Browsing by Subject "mosses"

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  • Kaasalainen, Ulla Susanna; Heinrichs, Jochen; Renner, Matthew; Hedenäs, Lars; Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons; Lee, Gaik; Ignatov, Michael; Rikkinen, Jouko; Schmidt, Alexander (2018)
    Fossil tree resins preserve a wide range of animals, plants, fungi and microorganisms in microscopic fidelity. Fossil organisms preserved in an individual piece of amber lived at the same time in Earth history and mostly even in the same habitat, but they were not necessarily parts of the same interacting community. Here, we report on an in situ preserved corticolous community from a piece of Miocene Dominican amber which is composed of a lichen, a moss and three species of leafy liverworts. The lichen is assigned to the extant genus Phyllopsora (Ramalinaceae, Lecanoromycetes) and is described as P. magna Kaasalainen, Rikkinen & A. R. Schmidt sp. nov. The moss, Aptychellites fossilis Schaf.-Verw., Hedenas, Ignatov & Heinrichs gen. & sp. nov., closely resembles the extant genus Aptychella of the family Pylaisiadelphaceae. The three leafy liverworts comprise the extinct Lejeuneaceae species Cheilolejeunea antiqua (Grolle) Ye & Zhu, 2010 and Lejeunea miocenica Heinrichs, Schaf.-Verw., M. A. M. Renner & G. E. Lee sp. nov. and the extinct Radulaceae species Radula intecta M. A. M. Renner, Schaf.-Verw. & Heinrichs sp. nov. The presence of five associated extinct cryptogam species, four of which belong to extant genera, further substantiates the notion of a stasis in morphotype diversity, but a certain turnover of species, in the Caribbean since the early Miocene.
  • Hodgetts, N. G.; Söderström, Lars; Blockeel, T. L.; Caspari, S.; Ignatov, M.S; Konstantinova, Nadezhda A.; Lockhart, N.; Papp, B.; Schröck, C.; Sim-Sim, M.; Bell, D.; Blom, H.; Bruggeman-Nannenga, M. A; Brugues, M; Enroth, Johannes; Garilleti, R.; Flatberg, K. I; Hedenäs, L; Holyoak, D. T; Hugonnot, V; Kariyawasam, I.; Köckinger, H.; Kucera, J.; Lara, F.; Porley, R. D. (2020)
    Introduction. Following on from work on the European bryophyte Red List, the taxonomically and nomenclaturally updated spreadsheets used for that project have been expanded into a new checklist for the bryophytes of Europe. Methods. A steering group of ten European bryologists was convened, and over the course of a year, the spreadsheets were compared with previous European checklists, and all changes noted. Recent literature was searched extensively. A taxonomic system was agreed, and the advice and expertise of many European bryologists sought. Key results. A new European checklist of bryophytes, comprising hornworts, liverworts and mosses, is presented. Fifteen new combinations are proposed. Conclusions. This checklist provides a snapshot of the current European bryophyte flora in 2019. It will already be out-of-date on publication, and further research, particularly molecular work, can be expected to result in many more changes over the next few years.
  • Kellomäki, Seppo; Hari, Pertti; Väisänen, Eero (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1977)
  • Köster, Kajar; Köster, Egle; Berninger, Frank; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Pumpanen, Jukka (2018)
    Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.) is considered to be an important mammalian herbivore, strongly influencing Arctic lichen-dominated ecosystems. There is no wide knowledge about the effect of reindeer on greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in northern boreal forests. Ground vegetation plays an important role in absorbing nitrogen (N) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. Lately, it has also been found to be a significant source of nitrous oxide (N2O) and a small source of methane (CH4). We investigated the influence of reindeer grazing on field layer GHG (CO2, CH4, and N2O) fluxes, ground vegetation coverage and biomass, and soil physical properties (temperature and moisture) in a northern boreal forest. At our study site, the reindeer-induced replacement of lichen by mosses had contrasting effects on the GHG fluxes originating from the field layer. Field layer CO2 efflux was significantly higher in grazed areas. The field layer was a CH4 sink in all areas, but grazed areas absorbed more CH4 compared to non-grazed areas. Although total N2O fluxes remained around 0 in grazed areas, a small N2O sink occurred in non-grazed areas with lower moss biomass. Our results indicated that grazing by reindeer in northern boreal forests affects GHG fluxes from the forest field layer both positively and negatively, and these emissions largely depend on grazing-induced changes in vegetation composition.
  • Ribeiro Moreira de Assumpção, Christine (Helsingin yliopisto, 2017)
    Biochar is a product from the pyrolysis of plant derived-biomass and it is intended to be applied to soil given its potential of carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvement. Some studies also suggest that increasing application rate of biochar has a positive feedback on biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and on soil microbial biomass. However, these effects are not well known for boreal forests. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different biochar application rates: 0 t ha-1, 5 t ha-1 and 10 t ha-1 on BNF, on microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen (MBC and MBN), and on moss biomass. The field experiment was established in Juupajoki, Southern Finland in young Scots pine stands. The stands were amended with biochar one year before the measurements took place. BNF was determined using acetylene reduction assay (ARA), and microbial biomass was estimated using chloroform fumigation-direct extraction (CFDE). The microbial biomass samples were incubated at the temperatures: 10 °C, 15 °C and 20 °C. Biochar amendment raised soil pH, whereas no differences were verified for BNF, MBC, MBN, nor for moss biomass. There was, however, variation in the response of N fixation to incubation temperature, and variation in the response of MBC and MBN to the time of measurement. Observed changes in pH are often likely to justify variations in the rates of BNF and MB, however in this study they were not shown to be of significance. It is possible, however that biochar will have a positive effect on soil vegetation as it is incorporated into the soil in the long-term. Although this study focuses on BNF and MB, the findings may well have a bearing on the use of biochar as a tool for C sequestration, since amendment with biochar was demonstrated as neither beneficial nor harmful to the soil biota.
  • Kasimir, Å; He, H.; Jansson, P-E; Lohila, A.; Minkkinen, K. (2021)
    Nutrient-rich peat soils have previously been demonstrated to lose carbon despite higher photosynthesis and litter production compared to nutrient-poor soils, where instead carbon accumulates. To understand this phenomenon, we used a process-oriented model (CoupModel) calibrated on data from two closely located drained peat soil sites in boreal forests in Finland, Kalevansuo and Lettosuo, with different soil C/N ratios. Uncertainty-based calibrations were made using eddy-covariance data (hourly values of net ecosystem exchange) and tree growth data. The model design used two forest scenarios on drained peat soil, one nutrient-poor with dense moss cover and another with lower soil C/N ratio with sparse moss cover. Three vegetation layers were assumed: conifer trees, other vascular plants, and a bottom layer with mosses. Adding a moss layer was a new approach, because moss has a modified physiology compared to vascular plants. The soil was described by three separate soil organic carbon (SOC) pools consisting of vascular plants and moss litter origin and decomposed organic matter. Over 10 years, the model demonstrated a similar photosynthesis rate for the two scenarios, 903 and 1,034 g C m(-2) yr(-1), for the poor and rich site respectively, despite the different vegetation distribution. For the nutrient-rich scenario more of the photosynthesis produce accumulated as plant biomass due to more trees, while the poor site had abundant moss biomass which did not increase living aboveground biomass to the same degree. Instead, the poor site showed higher litter inputs, which compared with litter from vascular plants had low turnover rates. The model calibration showed that decomposition rate coefficients for the three SOC pools were similar for the two scenarios, but the high quantity of moss litter input with low decomposability for the nutrient poor scenario explained the major difference in the soil carbon balance. Vascular plant litter declined with time, while SOC pools originating from mosses accumulated with time. Large differences between the scenarios were obtained during dry spells where soil heterotrophic respiration doubled for the nutrient-rich scenario, where vascular plants dominated, owing to a larger water depletion by roots. Where moss vegetation dominated, the heterotrophic respiration increased by only 50% during this dry period. We suggest moss vegetation is key for carbon accumulation in the poor soil, adding large litter quantities with a resistant quality and less water depletion than vascular plants during dry conditions.
  • Koponen, Timo; Isoviita, Pekka; Lammes, Tapio (Societas pro fauna et flora Fennica, 1977)
    Flora Fennica; 6