the genetic determinants of Lp(a) concentrations in a large prospective multiethnic cohort. We tested the association for potential causality between genetically determined higher Lp(a) concentrations and CAD using a multivariable Mendelian randomization strategy. Approach and Results: We studied 371 212 participants of the UK Biobank with available Lp(a) and genome-wide genetic data. Genome-wide association analyses confirmed 2 known and identified 37 novel loci (P Conclusions: This study supports an LDL cholesterol-independent causal link between Lp(a) and CAD. A rare missense variant in the LPA gene locus appears to be protective in people with the Lp(a) increasing variant of rs10455872. In the search for therapeutic targets of Lp(a), future work should focus on understanding the functional consequences of this missense variant.
  • Sylvänne, Tuulia (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    Lipoproteins play a central role in the disease mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and therefore they have been studied widely. They carry several classes of apolipoproteins where apo-A1 and apo-B are the major classes. The sucrose based sequential lipoprotein isolation method can retrieve the lipoprotein fractions suitable for lipidomics analyses. The main lipoprotein classes are very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) that can be isolated easily by their density from human blood plasma or serum. Lipidomics analyses can quantify lipids that lipoproteins carry in the circulation. Mainly they carry cholesterol and its esterified forms, glycerolipids, small amounts of sphingolipids and phospholipids form their monolayer membrane. The isolation method was set-up together with scaled-down sample volumes. The protein and lipid content of the main lipoprotein fractions were evaluated by electrophoresis analysis, various enzymatic assays and lipidomics analyses. The total protein and apolipoprotein content was found to be similar as in the literature. Apo-B was found to be the main apolipoprotein in the VLDL and the LDL fractions whereas apo-A1 was the main apolipoprotein in the HDL fractions. Triglycerides (TG) were measured by enzymatic analysis and TG was mainly found in LDL and VLDL. The lipidomics analyses demonstrated the lipid content of the lipoproteins were similar as in the literature with minor changes. The main lipid class found in all the lipoproteins was cholesteryl esters (CE) followed by phosphatidylcholines (PC) that are commonly found in cell membranes. Sphingolipids such as ceramides were also detected in lipid class level only in small quantities in the lipoprotein fractions. The low initial sample volume did not correlate linearly with higher sample volume and low sample volume is not recommended to use in this specific isolation method. Based on the results of the comprehensive screening of isolated lipoproteins the isolation method was successfully established.
  • Casteleijn, Marco G.; Parkkila, Petteri Kalervo; Viitala, Tapani Juhani Samuel; Koivuniemi, Artturi Sakari (2018)
    LCAT is an enzyme responsible for the formation of cholesteryl esters from unesterified cholesterol (UC) and phospholipid (PL) molecules in HDL particles. However, it is poorly understood how LCAT interacts with lipoproteins and how apoA-I activates it. Here we have studied the interactions between LCAT and lipids through molecular simulations. In addition, we studied the binding of LCAT to apoA-I-derived peptides, and their effect on LCAT lipid association-utilizing experiments. Results show that LCAT anchors itself to lipoprotein surfaces by utilizing nonpolar amino acids located in the membrane-binding domain and the active site tunnel opening. Meanwhile, the membrane-anchoring hydrophobic amino acids attract cholesterol molecules next to them. The results also highlight the role of the lid-loop in the lipid binding and conformation of LCAT with respect to the lipid surface. The apoA-I-derived peptides from the LCAT-activating region bind to LCAT and promote its lipid surface interactions, although some of these peptides do not bind lipids individually. The transfer free-energy of PL from the lipid bilayer into the active site is consistent with the activation energy of LCAT. Furthermore, the entry of UC molecules into the active site becomes highly favorable by the acylation of SER181.
