Browsing by Subject "microcystin"

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  • Liu, Liwei; Herfindal, Lars; Jokela, Jouni; Shishido, Tania Keiko; Wahlsten, Matti; Doskeland, Stein Ove; Sivonen, Kaarina (2014)
  • Wood, Steffaney M.; Kremp, Anke; Savela, Henna; Akter, Sultana; Vartti, Vesa-Pekka; Saarni, Saija; Suikkanen, Sanna (Frontiers in Microbiology, 2021)
    Frontiers in Microbiology 12
    Cyanobacteria of the order Nostocales, including Baltic Sea bloom-forming taxa Nodularia spumigena, Aphanizomenon flosaquae, and Dolichospermum spp., produce resting stages, known as akinetes, under unfavorable conditions. These akinetes can persist in the sediment and germinate if favorable conditions return, simultaneously representing past blooms and possibly contributing to future bloom formation. The present study characterized cyanobacterial akinete survival, germination, and potential cyanotoxin production in brackish water sediment archives from coastal and open Gulf of Finland in order to understand recent bloom expansion, akinete persistence, and cyanobacteria life cycles in the northern Baltic Sea. Results showed that cyanobacterial akinetes can persist in and germinate from Northern Baltic Sea sediment up to >40 and >400 years old, at coastal and open-sea locations, respectively. Akinete abundance and viability decreased with age and depth of vertical sediment layers. The detection of potential microcystin and nodularin production from akinetes was minimal and restricted to the surface sediment layers. Phylogenetic analysis of culturable cyanobacteria from the coastal sediment core indicated that most strains likely belonged to the benthic genus Anabaena. Potentially planktonic species of Dolichospermum could only be revived from the near-surface layers of the sediment, corresponding to an estimated age of 1–3 years. Results of germination experiments supported the notion that akinetes do not play an equally significant role in the life cycles of all bloom-forming cyanobacteria in the Baltic Sea. Overall, there was minimal congruence between akinete abundance, cyanotoxin concentration, and the presence of cyanotoxin biosynthetic genes in either sediment core. Further research is recommended to accurately detect and quantify akinetes and cyanotoxin genes from brackish water sediment samples in order to further describe species-specific benthic archives of cyanobacteria.
  • Gorokhova, Elena; El-Shehawy, Rehab; Lehtiniemi, Maiju; Garbaras, Andrius (Frontiers Research Foundation, 2021)
    Frontiers in Microbiology 11
    Toxin-producing cyanobacteria can be harmful to aquatic biota, although some grazers utilize them with often beneficial effects on their growth and reproduction. It is commonly assumed that gut microbiota facilitates host adaptation to the diet; however, the evidence for adaptation mechanisms is scarce. Here, we investigated the abundance of mlrA genes in the gut of the Baltic copepods Acartia bifilosa and Eurytemora affinis during cyanobacteria bloom season (August) and outside it (February). The mlrA genes are unique to microcystin and nodularin degraders, thus indicating the capacity to break down these toxins by the microbiota. The mlrA genes were expressed in the copepod gut year-round, being >10-fold higher in the summer than in the winter populations. Moreover, they were significantly more abundant in Eurytemora than Acartia. To understand the ecological implications of this variability, we conducted feeding experiments using summer- and winter-collected copepods to examine if/how the mlrA abundance in the microbiota affect: (1) uptake of toxic Nodularia spumigena, (2) uptake of a non-toxic algal food offered in mixtures with N. spumigena, and (3) concomitant growth potential in the copepods. The findings provide empirical evidence that the occurrence of mlrA genes in the copepod microbiome facilitates nutrient uptake and growth when feeding on phytoplankton mixtures containing nodularin-producing cyanobacteria; thus, providing an adaptation mechanism to the cyanobacteria blooms.
  • Osterholm, Julia; Popin, Rafael V.; Fewer, David P.; Sivonen, Kaarina (2020)
    Cyanobacteria produce an array of toxins that pose serious health risks to humans and animals. The closely related diazotrophic genera, Anabaena, Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon, frequently form poisonous blooms in lakes and brackish waters around the world. These genera form a complex now termed the Anabaena, Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon (ADA) clade and produce a greater array of toxins than any other cyanobacteria group. However, taxonomic confusion masks the distribution of toxin biosynthetic pathways in cyanobacteria. Here we obtained 11 new draft genomes to improve the understanding of toxin production in these genera. Comparison of secondary metabolite pathways in all available 31 genomes for these three genera suggests that the ability to produce microcystin, anatoxin-a, and saxitoxin is associated with specific subgroups. Each toxin gene cluster was concentrated or even limited to a certain subgroup within the ADA clade. Our results indicate that members of the ADA clade encode a variety of secondary metabolites following the phylogenetic clustering of constituent species. The newly sequenced members of the ADA clade show that phylogenetic separation of planktonic Dolichospermum and benthic Anabaena is not complete. This underscores the importance of taxonomic revision of Anabaena, Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon genera to reflect current phylogenomic understanding.
  • Mantzouki, Evanthia; Lurling, Miquel; Fastner, Jutta; Domis, Lisette de Senerpont; Wilk-Wozniak, Elzbieta; Koreiviene, Judita; Seelen, Laura; Teurlincx, Sven; Verstijnen, Yvon; Krzton, Wojciech; Walusiak, Edward; Karosiene, Jurate; Kasperoviciene, Jurate; Savadova, Ksenija; Vitonyte, Irma; Cillero-Castro, Carmen; Budzynska, Agnieszka; Goldyn, Ryszard; Kozak, Anna; Rosinska, Joanna; Szelag-Wasielewska, Elzbieta; Domek, Piotr; Jakubowska-Krepska, Natalia; Kwasizur, Kinga; Messyasz, Beata; Pelechata, Aleksandra; Pelechaty, Mariusz; Kokocinski, Mikolaj; Garcia-Murcia, Ana; Real, Monserrat; Romans, Elvira; Noguero-Ribes, Jordi; Parreno Duque, David; Fernandez-Moran, Elisabeth; Karakaya, Nusret; Haggqvist, Kerstin; Demir, Nilsun; Beklioglu, Meryem; Filiz, Nur; Levi, Eti E.; Iskin, Ugur; Bezirci, Gizem; Tavsanoglu, Ulku Nihan; Ozhan, Koray; Gkelis, Spyros; Panou, Manthos; Fakioglu, Ozden; Yang, Yang; Salmi, Pauliina; Arvola, Lauri (2018)
    Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI) increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains.