Browsing by Subject "myosin"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-2 of 2
  • Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Lehtimäki, Jaakko I.; Acheva, Anna; Schaible, Niccole; Lappalainen, Pekka; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Tojkander, Sari (2020)
    Summary Defects in the maintenance of intercellular junctions are associated with loss of epithelial barrier function and consequent pathological conditions, including invasive cancers. Epithelial integrity is dependent on actomyosin bundles at adherens junctions, but the origin of these junctional bundles is incompletely understood. Here we show that peripheral actomyosin bundles can be generated from a specific actin stress fiber subtype, transverse arcs, through their lateral fusion at cell-cell contacts. Importantly, we find that assembly and maintenance of peripheral actomyosin bundles are dependent on the mechanosensitive CaMKK2/AMPK signaling pathway and that inhibition of this route leads to disruption of tension-maintaining actomyosin bundles and re-growth of stress fiber precursors. This results in redistribution of cellular forces, defects in monolayer integrity, and loss of epithelial identity. These data provide evidence that the mechanosensitive CaMKK2/AMPK pathway is critical for the maintenance of peripheral actomyosin bundles and thus dictates cell-cell junctions through cellular force distribution.
  • Nevzorov, Ilja; Sidorenko, Ekaterina; Wang, Weihuan; Zhao, Hongxia; Vartiainen, Maria K (2018)
    Accurate control of macromolecule transport between nucleus and cytoplasm underlines several essential biological processes, including gene expression. According to the canonical model, nuclear import of soluble proteins is based on nuclear localization signals and transport factors. We challenge this view by showing that nuclear localization of the actin-dependent motor protein Myosin-1C (Myo1C) resembles the diffusion–retention mechanism utilized by inner nuclear membrane proteins. We show that Myo1C constantly shuttles in and out of the nucleus and that its nuclear localization does not require soluble factors, but is dependent on phosphoinositide binding. Nuclear import of Myo1C is preceded by its interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum, and phosphoinositide binding is specifically required for nuclear import, but not nuclear retention, of Myo1C. Our results therefore demonstrate, for the first time, that membrane association and binding to nuclear partners is sufficient to drive nuclear localization of also soluble proteins, opening new perspectives to evolution of cellular protein sorting mechanisms.