  • Mannisto, Ville T.; Simonen, Marko; Soininen, Pasi; Tiainen, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Kaminska, Dorota; Venesmaa, Sari; Kakela, Pirjo; Karja, Vesa; Gylling, Helena; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Pihlajamaki, Jussi (2014)
  • Sliz, Eeva; Kettunen, Johannes; Holmes, Michael V.; Williams, Clare Oliver; Boachie, Charles; Wang, Qin; Maennikkoe, Minna; Sebert, Sylvain; Walters, Robin; Lin, Kuang; Millwood, Iona Y.; Clarke, Robert; Li, Liming; Rankin, Naomi; Welsh, Paul; Delles, Christian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chen, Zhengming; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Danesh, John; Davey Smith, George; Sattar, Naveed; Butterworth, Adam; Würtz, Peter (2018)
    Background: Both statins and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors lower blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels to reduce risk of cardiovascular events. To assess potential differences between metabolic effects of these 2 lipid-lowering therapies, we performed detailed lipid and metabolite profiling of a large randomized statin trial and compared the results with the effects of genetic inhibition of PCSK9, acting as a naturally occurring trial. Methods: Two hundred twenty-eight circulating metabolic measures were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including lipoprotein subclass concentrations and their lipid composition, fatty acids, and amino acids, for 5359 individuals (2659 on treatment) in the PROSPER (Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk) trial at 6 months postrandomization. The corresponding metabolic measures were analyzed in 8 population cohorts (N=72 185) using PCSK9 rs11591147 as an unconfounded proxy to mimic the therapeutic effects of PCSK9 inhibitors. Results: Scaled to an equivalent lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the effects of genetic inhibition of PCSK9 on 228 metabolic markers were generally consistent with those of statin therapy (R-2=0.88). Alterations in lipoprotein lipid composition and fatty acid distribution were similar. However, discrepancies were observed for very-low-density lipoprotein lipid measures. For instance, genetic inhibition of PCSK9 had weaker effects on lowering of very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with statin therapy (54% versus 77% reduction, relative to the lowering effect on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; P=2x10(-7) for heterogeneity). Genetic inhibition of PCSK9 showed no significant effects on amino acids, ketones, or a marker of inflammation (GlycA), whereas statin treatment weakly lowered GlycA levels. Conclusions: Genetic inhibition of PCSK9 had similar metabolic effects to statin therapy on detailed lipid and metabolite profiles. However, PCSK9 inhibitors are predicted to have weaker effects on very-low-density lipoprotein lipids compared with statins for an equivalent lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which potentially translate into smaller reductions in cardiovascular disease risk.
  • Wurtz, Peter; Wang, Qin; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J.; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Tiainen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Tillin, Therese; Hughes, Alun D.; Mantyselka, Pekka; Kahonen, Mika; Lehtimaki, Terho; Sattar, Naveed; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Salomaa, Veikko; Kivimaki, Mika; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Smith, George Davey; Vanhala, Mauno; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Kettunen, Johannes; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2016)
    BACKGROUND Statins are first-line therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, but their systemic effects across lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acids, and circulating metabolites remain incompletely characterized. OBJECTIVES This study sought to determine the molecular effects of statin therapy on multiple metabolic pathways. METHODS Metabolic profiles based on serum nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics were quantified at 2 time points in 4 population-based cohorts from the United Kingdom and Finland (N = 5,590; 2.5 to 23.0 years of follow-up). Concentration changes in 80 lipid and metabolite measures during follow-up were compared between 716 individuals who started statin therapy and 4,874 persistent nonusers. To further understand the pharmacological effects of statins, we used Mendelian randomization to assess associations of a genetic variant known to mimic inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase (the intended drug target) with the same lipids and metabolites for 27,914 individuals from 8 population-based cohorts. RESULTS Starting statin therapy was associated with numerous lipoprotein and fatty acid changes, including substantial lowering of remnant cholesterol (80% relative to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]), but only modest lowering of triglycerides (25% relative to LDL-C). Among fatty acids, omega-6 levels decreased the most (68% relative to LDL-C); other fatty acids were only modestly affected. No robust changes were observed for circulating amino acids, ketones, or glycolysis-related metabolites. The intricate metabolic changes associated with statin use closely matched the association pattern with rs12916 in the HMGCR gene (R-2 = 0.94, slope 1.00 +/- 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Statin use leads to extensive lipid changes beyond LDL-C and appears efficacious for lowering remnant cholesterol. Metabolomic profiling, however, suggested minimal effects on amino acids. The results exemplify how detailed metabolic characterization of genetic proxies for drug targets can inform indications, pleiotropic effects, and pharmacological mechanisms. (C) 2016 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.
  • Tikkanen, Emmi; Minicocci, Ilenia; Hällfors, Jenni; Di Costanzo, Alessia; D'Erasmo, Laura; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Donini, Lorenzo Maria; Wurtz, Peter; Jauhiainen, Matti; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Arca, Marcello (2019)
    Objective- Loss-of-function (LOF) variants in the ANGPTL3 (angiopoietin-like protein 3) have been associated with low levels of plasma lipoproteins and decreased coronary artery disease risk. We aimed to determine detailed metabolic effects of genetically induced ANGPTL3 deficiency in fasting and postprandial state. Approach and Results- We studied individuals carrying S17X LOF mutation in ANGPTL3 (6 homozygous and 32 heterozygous carriers) and 38 noncarriers. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics was used to quantify 225 circulating metabolic measures. We compared metabolic differences between LOF carriers and noncarriers in fasting state and after a high-fat meal. In fasting, ANGPTL3 deficiency was characterized by similar extent of reductions in LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol (0.74 SD units lower concentration per LOF allele [95% CI, 0.42-1.06]) as observed for many TRL (triglyceride-rich lipoprotein) measures, including VLDL (very-low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol (0.75 [95% CI, 0.45-1.05]). Within most lipoprotein subclasses, absolute levels of cholesterol were decreased more than triglycerides, resulting in the relative proportion of cholesterol being reduced within TRLs and their remnants. Further, beta-hydroxybutyrate was elevated (0.55 [95% CI, 0.21-0.89]). Homozygous ANGPTL3 LOF carriers showed essentially no postprandial increase in TRLs and fatty acids, without evidence for adverse compensatory metabolic effects. Conclusions- In addition to overall triglyceride- and LDL cholesterol-lowering effects, ANGPTL3 deficiency results in reduction of cholesterol proportion within TRLs and their remnants. Further, ANGPTL3 LOF carriers had elevated ketone body production, suggesting enhanced hepatic fatty acid beta-oxidation. The detailed metabolic profile in human knockouts of ANGPTL3 reinforces inactivation of ANGPTL3 as a promising therapeutic target for decreasing cardiovascular risk.
  • Ruuth, Maija; Äikäs, Lauri; Tigistu-Sahle, Feven; Käkelä, Reijo; Lindholm, Harri; Simonen, Piia; Kovanen, Petri T.; Gylling, Helena; Öörni, Katariina (2020)
    OBJECTIVE: Plant stanol ester supplementation (2-3 g plant stanols/d) reduces plasma LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol concentration by 9% to 12% and is, therefore, recommended as part of prevention and treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In addition to plasma LDL-cholesterol concentration, also qualitative properties of LDL particles can influence atherogenesis. However, the effect of plant stanol ester consumption on the proatherogenic properties of LDL has not been studied. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Study subjects (n=90) were randomized to consume either a plant stanol ester-enriched spread (3.0 g plant stanols/d) or the same spread without added plant stanol esters for 6 months. Blood samples were taken at baseline and after the intervention. The aggregation susceptibility of LDL particles was analyzed by inducing aggregation of isolated LDL and following aggregate formation. LDL lipidome was determined by mass spectrometry. Binding of serum lipoproteins to proteoglycans was measured using a microtiter well-based assay. LDL aggregation susceptibility was decreased in the plant stanol ester group, and the median aggregate size after incubation for 2 hours decreased from 1490 to 620 nm,P=0.001. Plant stanol ester-induced decrease in LDL aggregation was more extensive in participants having body mass index CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of plant stanol esters decreases the aggregation susceptibility of LDL particles by modifying LDL lipidome. The resulting improvement of LDL quality may be beneficial for cardiovascular health. REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01315964. GRAPHIC ABSTRACT: A graphic abstract is available for this article.
  • Robciuc, Marius R.; Tahvanainen, Esa; Jauhiainen, Matti; Ehnholm, Christian (2010)
  • Paivarinta, Essi; Itkonen, Suvi T.; Pellinen, Tiina; Lehtovirta, Mikko; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Pajari, Anne-Maria (2020)
    Increased consumption of plant-based foods and decreased consumption of animal-based foods is recommended for healthy diets and sustainable food production. We investigated the effects of partial replacement of dietary animal proteins with plant-based ones on intake of energy-yielding nutrients, fibre, and plasma lipoproteins. This 12-week randomised clinical intervention comprised 107 women and 29 men (20-69 years) in three diet groups with different dietary protein compositions ("ANIMAL": Animal 70%/plant 30%; "50/50": Animal 50%/plant 50%; "PLANT": Animal 30%/plant 70%; all: Protein intake 17 E%). Nutrient intakes were assessed by 4-day food records. Saturated fat intake (E%) was lower and polyunsaturated fatty acid intake (E%) higher in the PLANT and 50/50 groups compared to the ANIMAL group (p <0.001 for all). Fibre intake was higher in the PLANT (p ? 0.001) and 50/50 (p = 0.012) groups. Total and LDL cholesterol were lower in the PLANT than in the ANIMAL group (p = 0.003 for both) but no differences in HDL cholesterol or triglycerides were observed (p > 0.05). Replacing animal protein with plant protein sources in the diet led to an increased fibre intake and improved dietary fat quality as well as blood lipoprotein profile. Flexitarian diets could provide healthy and more sustainable alternatives for the current, predominantly animal-based diets.
