Browsing by Subject "mitochondria"

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  • McWilliams, Thomas G.; Prescott, Alan R.; Villarejo-Zori, Beatriz; Ball, Graeme; Boya, Patricia; Ganleya, Ian G. (2019)
    Photoreception is pivotal to our experience and perception of the natural world; hence the eye is of prime importance for most vertebrate animals to sense light. Central to visual health is mitochondrial homeostasis, and the selective autophagic turnover of mitochondria (mitophagy) is predicted to play a key role here. Despite studies that link aberrant mitophagy to ocular dysfunction, little is known about the prevalence of basal mitophagy, or its relationship to general autophagy, in the visual system. In this study, we utilize the mito-QC mouse and a closely related general macroautophagy reporter model to profile basal mitophagy and macroautophagy in the adult and developing eye. We report that ocular macroautophagy is widespread, but surprisingly mitophagy does not always follow the same pattern of occurrence. We observe low levels of mitophagy in the lens and ciliary body, in stark contrast to the high levels of general MAP1LC3-dependent macroautophagy in these regions. We uncover a striking reversal of this process in the adult retina, where mitophagy accounts for a larger degree of the macroautophagy taking place, specifically in the photoreceptor neurons of the outer nuclear layer. We also show the developmental regulation of autophagy in a variety of ocular tissues. In particular, mitophagy in the adult mouse retina is reversed in localization during the latter stages of development. Our work thus defines the landscape of mitochondrial homeostasis in the mammalian eye, and in doing so highlights the selective nature of autophagy in vivo and the specificity of the reporters used.
  • Gonzalez de Cozar, Jose M.; Carretero-Junquera, Maria; Ciesielski, Grzegorz L.; Miettinen, Sini M.; Varjosalo, Markku; Kaguni, Laurie S.; Dufour, Eric; Jacobs, Howard T. (2020)
    In eukaryotes, ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1) is involved in the processing and removal of RNA/DNA hybrids in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. The enzyme comprises a C-terminal catalytic domain and an N-terminal hybrid-binding domain (HBD), separated by a linker of variable length, 115 amino acids in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm). Molecular modelling predicted this extended linker to fold into a structure similar to the conserved HBD. Based on a deletion series, both the catalytic domain and the conserved HBD were required for high-affinity binding to heteroduplex substrates, while loss of the novel HBD led to an similar to 90% drop in K-cat with a decreased K-M, and a large increase in the stability of the RNA/DNA hybrid-enzyme complex, supporting a bipartite-binding model in which the second HBD facilitates processivity. Shotgun proteomics following in vivo cross-linking identified single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from both nuclear and mitochondrial compartments, respectively RpA-70 and mtSSB, as prominent interaction partners of Dm RNase H1. However, we were not able to document direct and stable interactions with mtSSB when the proteins were cooverexpressed in S2 cells, and functional interactions between them in vitro were minor.
  • Giordano, Luca; Farnham, Antoine; Dhandapani, Praveen K.; Salminen, Laura; Bhaskaran, Jahnavi; Voswinckel, Robert; Rauschkolb, Peter; Scheibe, Susan; Sommer, Natascha; Beisswenger, Christoph; Weissmann, Norbert; Braun, Thomas; Jacobs, Howard T.; Bals, Robert; Herr, Christian; Szibor, Marten (2019)
    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure is the predominant risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the third leading cause of death worldwide. We aimed to elucidate whether mitochondrial respiratory inhibition and oxidative stress are triggers in its etiology. In different models of CS exposure, we investigated the effect on lung remodeling and cell signaling of restoring mitochondrial respiratory electron flow using alternative oxidase (AOX), which bypasses the cytochrome segment of the respiratory chain. AOX attenuated CS-induced lung tissue destruction and loss of function in mice exposed chronically to CS for 9 months. It preserved the cell viability of isolated mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with CS condensate, limited the induction of apoptosis, and decreased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, the early-phase inflammatory response induced by acute CS exposure of mouse lung, i.e., infiltration by macrophages and neutrophils and adverse signaling, was unaffected. The use of AOX allowed us to obtain novel pathomechanistic insights into CS-induced cell damage, mitochondrial ROS production, and lung remodeling. Our findings implicate mitochondrial respiratory inhibition as a key pathogenic mechanism of CS toxicity in the lung. We propose AOX as a novel tool to study CS-related lung remodeling and potentially to counteract CS-induced ROS production and cell damage.
