Browsing by Subject "mortality"

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  • Vakkilainen, Svetlana; Taskinen, Mervi; Klemetti, Paula; Pukkala, Eero; Mäkitie, Outi (2019)
    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a skeletal dysplasia with combined immunodeficiency, variable clinical course and increased risk of malignancy. Management of CHH is complicated by a paucity of long-term follow-up data, as well as knowledge on prognostic factors. We assessed clinical course and risk factors for mortality in a prospective cohort study of 80 patients with CHH recruited in 1985-1991 and followed up until 2016. For all patients we collected additional health information from health records and from the national Medical Databases and Cause-of-death Registry. The primary outcome was immunodeficiency-related death, including death from infections, lung disease and malignancy. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated using national mortality rates as reference. Half of the patients (57%, n = 46) manifested no symptoms of immunodeficiency during follow-up while 19% (n = 15) and 24% (n = 19) demonstrated symptoms of humoral or combined immunodeficiency, including six cases of adult-onset immunodeficiency. In a significant proportion of patients (17/79, 22%), clinical features of immunodeficiency progressed over time. Of the 15 patients with non-skin cancer, eight had no preceding clinical symptoms of immunodeficiency. Altogether 20 patients had deceased (SMR = 7.0, 95% CI = 4.3-11); most commonly from malignancy (n = 7, SMR = 10, 95% CI = 4.1-21) and lung disease (n = 4, SMR = 46, 95% CI = 9.5-130). Mortality associated with birth length below-4 standard deviation (compared to normal, SMR/SMR ratio = 5.4, 95% CI = 1.5-20), symptoms of combined immunodeficiency (compared to asymptomatic, SMR/SMR ratio= 3.9, 95% CI = 1.3-11), Hirschsprung disease (odds ratio (OR) 7.2, 95% CI = 1.04-55), pneumonia in the first year of life or recurrently in adulthood (OR = 7.6/19, 95% CI = 1.3-43/2.6-140) and autoimmunity in adulthood (OR = 39, 95% CI = 3.5-430). In conclusion, patients with CHH may develop adult-onset immunodeficiency or malignancy without preceding clinical symptoms of immune defect, warranting careful follow-up. Variable disease course and risk factors for mortality should be acknowledged.
  • Van Der Wel, Kjetil A.; Östergren, Olof; Lundberg, Olle; Korhonen, Kaarina; Martikainen, Pekka; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Urhoj, Stine Kjaer (2019)
    Aims: Future research on health inequality relies on data that cover life-course exposure, different birth cohorts and variation in policy contexts. Nordic register data have long been celebrated as a ?gold mine? for research, and fulfil many of these criteria. However, access to and use of such data are hampered by a number of hurdles and bottlenecks. We present and discuss the experiences of an ongoing Nordic consortium from the process of acquiring register data on socio-economic conditions and health in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Methods: We compare experiences of data-acquisition processes from a researcher?s perspective in the four countries and discuss the comparability of register data and the modes of collaboration available to researchers, given the prevailing ethical and legal restrictions. Results: The application processes we experienced were time-consuming, and decision structures were often fragmented. We found substantial variation between the countries in terms of processing times, costs and the administrative burden of the researcher. Concerned agencies differed in policy and practice which influenced both how and when data were delivered. These discrepancies present a challenge to comparative research. Conclusions: We conclude that there are few signs of harmonisation, as called for by previous policy documents and research papers. Ethical vetting needs to be centralised both within and between countries in order to improve data access. Institutional factors that seem to facilitate access to register data at the national level include single storage environments for health and social data, simplified ethical vetting and user guidance.
  • Lemma, Jasmiini; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kyhälä-Valtonen, Hanna; Nieminen, Markku; Salomaa, Veikko; Anttila, Ismo; Kerola, Anne; Rissanen, Harri; Jula, Antti; Koskinen, Seppo (Helsingfors universitet, 2017)
    Aims: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common long-standing arrhythmia in the adult population. This study aimed to assess which factors increase the likelihood of developing AF, and whether AF is associated with worsened survival in the new millennium. Methods: 6299 participants from a nationally representative Finnish health cohort were followed from 2000 to 2014. The mortality and risk of developing AF were analyzed using Cox regression and logistic regression models. Results: The overall prevalence of AF in baseline ECG was 1.5%. During the 13 year follow- up, 16.9% of those without baseline AF and as many as 85% of those with AF at baseline died. AF increased the risk of dying 5-fold in unadjusted and 1.86-fold in adjusted analysis. In addition, age, gender, hypertension, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes and smoking were associated with increased mortality in the Cox regression model. During the first 10 years of follow-up, male gender, age, BMI and alcohol consumption were associated with developing AF. Conclusion: AF is clearly linked with mortality even after the emergence of modern anticoagulation therapy. BMI and alcohol consumption were the only modifiable health factors associated with the development of AF.
  • Lehto, Mika; Mustonen, Katri; Kantonen, Jarmo; Raina, Marko; Heikkinen, Anna-Maria K.; Kauppila, Timo (2019)
    This study, conducted in a Finnish city, examined whether decreasing emergency department (ED) services in an overcrowded primary care ED and corresponding direction to office-hour primary care would guide patients to office-hour visits to general practitioners (GP). This was an observational retrospective study based on a before-and-after design carried out by gradually decreasing ED services in primary care. The interventions were (a) application of ABCDE-triage combined with public guidance on the proper use of EDs, (b) cessation of a minor supplementary ED, and finally (c) application of "reverse triage" with enhanced direction of the public to office-hour services from the remaining ED. The numbers of visits to office-hour primary care GPs in a month were recorded before applying the interventions fully (preintervention period) and in the postintervention period. The putative effect of the interventions on the development rate of mortality in different age groups was also studied as a measure of safety. The total number of monthly visits to office-hour GPs decreased slowly over the whole study period without difference in this rate between pre- and postintervention periods. The numbers of office-hour GP visits per 1000 inhabitants decreased similarly. The rate of monthly visits to office-hour GP/per GP did not change in the preintervention period but decreased in the postintervention period. There was no increase in the mortality in any of the studied age groups (0-19, 20-64, 65+ years) after application of the ED interventions. There is no guarantee that decreasing activity in a primary care ED and consecutive enhanced redirecting of patients to the office-hour primary care systems would shift patients to office-hour GPs. On the other hand, this decrease in the ED activity does not seem to increase mortality either.
  • Kemp, Kirsi Maria; Alakare, Janne; Kätkä, Minna; Lääperi, Mitja; Lehtonen, Lasse; Castren, Maaret (2022)
    Background and importance Emergency Severity Index is a five-level triage tool in the emergency department that predicts the need for emergency department resources and the degree of emergency. However, it is unknown whether this is valid in patients aged greater than or equal to 65 years. Objective The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of the Emergency Severity Index triage system between emergency department patients aged 18-64 and greater than or equal to 65 years. Design, settings, and participants This was a retrospective observational cohort study of adults who presented to a Finnish emergency department between 1 February 2018 and 28 February 2018. All data were collected from electronic health records. Outcome measures and analysis The primary outcome was 3-day mortality. The secondary outcomes were 30-day mortality, hospital admission, high dependency unit or ICU admission, and emergency department length of stay. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and cutoff performances were used to investigate significant associations between triage categories and outcomes. The results of the two age groups were compared. Main results There were 3141 emergency department patients aged 18-64 years and 2370 patients aged greater than or equal to 65 years. The 3-day mortality area under the curve in patients aged greater than or equal to 65 years was greater than that in patients aged 18-64 years. The Emergency Severity Index was associated with high dependency unit/ICU admissions in both groups, with moderate sensitivity [18-64 years: 61.8% (50.9-71.9%); greater than or equal to 65 years: 73.3% (63.5-81.6%)] and high specificity [18-64 years: 93.0% (92.0-93.8%); greater than or equal to 65 years: 90.9% (90.0-92.1%)]. The sensitivity was high and specificity was low for 30-day mortality and hospital admission in both age groups. The emergency department length of stay was the longest in Emergency Severity Index category 3 for both age groups. There was no significant difference in accuracy between age groups for any outcome. Conclusion Emergency Severity Index performed well in predicting high dependency unit/ICU admission rates for both 18-64 years and greater than or equal to 65-year-old patients. It predicted the 3-day mortality for patients aged greater than or equal to 65 years with high accuracy. It was inaccurate in predicting 30-day mortality and hospital admission for both age groups.