  • Adiels, Martin; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Björnson, Elias; Andersson, Linda; Matikainen, Niina; Söderlund, Sanni; Kahri, Juhani; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Nina; Sihlbom, Carina; Thorsell, Annika; Zhou, Haihong; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Packard, Chris; Boren, Jan (2019)
    Aims To investigate how apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) metabolism is altered in subjects with type 2 diabetes, whether the perturbed plasma triglyceride concentrations in this condition are determined primarily by the secretion rate or the removal rate of apoC-III, and whether improvement of glycaemic control using the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue liraglutide for 16 weeks modifies apoC-III dynamics. Materials and Methods Postprandial apoC-III kinetics were assessed after a bolus injection of [5,5,5-H-2(3)]leucine using ultrasensitive mass spectrometry techniques. We compared apoC-III kinetics in two situations: in subjects with type 2 diabetes before and after liraglutide therapy, and in type 2 diabetic subjects with matched body mass index (BMI) non-diabetic subjects. Liver fat content, subcutaneous abdominal and intra-abdominal fat were determined using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Improved glycaemic control by liraglutide therapy for 16 weeks significantly reduced apoC-III secretion rate (561 +/- 198 vs. 652 +/- 196 mg/d, P = 0.03) and apoC-III levels (10.0 +/- 3.8 vs. 11.7 +/- 4.3 mg/dL, P = 0.035) in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Change in apoC-III secretion rate was significantly associated with the improvement in indices of glucose control (r = 0.67; P = 0.009) and change in triglyceride area under the curve (r = 0.59; P = 0.025). In line with this, the apoC-III secretion rate was higher in subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with BMI-matched non-diabetic subjects (676 +/- 208 vs. 505 +/- 174 mg/d, P = 0.042). Conclusions The results reveal that the secretion rate of apoC-III is associated with elevation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in subjects with type 2 diabetes, potentially through the influence of glucose homeostasis on the production of apoC-III.
  • Luukkonen, Panu K.; Qadri, Sami; Lehtimäki, Tiina E.; Juuti, Anne; Sammalkorpi, Henna; Penttilä, Anne K.; Hakkarainen, Antti; Orho-Melander, Marju; Arola, Johanna; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele (2021)
    Context: The I148M (rs738409-G) variant in PNPLA3 increases liver fat content but may be protective against cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance (IR) amplifies the effect of PNPLA3-I148M on liver fat. Objective: To study whether PNPLA3-I148M confers an antihyperlipidemic effect in insulin-resistant patients. Design: Cross-sectional study comparing the impact of PNPLA3-I148M on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in 2 cohorts, both divided into groups based on rs738409-G allele carrier status and median HOMA-IR. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Patients: A total of 298 obese patients who underwent a liver biopsy during bariatric surgery (bariatric cohort: age 49 +/- 9 years, body mass index [BMI] 43.2 +/- 6.8 kg/m(2)), and 345 less obese volunteers in whom liver fat was measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (nonbariatric cohort: age 45 +/- 14 years, BMI 29.7 +/- 5.7 kg/m(2)). Main Outcome Measures: Nuclear magnetic resonance profiling of plasma lipids, lipoprotein particle subclasses and their composition. Results: In both cohorts, individuals carrying the PNPLA3-I148M variant had significantly higher liver fat content than noncarriers. In insulin-resistant and homozygous carriers, PNPLA3-I148M exerted a distinct antihyperlipidemic effect with decreased very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and their constituents, and increased high-density lipoprotein particles and their constituents, compared with noncarriers. VLDL particles were smaller and LDL particles larger in PNPLA3-I148M carriers. These changes were geometrically opposite to those due to IR. PNPLA3-I148M did not have a measurable effect in patients with lower IR, and its effect was smaller albeit still significant in the less obese than in the obese cohort. Conclusions: PNPLA3-I148M confers an antiatherogenic plasma lipid profile particularly in insulin-resistant individuals.
  • Boren, Jan; Packard, Chris J.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta (2020)
    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally. It is well-established based on evidence accrued during the last three decades that high plasma concentrations of cholesterol-rich atherogenic lipoproteins are causatively linked to CVD, and that lowering these reduces atherosclerotic cardiovascular events in humans (1-9). Historically, most attention has been on low-density lipoproteins (LDL) since these are the most abundant atherogenic lipoproteins in the circulation, and thus the main carrier of cholesterol into the artery wall. However, with the rise of obesity and insulin resistance in many populations, there is increasing interest in the role of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and their metabolic remnants, with accumulating evidence showing they too are causatively linked to CVD. Plasma triglyceride, measured either in the fasting or non-fasting state, is a useful index of the abundance of TRLs and recent research into the biology and genetics of triglyceride heritability has provided new insight into the causal relationship of TRLs with CVD. Of the genetic factors known to influence plasma triglyceride levels variation inAPOC3- the gene for apolipoprotein (apo) C-III - has emerged as being particularly important as a regulator of triglyceride transport and a novel therapeutic target to reduce dyslipidaemia and CVD risk (10).