  • Saari, Sini; Kemppainen, Esa; Tuomela, Tero; Oliveira, M.T.; Dufour, E.; Jacobs, H.T. (2019)
    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase, AOX, present in most eukaryotes apart from vertebrates and insects, catalyzes the direct oxidation of ubiquinol by oxygen, by-passing the terminal proton-motive steps of the respiratory chain. Its physiological role is not fully understood, but it is proposed to buffer stresses in the respiratory chain similar to those encountered in mitochondrial diseases in humans. Previously, we found that the ubiquitous expression of AOX from Ciona intestinalis in Drosophila perturbs the development of flies cultured under low-nutrient conditions (media containing only glucose and yeast). Here we tested the effects of a wide range of nutritional supplements on Drosophila development, to gain insight into the physiological mechanism underlying this developmental failure. On low-nutrient medium, larvae contained decreased amounts of triglycerides, lactate, and pyruvate, irrespective of AOX expression. Complex food supplements, including treacle (molasses), restored normal development to AOX-expressing flies, but many individual additives did not. Inhibition of AOX by treacle extract was excluded as a mechanism, since the supplement did not alter the enzymatic activity of AOX in vitro. Furthermore, antibiotics did not influence the organismal phenotype, indicating that commensal microbes were not involved. Fractionation of treacle identified a water-soluble fraction with low solubility in ethanol, rich in lactate and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, which contained the critical activity. We propose that the partial activation of AOX during metamorphosis impairs the efficient use of stored metabolites, resulting in developmental failure. © 2019 The Authors. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological Genetics and Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • Butkovic, Rebeka (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    Autophagy is a cellular recycling and quality control process that eliminates cellular material in a non-selective or selective fashion. Macroautophagy is non-selective, and degrades macromolecules or damaged organelles to sustain cellular homeostasis. The selective autophagy of dysfunctional or excess mitochondria is known as mitophagy. The clinical importance of functional degradation is exemplified by the lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), where lysosomal hydrolytic enzymes are absent or dysfunctional. Previous investigations of a rare infantile LSD indicated a change in autophagy and decreased mitochondrial content. The aim of this MSc thesis was to quantitatively compare macroautophagy and mitophagy in a cellular model of this rare LSD, by generating fluorescent macroautophagy and mitophagy reporter-expressing cell lines from patient material. Fibroblasts derived from patients diagnosed with a rare infantile LSD were transduced with lentiviruses carrying either mCherry-GFP-LC3 or mito-QC reporters, for the microscopic analysis of autophagy and mitophagy, respectively. I also monitored autophagic flux by traditional biochemistry in untreated and starved cells, in the presence or absence of lysosomal inhibitors (bafilomycin A1). Basal and iron-depletion induced mitophagy was profiled using confocal microscopy, quantitative cell biology and biochemistry. My findings suggest differential autophagic turnover in LSD patient-derived fibroblasts, with a marked accumulation of non-acidified autophagic structures. Basal mitophagy was elevated in two out of three LSD patient cell lines compared to unaffected controls. LSD patient cells exhibited altered mitochondrial content and network architecture compared to controls. These phenotypes were accompanied by distinct changes in the endo-lysosomal system and increased cell size. The patient-derived cells exhibit a profound accumulation of lysosomes and autophagic structures. My findings are in accordance with previous research in the field, suggesting perturbed macroautophagy in this rare LSD. The observations of altered mitochondrial homeostasis in this LSD provide a basis for future investigation. The reporter-expressing cells, generated as part of this MSc thesis project, will enable future studies of mechanisms that underlie phenotypic changes, and will complement essential in vivo work in this area.
  • Guo, Lishu; Carraro, Michela; Sartori, Geppo; Minervini, Giovanni; Eriksson, Ove; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo (2018)
    Modification with arginine-specific glyoxals modulates the permeability transition (PT) of rat liver mitochondria, with inhibitory or inducing effects that depend on the net charge of the adduct(s). Here, we show that phenylglyoxal (PGO) affects the PT in a species-specific manner (inhibition in mouse and yeast, induction in human and Drosophila mitochondria). Following the hypotheses (i) that the effects are mediated by conserved arginine(s) and (ii) that the PT is mediated by the F-ATP synthase, we have narrowed the search to 60 arginines. Most of these residues are located in subunits alpha, beta, gamma, epsilon, a, and c and were excluded because PGO modification did not significantly affect enzyme catalysis. On the other hand, yeast mitochondria lacking subunit g or bearing a subunit g R107A mutation were totally resistant to PT inhibition by PGO. Thus, the effect of PGO on the PT is specifically mediated by Arg-107, the only subunit g arginine that has been conserved across species. These findings are evidence that the PT is mediated by F-ATP synthase.
  • Mirzalieva, Oygul; Jeon, Shinhye; Damri, Kevin; Hartke, Ruth; Drwesh, Layla; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Azem, Abdussalam; Dunn, Cory D.; Peixoto, Pablo M. (2019)
    The TIM23 complex is a hub for translocation of preproteins into or across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This dual sorting mechanism is currently being investigated, and in yeast appears to be regulated by a recently discovered subunit, the Mgr2 protein. Deletion of Mgr2p has been found to delay protein translocation into the matrix and accumulation in the inner membrane. This result and other findings suggested that Mgr2p controls the lateral release of inner membrane proteins harboring a stop-transfer signal that follows an N-terminal amino acid signal. However, the mechanism of lateral release is unknown. Here, we used patch clamp electrophysiology to investigate the role of Mgr2p on the channel activity of TIM23. Deletion of Mgr2p decreased normal channel frequency and increased occurrence of a residual TIM23 activity. The residual channel lacked gating transitions but remained sensitive to synthetic import signal peptides. Similarly, a G145L mutation in Tim23p displaced Mgr2p from the import complex leading to gating impairment. These results suggest that Mgr2p regulates the gating behavior of the TIM23 channel.
  • van der Kolk, Birgitta W.; Muniandy, Maheswary; Kaminska, Dorota; Alvarez, Marcus; Ko, Arthur; Miao, Zong; Valsesia, Armand; Langin, Dominique; Vaittinen, Maija; Paakkonen, Mirva; Jokinen, Riikka; Kaye, Sanna; Heinonen, Sini; Virtanen, Kirsi A.; Andersson, Daniel P.; Männistö, Ville; Saris, Wim H.; Astrup, Arne; Ryden, Mikael; Blaak, Ellen E.; Pajukanta, Paivi; Pihlajamaki, Jussi; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. (2021)
    Context: Mitochondria are essential for cellular energy homeostasis, yet their role in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) during different types of weight-loss interventions remains unknown. Objective: To investigate how SAT mitochondria change following diet-induced and bariatric surgery-induced weight-loss interventions in 4 independent weight-loss studies. Methods: The DiOGenes study is a European multicenter dietary intervention with an 8-week low caloric diet (LCD; 800 kcal/d; n = 261) and 6-month weight-maintenance (n = 121) period. The Kuopio Obesity Surgery study (KOBS) is a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery study (n = 172) with a 1-year follow-up. We associated weight-loss percentage with global and 2210 mitochondria-related RNA transcripts in linear regression analysis adjusted for age and sex. We repeated these analyses in 2 studies. The Finnish CRYO study has a 6-week LCD (800-1000 kcal/d; n = 19) and a 10.5-month follow-up. The Swedish DEOSH study is a RYGB surgery study with a 2-year (n = 49) and 5-year (n = 37) follow-up. Results: Diet-induced weight loss led to a significant transcriptional downregulation of oxidative phosphorylation (DiOGenes; ingenuity pathway analysis [IPA] z-scores: -8.7 following LCD, -4.4 following weight maintenance; CRYO: IPA z-score: -5.6, all P < 0.001), while upregulation followed surgery-induced weight loss (KOBS: IPA z-score: 1.8, P < 0.001; in DEOSH: IPA z-scores: 4.0 following 2 years, 0.0 following 5 years). We confirmed an upregulated oxidative phosphorylation at the proteomics level following surgery (IPA z-score: 3.2, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Differentially regulated SAT mitochondria-related gene expressions suggest qualitative alterations between weight-loss interventions, providing insights into the potential molecular mechanistic targets for weight-loss success.