  • Petaja, Liisa; Vaara, Suvi; Liuhanen, Sasu; Suojaranta-Ylinen, Raili; Mildh, Leena; Nisula, Sara; Korhonen, Anna-Maija; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Salmenpera, Markku; Pettila, Ville (2017)
    Objectives: Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently after cardiac surgery and is associated with increased mortality. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria for diagnosing AKI include creatinine and urine output values. However, the value of the latter is debated. The authors aimed to evaluate the incidence of AKI after cardiac surgery and the independent association of KDIGO criteria, especially the urine output criterion, and 2.5-year mortality. Design: Prospective, observational, cohort study. Setting: Single-center study in a university hospital. Participants: The study comprised 638 cardiac surgical patients from September 1, 2011, to June 20, 2012. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Hourly urine output, daily plasma creatinine, risk factors for AKI, and variables for EuroSCORE II were recorded. AKI occurred in 183 (28.7%) patients. Patients with AKI diagnosed using only urine output had higher 2.5-year mortality than did patients without AKI (9/53 [17.0%] v 23/455 [5.1%], p = 0.001). AKI was associated with mortality (hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals]: 3.3 [1.8-6.1] for KDIGO I; 5.8 [2.7-12.1] for KDIGO 2; and 7.9 [3.5-17.6]) for KDIGO 3. KDIGO stages and AKI diagnosed using urine output were associated with mortality even after adjusting for mortality risk assessed using EuroSCORE II and risk factors for AKI. Conclusions: AKI diagnosed using only the urine output criterion without fulfilling the creatinine criterion and all stages of AKI were associated with long-term mortality. Preoperatively assessed mortality risk using EuroSCORE II did not predict this AKI-associated mortality. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Mensah-Abrambah, Emmanuel (2005)
    This thesis studies and analyses the effects of the interplay between African Traditional Medicine land Western Medicine on infant health and attempts to restore their health in the Central region of Ghana. The core of the study was to detect parents actions when their infants fell sick as well as measure the socio-economic conditions with infants health. The primary aim however, is to look for parents/social meaning of illness, methods and problems of medication in Ghana and their 1significance in reducing infant mortality. The study is based in Cape Coast, the ancient capital of Ghana, it is descriptive, exploratory and the japproach of my research is qualitative methodology and the principal research method was; unstructured and semi-structured interviews with 50 respondents. Also the materials of the thesis contain secondary sources such as published data from surveys. The study shows that the first people to act with regard to an attempt to restore a child's health may be the parents. The study further shows that people make sense of illness through known; relationships such as, family members, care providers, and known cultural categories such as wichcraft/oracles, and biomedical health care promotions. The study provides evidence to conclude that there are two medical systems in Ghana, African !traditional medicine and Western medicine and the two systems should be allowed to work side by side.
  • Kerola, Anne M.; Kazemi, Amirhossein; Rollefstad, Silvia; Lillegraven, Siri; Sexton, Joseph; Wibetoe, Grunde; Haavardsholm, Espen A.; Kvien, Tore K.; Semb, Anne Grete (2022)
    Objectives To explore mortality and causes of death among Norwegian patients with RA, PsA and axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) compared with the general population by conducting a nationwide registry-based cohort study. Methods Patients with RA, PsA and axSpA were identified from the Norwegian Patient Registry based on ICD-10 codes between 2008 and 2017. Using age as the time variable, all-cause and cause-specific mortality were estimated between 2010 and 2017 with the Kaplan-Meier estimator and the cumulative incidence competing risk method, respectively. Sex-, education level-, health region- and age group-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality were estimated using Cox regression models. Results We identified 36 095 RA, 18 700 PsA and 16 524 axSpA patients (70%, 53% and 45% women, respectively). RA and axSpA were associated with increased all-cause mortality (HR 1.45 [95% CI: 1.41, 1.48] and HR 1.38 [95% CI: 1.28, 1.38], respectively). Women but not men with PsA had a slightly increased mortality rate (HR 1.10 [95% CI: 1.00, 1.21] among women and 1.02 [95% CI: 0.93, 1.11] among men). For all patient groups as well as for the general population, the three leading causes of death were cardiovascular diseases, neoplasms and respiratory diseases. RA patients had increased mortality from all of these causes, while axSpA patients had increased mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Conclusion Even in the era of modern treatments for IJDs, patients with RA and axSpA still have shortened life expectancy. Our findings warrant further attention to the prevention and management of comorbidities.
  • Heinonen, Kari; Puolakka, Tuukka; Salmi, Heli; Boyd, James; Laiho, Mia; Porthan, Kari; Harve-Rytsälä, Heini; Kuisma, Markku (2022)
    Background Ambulance patients are usually transported to the hospital in the emergency medical service (EMS) system. The aim of this study was to describe the non-conveyance practice in the Helsinki EMS system and to report mortality following non-conveyance decisions. Methods All prehospital patients >= 16 years attended by the EMS but not transported to a hospital during 2013-2017 were included in the study. EMS mission- and patient-related factors were collected and examined in relation to patient death within 30 days of the EMS non-conveyance decision. Results The EMS performed 324,207 missions with a patient during the study period. The patient was not transported in 95,909 (29.6%) missions; 72,233 missions met the study criteria. The patient mean age (standard deviation) was 59.5 (22.5) years; 55.5% of patients were female. The most common dispatch codes were malaise (15.0%), suspected decline in vital signs (14.0%), and falling over (12.9%). A total of 960 (1.3%) patients died within 30 days after the non-conveyance decision. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality was associated with the patient's inability to walk (odds ratio 3.19, 95% confidence interval 2.67-3.80), ambulance dispatch due to shortness of breath (2.73, 2.27-3.27), decreased level of consciousness (2.72, 1.75-4.10), decreased blood oxygen saturation (2.64, 2.27-3.06), and abnormal systolic blood pressure (2.48, 1.79-3.37). Conclusion One-third of EMS missions did not result in patient transport to the hospital. Thirty-day mortality was 1.3%. Abnormalities in multiple respiratory-related vital signs were associated with an increased likelihood of death within 30 days.
  • Raubenheimer, Marie-Claire (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    Oil spillages represent a serious environmental hazard for flora and fauna of marine and coastal ecosystems. Though marine oil spills have decreased since the 1970s, the increasing production of petroleum goods remains a potential source of pollution due to its use and transportation. When aquatic organisms, including fish, are exposed to toxic oil compounds, this can cause sublethal morphological changes and increase mortality. In this context, herring have been frequently studied, and results suggest that particularly herrings eggs and larvae are highly susceptible to oil toxicity. In this thesis, a Bayesian meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the effects of crude and fuel oil on the mortality of herring eggs from the genus Clupea. Observations from laboratory studies, collected during a literature review, served as input for the statistical analysis. To this end, Bayesian inference modeling was applied to generate posterior probability distributions for additional mortality caused by exposure to oil mixtures. Also, oil concentration, oil type, exposure time, and temperature were analyzed to study possible correlations with mortality impacts. The results of this study suggest that acute mortality of exposed herring eggs is similar to mortality observed for individuals exposed to only small concentrations or none at all. Of all evaluated oil types, medium grade crude oil caused the most significant change in instantaneous mortality with increasing oil concentration. Generally, distinct oil types had a greater influence on mortality outcomes than temperatures at the given concentrations. For the lowest temperatures, some correlations for increased mortality were found. Overall, the unexplained variability between the reviewed studies has a relatively small influence on mortality outcomes. In conclusion, the mortality of exposed herrings eggs is most likely delayed due to sublethal effects, rather than immediate, at the modeled concentrations. Altogether, uncertainty amongst the posterior probability distributions is high, indicating a wide possibility range for the monitored parameters' actual values. The reasons for elevated uncertainty likely stem from diverse experimental setups, biological differences between tested species, relatively small sample sizes, and model-related issues. Thus, future research could consider additional variables, information from observational studies and other fish species to reduce uncertainty in mortality outcomes.
  • Kumpula, Eeva-Katri (Helsingfors universitet, 2009)
    Anticholinergic medicines are commonly used to treat e.g. incontinence. These medicines have side effects, which may cause and also exacerbate e.g. dryness of the mouth, increased heart rate, and even cognitive impairment. Older people may be more at risk for these side effects as they may be experiencing similar symptoms as a natural effect of aging, and because they may be using several medicines causing these effects. Older people often have a high medicine burden and also a high disease burden. Measuring anticholinergic effects to change medicine regimens and to reduce the symptoms is difficult as there is no golden standard method. This thesis investigated the published methods available for estimating anticholinergic burden in the literature review part, and used one anticholinergic scoring system, the Anticholinergic Risk Scale, in a cross-sectional study to test the effects of anticholinergics on mortality in 1004 older institutionalised patients from Helsinki area public hospitals. Cross-tabulations and Kruskal-Wallis or Chi square methods were used to detect differences between variables such as nutritional status or certain diagnoses when the patients were stratified according to their anticholinergic use. Cox Proportional Hazard regression, the logrank test and Kaplan-Meier curve were used to investigate the effects of anticholinergics on 5-year all-cause mortality. An in vitro serum assay and seven anticholinergic scoring systems were identified in the literature search. Also, 17 anticholinergic lists were identified, which covered 278 medicines, of which 21 appeared on at least eight of the lists. In the empirical study, the women's (n = 745) mean (± SD) age was 83.35 (± 9.99) years, and they were older than the men (n = 241, mean age ± SD 75.11 ± 11.48, p < 0.001). The 1004 patients (response rate 70 %) were using a mean (± SD) number of 7.1 ± 3.4 regular medicines (range 0-20). 455 patients used no anticholinergics, 363 had some anticholinergic burden (score 1 or 2), and 186 had a high burden, with anticholinergic scores of 3 or more. The mean ARS score (± SD) was 1.2 ± 1.5 (range 0-10). When three anticholinergic lists were compared, all three lists identified only 280/791 of patients who were anticholinergic users according to at least one list. No association was found between anticholinergic medicine use and mortality. There are several methods available for measuring anticholinergic burden, but there is a need for a consensus method. This was highlighted by the lack of agreement on medicines on different lists and when three anticholinergic lists tested identified different patients when compared to each other. Anticholinergic use was common in this frail, older patient sample, but no effect on mortality was shown in this study setting. The cross-sectional nature of the data limits the reliability of the study, and any conclusions beyond older patients in Helsinki area must be done very cautiously. Future research should define anticholinergics better and investigate their possible effect on mortality in a prospective, randomised, and controlled setting.
  • The FinnDiane Study Group; Jansson Sigfrids, Fanny; Stechemesser, Lars; Dahlström, Emma H.; Forsblom, Carol M.; Harjutsalo, Valma; Weitgasser, Raimund; Taskinen, Marja Riitta; Groop, Per Henrik (2022)
    Objectives: We studied apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) in relation to diabetic kidney disease (DKD), cardiovascular outcomes, and mortality in type 1 diabetes. Methods: The cohort comprised 3966 participants from the prospective observational Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study. Progression of DKD was determined from medical records. A major adverse cardiac event (MACE) was defined as acute myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, stroke, or cardiovascular mortality through 2017. Cardiovascular and mortality data were retrieved from national registries. Results: ApoC-III predicted DKD progression independent of sex, diabetes duration, blood pressure, HbA1c, smoking, LDL-cholesterol, lipid-lowering medication, DKD category, and remnant cholesterol (hazard ratio [HR] 1.43 [95% confidence interval 1.05–1.94], p = 0.02). ApoC-III also predicted the MACE in a multivariable regression analysis; however, it was not independent of remnant cholesterol (HR 1.05 [0.81–1.36, p = 0.71] with remnant cholesterol; 1.30 [1.03–1.64, p = 0.03] without). DKD-specific analyses revealed that the association was driven by individuals with albuminuria, as no link between apoC-III and the outcome was observed in the normal albumin excretion or kidney failure categories. The same was observed for mortality: Individuals with albuminuria had an adjusted HR of 1.49 (1.03–2.16, p = 0.03) for premature death, while no association was found in the other groups. The highest apoC-III quartile displayed a markedly higher risk of MACE and death than the lower quartiles; however, this nonlinear relationship flattened after adjustment. Conclusions: The impact of apoC-III on MACE risk and mortality is restricted to those with albuminuria among individuals with type 1 diabetes. This study also revealed that apoC-III predicts DKD progression, independent of the initial DKD category.
  • Tynjälä, Anniina; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Gordin, Daniel; Harjutsalo, Valma (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    The fact that individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease and premature death, can only partly be explained by traditional risk factors. Interestingly, T1D is accompanied by arterial stiffening that correlates with microvascular and macrovascular complications. The aim of this study was to find out whether arterial stiffness predicts all-cause mortality in individuals with T1D. Augmentation index (AIx), a measure of arterial pulse wave reflections, is used to estimate stiffness in the resistance arteries and can be determined non-invasively from pulse wave analysis by applanation tonometry. The data consisted of 906 individuals with T1D from the FinnDiane Study that have been examined for arterial stiffness, cardiovascular risk factors and diabetic complications at baseline between 2001 and 2015. After a median follow-up of 8.2 (5.7-9.7) years, 67 individuals had died according to mortality data from Statistics Finland. They had higher baseline AIx (28 [21-33] vs. 19 [9-27] %, P < 0.001) compared to those alive. This association was independent of related risk factors (age, sex, BMI, HbA1c, triglycerides, renal function and past cardiovascular events) in Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio 1.042 [1.007-1.078], P = 0.017). Arterial stiffness estimated by AIx independently predicted all-cause mortality in T1D. Promising pharmacological agents counteracting arterial stiffness include inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2, and research data on their effect in individuals with T1D is constantly growing. Our finding suggests that detecting early arterial stiffening individuals with T1D could be useful in targeting a more aggressive treatment for high-risk individuals.
  • Liljestrand, J. M.; Salminen, A.; Lahdentausta, L.; Paju, S.; Mäntylä, P.; Buhlin, K.; Tjäderhane, L.; Sinisalo, J.; Pussinen, P. J. (2021)
  • Fallenius, Marika (Helsingfors universitet, 2016)
    Liberal use of oxygen after brain insults remains controversial. We studied whether high arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) is associated with decreased long-term survival in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) treated in the intensive care unit (ICU). Adult patients treated for ICH in Finnish ICUs in 2003-2012 were included in the study. Patients were divided into high (>150mmHg), intermediate (97.5-150mmHg), and low (<97.5mmHg) PaO2 groups according to the lowest measured PaO2/FiO2-ratio during the first 24 hours after ICU admission. In univariate analysis, patients in the high PaO2 group had a significantly increased risk of six-month death compared with the low group (OR 1.82; 95%CI,1.36–2.42;p<0.001), but this statistically significant relation was lost after controlling for case mix in multivariate analysis (OR 1.10; 95%CI,0.76–1.60;p=0.598). No significant relation between PaO2 levels and long-term mortality was found. The clinical role of hyperoxemia in ICU-treated ICH patients remains controversial and warrants further studies.
  • Hänninen, Mikko; Jäntti, Toni; Tolppanen, Heli; Segersvärd, Heli; Tarvasmäki, Tuukka; Lassus, Johan; Vausort, Melanie; Devaux, Yvan; Sionis, Alessandro; Tikkanen, Ilkka; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Lakkisto, Päivi (2020)
    Cardiogenic shock (CS) is a life-threatening emergency. New biomarkers are needed in order to detect patients at greater risk of adverse outcome. Our aim was to assess the characteristics of miR-21-5p, miR-122-5p, and miR-320a-3p in CS and evaluate the value of their expression levels in risk prediction. Circulating levels of miR-21-5p, miR-122-5p, and miR-320a-3p were measured from serial plasma samples of 179 patients during the first 5-10 days after detection of CS, derived from the CardShock study. Acute coronary syndrome was the most common cause (80%) of CS. Baseline (0 h) levels of miR-21-5p, miR-122-5p, and miR-320a-3p were all significantly elevated in nonsurvivors compared to survivors (p <0.05 for all). Above median levels at 0h of each miRNA were each significantly associated with higher lactate and alanine aminotransferase levels and decreased glomerular filtration rates. After adjusting the multivariate regression analysis with established CS risk factors, miR-21-5p and miR-320a-3p levels above median at 0 h were independently associated with 90-day all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1-3.0), p = 0.018; adjusted hazard ratio 1.9 (95% confidence interval 1.2-3.2), p = 0.009, respectively). In conclusion, circulating plasma levels of miR-21-5p, miR-122-5p, and miR-320a-3p at baseline were all elevated in nonsurvivors of CS and associated with markers of hypoperfusion. Above median levels of miR-21-5p and miR-320a-3p at baseline appear to independently predict 90-day all-cause mortality. This indicates the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers for risk assessment in cardiogenic shock.
  • Løhmann, Ditte J. A.; Asdahl, Peter H.; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin; Jónsson, Ólafur G.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Koskenvuo, Minna; Lausen, Birgitte; De Moerloose, Barbara; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Sung, Lillian; Hasle, Henrik (2019)
    Background Associations between body mass index (BMI), outcome, and leukemia-related factors in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unclear. We investigated associations between pretherapeutic BMI, cytogenetic abnormalities, and outcome in a large multinational cohort of children with AML. Methods We included patients, age 2-17 years, diagnosed with de novo AML from the five Nordic countries (2004-2016), Hong Kong (2007-2016), the Netherlands and Belgium (2010-2016), and Canada and USA (1995-2012). BMI standard deviations score for age and sex was calculated and categorized according to the World Health Organization. Cumulative incidence functions, Kaplan-Meier estimator, Cox regression, and logistic regression were used to investigate associations. Results In total, 867 patients were included. The median age was 10 years (range 2-17 years). At diagnosis, 32 (4%) were underweight, 632 (73%) were healthy weight, 127 (15%) were overweight, and 76 (9%) were obese. There was no difference in relapse risk, treatment-related mortality or overall mortality across BMI groups. The frequency of t(8;21) and inv(16) increased with increasing BMI. For obese patients, the sex, age, and country adjusted odds ratio of having t(8;21) or inv(16) were 1.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-3.4) and 2.8 (95% CI 1.3-5.8), respectively, compared to healthy weight patients. Conclusions This study did not confirm previous reports of associations between overweight and increased treatment-related or overall mortality in children. Obesity was associated with a higher frequency of t(8;21) and inv(16). AML cytogenetics appear to differ by BMI status.
  • Salmon, Yann; Torres-Ruiz, Jose M.; Poyatos, Rafael; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Meir, Patrick; Cochard, Herve; Mencuccini, Maurizio (2015)
    Understanding physiological processes involved in drought-induced mortality is important for predicting the future of forests and for modelling the carbon and water cycles. Recent research has highlighted the variable risks of carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in drought-exposed trees. However, little is known about the specific responses of leaves and supporting twigs, despite their critical role in balancing carbon acquisition and water loss. Comparing healthy (non-defoliated) and unhealthy (defoliated) Scots pine at the same site, we measured the physiological variables involved in regulating carbon and water resources. Defoliated trees showed different responses to summer drought compared with non-defoliated trees. Defoliated trees maintained gas exchange while non-defoliated trees reduced photosynthesis and transpiration during the drought period. At the branch scale, very few differences were observed in non-structural carbohydrate concentrations between health classes. However, defoliated trees tended to have lower water potentials and smaller hydraulic safety margins. While non-defoliated trees showed a typical response to drought for an isohydric species, the physiology appears to be driven in defoliated trees by the need to maintain carbon resources in twigs. These responses put defoliated trees at higher risk of branch hydraulic failure and help explain the interaction between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in dying trees.
  • Sykora, M.; Putaala, J.; Meretoja, A.; Tatlisumak, T.; Strbian, D. (2018)
    BackgroundBeta-blocker therapy has been suggested to have neuroprotective properties in the setting of acute stroke; however, the evidence is weak and contradictory. We aimed to examine the effects of pre-admission therapy with beta-blockers (BB) on the mortality following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). MethodsRetrospective analysis of the Helsinki ICH Study database. ResultsA total of 1013 patients with ICH were included in the analysis. Patients taking BB were significantly older, had a higher premorbid mRS score, had more DNR orders, and more comorbidities as atrial fibrillation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, and heart failure. After adjustment for age, pre-existing comorbidities, and prior use of antithrombotic and antihypertensive medications, no differences in in-hospital mortality (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.7), 12-month mortality (OR 1.3, 95% CI 0.9-1.9), and 3-month mortality (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8-1.7) emerged. ConclusionPre-admission use of BB was not associated with mortality after ICH.
  • Heliste, Maria; Pettilä, Ville; Berger, David; Jakob, Stephan M.; Wilkman, Erika (2022)
    Background Critical illness may lead to activation of the sympathetic system. The sympathetic stimulation may be further increased by exogenous catecholamines, such as vasopressors and inotropes. Excessive adrenergic stress has been associated with organ dysfunction and higher mortality. beta-Blockers may reduce the adrenergic burden, but they may also compromise perfusion to vital organs thus worsening organ dysfunction. To assess the effect of treatment with beta-blockers in critically ill adults, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Materials and methods We conducted a search from three major databases: Ovid Medline, the Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials and Scopus database. Two independent reviewers screened, selected, and assessed the included articles according to prespecified eligibility criteria. We assessed risk of bias of eligible articles according to the Cochrane guidelines. Quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Results Sixteen randomized controlled trials comprising 2410 critically ill patients were included in the final review. A meta-analysis of 11 trials including 2103 patients showed a significant reduction in mortality in patients treated with beta-blockers compared to control (risk ratio 0.65, 95%CI 0.53-0.79; p < .0001). There was no significant difference in mean arterial pressure or vasopressor load. Quality of life, biventricular ejection fraction, blood lactate levels, cardiac biomarkers and mitochondrial function could not be included in meta-analysis due to heterogenous reporting of outcomes. Conclusions In this systematic review we found that beta-blocker treatment reduced mortality in critical illness. Use of beta-blockers in critical illness thus appears safe after initial hemodynamic stabilization. High-quality RCT's are needed to answer the questions concerning optimal target group of patients, timing of beta-blocker treatment, choice of beta-blocker, and choice of physiological and hemodynamic parameters to target during beta-blocker treatment in critical illness. KEY MESSAGES A potential outcome benefit of beta-blocker treatment in critical illness exists according to the current review and meta-analysis. Administration of beta-blockers to resuscitated patients in the ICU seems safe in terms of hemodynamic stability and outcome, even during concomitant vasopressor administration. However, further studies, preferably large RCTs on beta-blocker treatment in the critically ill are needed to answer the questions concerning timing and choice of beta-blocker, patient selection, and optimal hemodynamic targets.