Browsing by Subject "low back pain"

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  • Honkanen, Tuomas; Mäntysaari, M.; Leino, Tuomo; Avela, J.; Kerttula, L.; Haapamäki, V.; Kyröläinen, Heikki (2019)
    Background: A small cross sectional area (CSA) of the paraspinal muscles may be related to low back pain among military aviators but previous studies have mainly concentrated on spinal disc degeneration. Therefore, the primary aim of the study was to investigate the changes in muscle CSA and composition of the psoas and paraspinal muscles during a 5-year follow up among Finnish Air Force (FINAF) fighter pilots. Methods: Study population consisted of 26 volunteered FINAF male fighter pilots (age: 20.6 (±0.6) at the baseline). The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were collected at baseline and after 5 years of follow-up. CSA and composition of the paraspinal and psoas muscles were obtained at the levels of 3-4 and 4-5 lumbar spine. Maximal isometric strength tests were only performed on one occasion at baseline. Results: The follow-up comparisons indicated that the mean CSA of the paraspinal muscles increased (p <0.01) by 8% at L3-4 level and 7% at L4-5 level during the 5-year period. There was no change in muscle composition during the follow-up period. The paraspinal and psoas muscles' CSA was positively related to overall maximal isometric strength at the baseline. However, there was no association between LBP and muscle composition or CSA. Conclusions: The paraspinal muscles' CSA increased among FINAF fighter pilots during the first 5 years of service. This might be explained by physically demanding work and regular physical activity. However, no associations between muscle composition or CSA and low back pain (LBP) experienced were observed after the five-year follow-up. © 2019 The Author(s).
  • Kaartinen, Sara; Korhonen, Tellervo; Rottensteiner, Mirva; Kujala, Urho M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Aaltonen, Sari (2020)
    Leisure-time physical activity has a complex relationship with low back pain (LBP). Thus, we aimed to investigate whether the diversity of sport activities is associated with the type of LBP. In the FinnTwin16 study, 4246 (55% females) Finnish twins at mean age 34.1 years replied to a health behaviour survey in 2010-2012. Based on the participation in different sport activities, we created two measures of diversity: quantity (i.e. the number of sport activities: 1, 2, 3, 4 and >= 5) and quality (i.e. the type of sport activity: endurance, strength, body care, etc.). Based on the frequency, duration and type of LBP, we created three groups: no history of LBP lasting more than one day, radiating LBP and non-radiating LBP. The associations between the quantity and quality of sport activities and the type of LBP were investigated with logistic regression analyses. Participation in >= 5 sport activities associated with less radiating and non-radiating LBP in analyses pooled across sex (odds ratio 0.46, 95% CI 0.30-0.69 and 0.66, 0.44-0.99, respectively). However, the associations attenuated after adjusting for several confounders. Participation in endurance sports was associated with less radiating (0.58, 0.43-0.76) and non-radiating (0.60, 0.44-0.81) LBP, whereas strength sports and body care only with less radiating LBP (0.76, 0.58-1.00 and 0.26, 0.09-0.74, respectively) adjusted for all sport types. On a sport-specific level, running and cycling were associated with less radiating and non-radiating LBP. In adulthood, the diversity of sport activities, particularly participation in endurance sports, may be associated with less radiating and non-radiating LBP.
  • Russo, Fabrizio; De Salvatore, Sergio; Ambrosio, Luca; Vadalà, Gianluca; Fontana, Luca; Papalia, Rocco; Rantanen, Jorma; Iavicoli, Sergio; Denaro, Vincenzo (2021)
    Low back pain (LBP) is currently the leading cause of disability worldwide and the mostcommon reason for workers’ compensation (WC) claims. Studies have demonstrated that receivingWC is associated with a negative prognosis following treatment for a vast range of health conditions.However, the impact of WC on outcomes after spine surgery is still controversial. The aim of thismeta-analysis was to systematically review the literature and analyze the impact of compensationstatus on outcomes after lumbar spine surgery. A systematic search was performed on Medline,Scopus, CINAHL, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases. The review included studies of patientsundergoing lumbar spine surgery in which compensation status was reported. Methodologicalquality was assessed through ROBINS-I and quality of evidence was estimated using the GRADErating. A total of 26 studies with a total of 2668 patients were included in the analysis. WC patientshad higher post-operative pain and disability, as well as lower satisfaction after surgery whencompared to those without WC. Furthermore, WC patients demonstrated to have a delayed return towork. According to our results, compensation status is associated with poor outcomes after lumbarspine surgery. Contextualizing post-operative outcomes in clinical and work-related domains helpsunderstand the multifactorial nature of the phenomenon.
  • Halonen, Jaana I.; Shiri, Rahman; Hanson, Linda L. Magnusson; Lallukka, Tea (2019)
    Study Design. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Objective. To determine the associations for workload and health-related factors with incident and recurrent low back pain (LBP), and to determine the mediating role of health-related factors in associations between physical workload factors and incident LBP. Summary of Background Data. It is not known whether the risk factors for the development of LBP are also prognostic factors for recurrence of LBP and whether the associations between physical workload and incident LBP are mediated by health-related factors. We used data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health study. Those responding to any two subsequent surveys in 2010 to 2016 were included for the main analyses (N = 17,962). Information on occupational lifting, working in twisted positions, weight/height, smoking, physical activity, depressive symptoms, and sleep problems were self-reported. Incident LBP was defined as pain limiting daily activities in the preceding three months in participants free from LBP at baseline. Recurrent LBP was defined as having LBP both at baseline and follow-up. For the mediation analyses, those responding to three subsequent surveys were included (N = 3516). Methods. Main associations were determined using generalized estimating equation models for repeated measures data. Mediation was examined with counterfactual mediation analysis. Results. All risk factors at baseline but smoking and physical activity were associated with incident LBP after adjustment for confounders. The strongest associations were observed for working in twisted positions (risk ratio = 1.52, 95% CI 1.37, 1.70) and occupational lifting (risk ratio = 1.52, 95% CI 1.32, 1.74). These associations were not mediated by health-related factors. The studied factors did not have meaningful effects on recurrent LBP. Conclusion. The findings suggest that workload and health-related factors have stronger effects on the development than on the recurrence or progression of LBP, and that health-related factors do not mediate associations between workload factors and incident LBP.