  • Hikmat, Omar; Naess, Karin; Engvall, Martin; Klingenberg, Claus; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Fiskerstrand, Torunn; Isohanni, Pirjo; Uusimaa, Johanna; Darin, Niklas; Rahman, Shamima; Bindoff, Laurence A. (2018)
    Objective: Epilepsy is common in individuals with mutations in POLG, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Early recognition and aggressive seizure management are crucial for patient survival. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is implicated in various neurological disorders including epilepsy. The aim of this study was to assess whether POLG-related disease is associated with BBB dysfunction and what clinical implications this has for patients. Methods: Our retrospective study used data from 83 patients with pathogenic POLG mutations from 4 countries-Norway, Sweden, Finland, and the United Kingdom. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. We used the presence of raised cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein and a raised CSF/serum ratio of albumin (Q-alb) to evaluate the integrity of the blood-CSF bather. Results: Raised CSF protein was found in 70% of patients (n = 58/83) and appeared to be associated with the most severe phenotypes. In those in whom it was measured, the Q-alb ratio was markedly elevated (n = 18). The majority of those with epilepsy (n = 50/66, 76%) had raised CSF protein, and this preceded seizure debut in 75% (n = 15/20). The median survival time from symptom onset for those with raised CSF protein was decreased (13 months) compared to those with normal CSF protein (32 months). Significance: Our results indicate that there is disruption of the BBB in POLG-related disease, as evidenced by a raised CSF protein and Q-alb ratio. We also find that raised CSF protein is a common finding in patients with POLG disease. Our data suggest that the presence of BBB dysfunction predicts a poorer outcome, and elevated CSF protein may therefore be an additional biomarker both for early diagnosis and to identify those at high risk of developing epilepsy.
  • Anwar, Tahira; Liu, Xiaonan; Suntio, Taina; Marjamäki, Annika; Biazik, Joanna; Chan, Edmond Y. W.; Varjosalo, Markku; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa (2019)
    Autophagy transports cytoplasmic material and organelles to lysosomes for degradation and recycling. Beclin 1 forms a complex with several other autophagy proteins and functions in the initiation phase of autophagy, but the exact role of Beclin 1 subcellular localization in autophagy initiation is still unclear. In order to elucidate the role of Beclin 1 localization in autophagosome biogenesis, we generated constructs that target Beclin 1 to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or mitochondria. Our results confirmed the proper organelle-specific targeting of the engineered Beclin 1 constructs, and the proper formation of autophagy-regulatory Beclin 1 complexes. The ULK kinases are required for autophagy initiation upstream of Beclin 1, and autophagosome biogenesis is severely impaired in ULK1/ULK2 double knockout cells. We tested whether Beclin 1 targeting facilitated its ability to rescue autophagosome formation in ULK1/ULK2 double knockout cells. ER-targeted Beclin 1 was most effective in the rescue experiments, while mitochondria-targeted and non-targeted Beclin 1 also showed an ability to rescue, but with lower activity. However, none of the constructs was able to increase autophagic flux in the knockout cells. We also showed that wild type Beclin 1 was enriched on the ER during autophagy induction, and that ULK1/ULK2 facilitated the ER-enrichment of Beclin 1 under basal conditions. The results suggest that one of the functions of ULK kinases may be to enhance Beclin 1 recruitment to the ER to drive autophagosome formation.
  • Abbade, Joelcio; Klemetti, Miira; Farrell, Abby; Ermini, Leonardo; Gillmore, Taylor; Sallais, Julien; Tagliaferro, Andrea; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella (2020)
    IntroductionGestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common pregnancy disorder, increases the risk of fetal overgrowth and later metabolic morbidity in the offspring. The placenta likely mediates these sequelae, but the exact mechanisms remain elusive. Mitochondrial dynamics refers to the joining and division of these organelles, in attempts to maintain cellular homeostasis in stress conditions or alterations in oxygen and fuel availability. These remodeling processes are critical to optimize mitochondrial function, and their disturbances characterize diabetes and obesity.Methods and resultsHerein we show that placental mitochondrial dynamics are tilted toward fusion in GDM, as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and changes in the expression of key mechanochemical enzymes such as OPA1 and active phosphorylated DRP1. In vitro experiments using choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells demonstrated that increased exposure to insulin, which typifies GDM, promotes mitochondrial fusion. As placental ceramide induces mitochondrial fission in pre-eclampsia, we also examined ceramide content in GDM and control placentae and observed a reduction in placental ceramide enrichment in GDM, likely due to an insulin-dependent increase in ceramide-degrading ASAH1 expression.ConclusionsPlacental mitochondrial fusion is enhanced in GDM, possibly as a compensatory response to maternal and fetal metabolic derangements. Alterations in placental insulin exposure and sphingolipid metabolism are among potential contributing factors. Overall, our results suggest that GDM has profound impacts on placental mitochondrial dynamics and metabolism, with plausible implications for the short-term and long-term health of the offspring.
  • Anoschkin, Jasser (Helsingin yliopisto, 2019)
    Tutkimuksen tavoitteena oli edistää hallitun sydänregeneraatiohoidon löytymistä. Sydäninfarktista paraneminen ilman arpea, vähentäisi infarktien aiheuttamaa tautitaakkaa, pidentäisi infarktipotilaiden elinikää ja parantaisi elämänlaatua. Konkreettisena tavoitteena oli selvittää miten neonataalihiiret, joita käytetään infarktitutkimuksissa, sietävät vatsakalvon sisään annettua injektioina toteutettua Wnt-inhibiittorihoitoa. Wnt inhibiittorina käytettiin XAV-939 yhdistettä. Lisäksi tutkittiin aiheuttaako yhdiste muutoksia neonataalihiirien sydämien histologiaan tai hapenkulutukseen. Pienimolekyylisellä Wnt-inhibiittori XAV-939:llä on arveltu olevan myönteisiä arpikudosta vähentäviä vaikutuksia, mahdollisesti myös sydämen infarktin jälkeisissä sydänvaurioissa. Tutkimuksen aikana annettiin neonataalihiirille (N=104) pistoshoitona kuljetinainetta joko XAV-939 -yhdisteen kanssa tai ilman. Pistoshoito annettiin vatsakalvon sisälle seitsemän päivän ajan, jonka jälkeen hiiret lopetettiin. Lääkkeen kuljettimena toimi joko fysiologinen suolaliuos tai maapähkinäöljy. Hoidon vaikutuksia arvioitiin hiirten kuolleisuuden, kokonaispainon kehityksen, sydämen painon, sydänsolujen mitokondrioiden hapenkulutuksen ja histologian avulla. Hiiret sietivät hoitoa hyvin, yksi hiiri kuoli hoidon aikana. Hiirten painon kehityksessä tai sydämien painoissa lopetushetkellä ei havaittu eroa ryhmien välillä. Lääkemolekyyliryhmissä ja kontrolliryhmissä sydämen histologia oli HE-värjättynä normaali. Sydämien mitokondrioiden hapenkulutustasossa havaittiin laskua verrattuna kontrolliryhmään, kun lääke annettiin sekoitettuna fysiologiseen suolaliuokseen. XAV-939:n liukoisuus tähän vehikkeliin todettiin huonoksi, eikä löydöksestä voi vetää vahvoja johtopäätöksiä ilman lisäselvityksiä. Tuloksia ja kokemuksia voidaan käyttää pohjana pohdittaessa, millä asetelmalla edetään tutkimaan hoidon vaikutuksia hiirillä, joille aiheutetaan myös infarkti. Tutkielman yhteydessä kertyi myös aineistoa hiirten pakastettuina sydäminä ja sydänleikkeinä. Näistä on mahdollisuus teettää myöhemmissä tutkimuksissa esimerkiksi PCR määrityksiä ja erilaisia histologisia värjäyksiä.
  • Isakova, Elena P.; Matushkina, Irina N.; Popova, Tatyana N.; Dergacheva, Darya; Gessler, Natalya N.; Klein, Olga; Semenikhina, Anastasya; Deryabina, Yulia; La Porta, Nicola; Saris, Nils-Eric L. (2020)
    In this study, we evaluated the metabolic profile of the aerobic microorganism of Endomyces magnusii with a complete respiration chain and well-developed mitochondria system during long-lasting cultivation. The yeast was grown in batches using glycerol and glucose as the sole carbon source for a week. The profile included the cellular biological and chemical parameters, which determined the redox status of the yeast cells. We studied the activities of the antioxidant systems (catalases and superoxide dismutases), glutathione system enzymes (glutathione peroxidase and reductase), aconitase, as well as the main enzymes maintaining NADPH levels in the cells (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase) during aging of Endomyces magnusii on two kinds of substrates. We also investigated the dynamics of change in oxidized and reduced glutathione, conjugated dienes, and reactive oxidative species in the cells at different growth stages, including the deep stationary stages. Our results revealed a similar trend in the changes in the activity of all the enzymes tested, which increased 2-4-fold upon aging. The yeast cytosol had a very high reduced glutathione content, 22 times than that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and remained unchanged during growth, whereas there was a 7.5-fold increase in the reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione ratio. The much higher level of reactive oxidative species was observed in the cells in the late and deep stationary phases, especially in the cells using glycerol. Cell aging of the culture grown on glycerol, which promotes active oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria, facilitated the functioning of powerful antioxidant systems (catalases, superoxide dismutases, and glutathione system enzymes) induced by reactive oxidative species. Moreover, it stimulated NADPH synthesis, regulating the cytosolic reduced glutathione level, which in turn determines the redox potential of the yeast cell during the early aging process.
  • Tonttila, Kialiina (Helsingin yliopisto, 2021)
    Respirometry is a polarographic method that provides insights into mitochondrial respiratory capacity – specifically to electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I to V –, mitochondrial integrity and energy metabolism. The limitation of the respiratory measurements has been that it requires freshly isolated mitochondria or tissue sample. Long-term preservation of mitochondrial function in frozen samples has been a considerable challenge, since the membrane integrity of the mitochondria is lost during the freezing process. Thus, samples do not display coupled respiration. However, previous studies have found that despite coupled respiration is impaired the individual ETC complexes and the ability of ETC supercomplexes to consume oxygen are not destroyed due to freezing and thawing. On the basis of this knowledge, recently published article presented a novel protocol that overcomes the damages caused by freeze-thaw cycles. The protocol also enables respiration measurement of ETC complexes I-IV by using Seahorse XF96 Extracellular flux analyzer. In this MSc thesis I modified and optimized the aforementioned protocol for Oroboros O2k high- resolution respirometry using frozen skeletal muscle samples. In addition, this study provides an optimized sample preparation protocol for frozen muscle samples and respiration measurement. The new method broadens the possibilities within mitochondrial respiration studies since Oroboros O2k high-resolution respirometry records results with high sensitivity without limiting the number of substrates used. The possibility to use frozen samples reduces research costs, simplifies logistics and enables retrospective studies with previously stored frozen tissue samples. I also utilized the optimized respiration measurement protocol to study metabolic effects of combined gene therapy in skeletal muscle. This gene therapy mimics the positive effects of exercise by inducing skeletal muscle growth and angiogenesis. The mimicking effect was induced by systemic delivery of adeno-associated viral vectors encoding pro-myostatin and VEGF-B. In previous studies inhibition of myostatin has been connected to compromised oxidative capacity and vascular rarefaction. In contrast, VEGF-B has demonstrated to induce angiogenesis in several tissues. Thus, my hypothesis was that combination gene therapy would result in better mitochondrial function than pro-myostatin alone. Results from this study indicate that moderate inhibition of myostatin signaling by pro-myostatin using rAAV vectors could provide enhancements in ETC function when it is induced independently or combined with rAAV-VEGF-B. This result lays a solid foundation for future research and could provide a new therapeutic option against muscle loss and related metabolic diseases.
  • Uno, Shinpei; Masuya, Takahiro; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Lasham, Jonathan; Haapanen, Outi; Shiba, Tomoo; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Sharma, Vivek; Murai, Masatoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto (2020)
    NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) couples electron transfer from NADH to quinone with proton translocation across the membrane. Quinone reduction is a key step for energy transmission from the site of quinone reduction to the remotely located proton-pumping machinery of the enzyme. Although structural biology studies have proposed the existence of a long and narrow quinone-access channel, the physiological relevance of this channel remains debatable. We investigated here whether complex I in bovine heart submitochondrial particles (SMPs) can catalytically reduce a series of oversized ubiquinones (OS-UQs), which are highly unlikely to transit the narrow channel because their side chain includes a bulky ?block? that is ?13 ? across. We found that some OS-UQs function as efficient electron acceptors from complex I, accepting electrons with an efficiency comparable with ubiquinone-2. The catalytic reduction and proton translocation coupled with this reduction were completely inhibited by different quinone-site inhibitors, indicating that the reduction of OS-UQs takes place at the physiological reaction site for ubiquinone. Notably, the proton-translocating efficiencies of OS-UQs significantly varied depending on their side-chain structures, suggesting that the reaction characteristics of OS-UQs affect the predicted structural changes of the quinone reaction site required for triggering proton translocation. These results are difficult to reconcile with the current channel model; rather, the access path for ubiquinone may be open to allow OS-UQs to access the reaction site. Nevertheless, contrary to the observations in SMPs, OS-UQs were not catalytically reduced by isolated complex I reconstituted into liposomes. We discuss possible reasons for these contradictory results.
  • Thompson, Kyle; Mai, Nicole; Oláhová, Monika; Scialó, Filippo; Formosa, Luke E; Stroud, David A; Garrett, Madeleine; Lax, Nichola Z; Robertson, Fiona M; Jou, Cristina; Nascimento, Andres; Ortez, Carlos; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Hardy, Steven A; He, Langping; Brown, Garry K; Marttinen, Paula; McFarland, Robert; Sanz, Alberto; Battersby, Brendan J; Bonnen, Penelope E; Ryan, Michael T; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia Ma; Lightowlers, Robert N; Taylor, Robert W (2018)
    OXA1, the mitochondrial member of the YidC/Alb3/Oxa1 membrane protein insertase family, is required for the assembly of oxidative phosphorylation complexes IV and V in yeast. However, depletion of human OXA1 (OXA1L) was previously reported to impair assembly of complexes I and V only. We report a patient presenting with severe encephalopathy, hypotonia and developmental delay who died at 5 years showing complex IV deficiency in skeletal muscle. Whole exome sequencing identified biallelic OXA1L variants (c.500507dup, p.(Ser170Glnfs*18) and c.620G>T, p.(Cys207Phe)) that segregated with disease. Patient muscle and fibroblasts showed decreased OXA1L and subunits of complexes IV and V. Crucially, expression of wild-type human OXA1L in patient fibroblasts rescued the complex IV and V defects. Targeted depletion of OXA1L in human cells or Drosophila melanogaster caused defects in the assembly of complexes I, IV and V, consistent with patient data. Immunoprecipitation of OXA1L revealed the enrichment of mtDNA-encoded subunits of complexes I, IV and V. Our data verify the pathogenicity of these OXA1L variants and demonstrate that OXA1L is required for the assembly of multiple respiratory chain complexes.
  • Dhandapani, Praveen K.; Lyyski, Annina M.; Paulin, Lars; Khan, Nahid A.; Suomalainen, Anu; Auvinen, Petri; Dufour, Eric; Szibor, Marten; Jacobs, Howard T. (2019)
    The alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis was previously shown to be expressible in mice and to cause no physiological disturbance under unstressed conditions. Because AOX is known to become activated under some metabolic stress conditions, resulting in altered energy balance, we studied its effects in mice subjected to dietary stress. Wild-type mice (Mus musculus, strain C57BL/6JOlaHsd) fed a high-fat or ketogenic (high-fat, low-carbohydrate) diet show weight gain with increased fat mass, as well as loss of performance, compared with chow-fed animals. Unexpectedly, AOX-expressing mice fed on these metabolically stressful, fat-rich diets showed almost indistinguishable patterns of weight gain and altered body composition as control animals. Cardiac performance was impaired to a similar extent by ketogenic diet in AOX mice as in nontransgenic littermates. AOX and control animals fed on ketogenic diet both showed wide variance in weight gain. Analysis of the gut microbiome in stool revealed a strong correlation with diet, rather than with genotype. The microbiome of the most and least obese outliers reared on the ketogenic diet showed no consistent trends compared with animals of normal body weight. We conclude that AOX expression in mice does not modify physiological responses to extreme diets.
  • Lensu, Sanna; Pariyani, Raghunath; Mäkinen, Elina; Yang, Baoru; Saleem, Wisam; Munukka, Eveliina; Lehti, Maarit; Driuchina, Anastasiia; Linden, Jere; Tiirola, Marja; Lahti, Leo; Pekkala, Satu (2020)
    Understanding the importance of the gut microbiota (GM) in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has raised the hope for therapeutic microbes. We have shown that high hepatic fat content associated with low abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in humans and, further, the administration of F. prausnitzii prevented NAFLD in mice. Here, we aimed at targeting F. prausnitzii by prebiotic xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) to treat NAFLD. First, the effect of XOS on F. prausnitzii growth was assessed in vitro. Then, XOS was supplemented or not with high (HFD, 60% of energy from fat) or low (LFD) fat diet for 12 weeks in Wistar rats (n = 10/group). XOS increased F. prausnitzii growth, having only a minor impact on the GM composition. When supplemented with HFD, XOS ameliorated hepatic steatosis. The underlying mechanisms involved enhanced hepatic beta-oxidation and mitochondrial respiration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (H-1-NMR) analysis of cecal metabolites showed that, compared to the HFD, the LFD group had a healthier cecal short-chain fatty acid profile and on the HFD, XOS reduced cecal isovalerate and tyrosine, metabolites previously linked to NAFLD. Cecal branched-chain fatty acids associated positively and butyrate negatively with hepatic triglycerides. In conclusion, XOS supplementation can ameliorate NAFLD by improving hepatic oxidative metabolism and affecting GM.
  • Konttinen, Henna; Cabral-da-Silva, Mauricio e Castro; Ohtonen, Sohvi; Wojciechowski, Sara; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Caligola, Simone; Giugno, Rosalba; Ishchenko, Yevheniia; Hernández, Damián; Fazaludeen, Mohammad Feroze; Eamen, Shaila; Budia, Mireia Gómez; Fagerlund, Ilkka; Scoyni, Flavia; Korhonen, Paula; Huber, Nadine; Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Hewitt, Alex W.; Vickers, James; Smith, Grady C.; Oksanen, Minna; Graff, Caroline; Kanninen, Katja M.; Lehtonen, Sarka; Propson, Nicholas; Schwartz, Michael P.; Pébay, Alice; Koistinaho, Jari; Ooi, Lezanne; Malm, Tarja (2019)
    Summary Here we elucidate the effect of Alzheimer disease (AD)-predisposing genetic backgrounds, APOE4, PSEN1ΔE9, and APPswe, on functionality of human microglia-like cells (iMGLs). We present a physiologically relevant high-yield protocol for producing iMGLs from induced pluripotent stem cells. Differentiation is directed with small molecules through primitive erythromyeloid progenitors to re-create microglial ontogeny from yolk sac. The iMGLs express microglial signature genes and respond to ADP with intracellular Ca2+ release distinguishing them from macrophages. Using 16 iPSC lines from healthy donors, AD patients and isogenic controls, we reveal that the APOE4 genotype has a profound impact on several aspects of microglial functionality, whereas PSEN1ΔE9 and APPswe mutations trigger minor alterations. The APOE4 genotype impairs phagocytosis, migration, and metabolic activity of iMGLs but exacerbates their cytokine secretion. This indicates that APOE4 iMGLs are fundamentally unable to mount normal microglial functionality in AD.