Browsing by Subject "older people"

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  • Blain, H.; Masud, T.; Dargent-Molina, P.; Martin, F. C.; Rosendahl, E.; van der Velde, N.; Bousquet, J.; Benetos, A.; Cooper, C.; Kanis, J. A.; Reginster, J. Y.; Rizzoli, R.; Cortet, B.; Barbagallo, M.; Dreinhofer, K. E.; Vellas, B.; Maggi, S.; Strandberg, T.; EUGMS Falls Fracture Interest Grp; Int Assoc Gerontology Geriatri; European Union Med Specialists EUM; Fragility Fracture Network FFN; European Soc Clinical Econ Aspects; Int Osteoporosis Fdn IOF (2016)
    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest Group on Falls and Fracture Prevention of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS), in collaboration with the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics for the European Region (IAGG-ER), the European Union of Medical Specialists (EUMS), the International Osteoporosis Foundation - European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people.
  • Lemetti, Terhi; Voutilainen, Paivi; Stolt, Minna; Eloranta, Sini; Suhonen, Riitta (2017)
    Introduction: Health care systems for older people are becoming more complex and care for older people, in the transition between hospital and primary healthcare requires more systematic collaboration between nurses. This study describes nurses' perceptions of their collaboration when working between hospital and primary healthcare within the older people care chain. Theory and methods: Using a qualitative approach, informed by grounded theory, six focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of registered nurses (n = 28) from hospitals (n = 14) and primary -healthcare (n = 14) during 2013. The data were analyzed using dimensional analysis. Findings: Four dimensions of collaboration were identified: 1) Context and Situation, 2) Conditions, 3) Processes and Interactions and 4) The Consequences of nurse-to-nurse collaboration within the older people care chain. These four dimensions were then conceptualized into a model of nurse-to-nurse collaboration. Discussion and conclusion: Improved collaboration is useful for the safe, timely and controlled transfer of older people between hospital and primary healthcare organizations and also in healthcare education. The findings in this study of nurse-to-nurse collaboration provides direction and opportunities to improve collaboration and subsequently, the continuity and integration in older people care in the transition between organizations.
  • Inkeri, Niina-Mari; Karjalainen, Merja; Haanpaa, Maija; Kautiainen, Hannu; Saltevo, Juha; Mantyselka, Pekka; Tiihonen, Miia (2019)
    What is known and objective Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Methods The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire. Results and discussion The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms. What is new and conclusion There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
  • Kumpula, Eeva-Katri (Helsingfors universitet, 2009)
    Anticholinergic medicines are commonly used to treat e.g. incontinence. These medicines have side effects, which may cause and also exacerbate e.g. dryness of the mouth, increased heart rate, and even cognitive impairment. Older people may be more at risk for these side effects as they may be experiencing similar symptoms as a natural effect of aging, and because they may be using several medicines causing these effects. Older people often have a high medicine burden and also a high disease burden. Measuring anticholinergic effects to change medicine regimens and to reduce the symptoms is difficult as there is no golden standard method. This thesis investigated the published methods available for estimating anticholinergic burden in the literature review part, and used one anticholinergic scoring system, the Anticholinergic Risk Scale, in a cross-sectional study to test the effects of anticholinergics on mortality in 1004 older institutionalised patients from Helsinki area public hospitals. Cross-tabulations and Kruskal-Wallis or Chi square methods were used to detect differences between variables such as nutritional status or certain diagnoses when the patients were stratified according to their anticholinergic use. Cox Proportional Hazard regression, the logrank test and Kaplan-Meier curve were used to investigate the effects of anticholinergics on 5-year all-cause mortality. An in vitro serum assay and seven anticholinergic scoring systems were identified in the literature search. Also, 17 anticholinergic lists were identified, which covered 278 medicines, of which 21 appeared on at least eight of the lists. In the empirical study, the women's (n = 745) mean (± SD) age was 83.35 (± 9.99) years, and they were older than the men (n = 241, mean age ± SD 75.11 ± 11.48, p < 0.001). The 1004 patients (response rate 70 %) were using a mean (± SD) number of 7.1 ± 3.4 regular medicines (range 0-20). 455 patients used no anticholinergics, 363 had some anticholinergic burden (score 1 or 2), and 186 had a high burden, with anticholinergic scores of 3 or more. The mean ARS score (± SD) was 1.2 ± 1.5 (range 0-10). When three anticholinergic lists were compared, all three lists identified only 280/791 of patients who were anticholinergic users according to at least one list. No association was found between anticholinergic medicine use and mortality. There are several methods available for measuring anticholinergic burden, but there is a need for a consensus method. This was highlighted by the lack of agreement on medicines on different lists and when three anticholinergic lists tested identified different patients when compared to each other. Anticholinergic use was common in this frail, older patient sample, but no effect on mortality was shown in this study setting. The cross-sectional nature of the data limits the reliability of the study, and any conclusions beyond older patients in Helsinki area must be done very cautiously. Future research should define anticholinergics better and investigate their possible effect on mortality in a prospective, randomised, and controlled setting.
  • Tigerstedt, Christoffer; Agahi, Neda; Bye, Elin; Ekholm, Ola; Härkönen, Janne; Jensen, Heidi Rosendahl; Lau, Cathrine Juel; Mäkelä, Pia; Moan, Inger Synnove; Parikka, Suvi; Raninen, Jonas; Vilkko, Anni; Bloomfield, Kim (2020)
    Aim: The present article summarises status and trends in the 21st century in older people's (60-79 years) drinking behaviour in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden and concludes this thematic issue. Each country provided a detailed report analysing four indicators of alcohol use: the prevalence of alcohol consumers, the prevalence of frequent use, typical amounts of use, and the prevalence of heavy episodic drinking (HED). The specific aim of this article is to compare the results of the country reports. Findings: Older people's drinking became more common first in Denmark in the 1970s and then in the other countries by the 1980s. Since 2000 the picture is mixed. Denmark showed decreases in drinking frequency, typically consumed amounts and HED, while in Sweden upward trends were dominant regarding prevalence of consumers and frequency of drinking as well as HED. Finland and Norway displayed both stable indicators except for drinking frequency and proportion of women consumers where trends increased. In all four countries, the gender gap diminished with regard to prevalence and frequency of drinking, but remained stable in regard to consuming large amounts. In Norway the share of alcohol consumers among women aged 60-69 years exceeded the share among men. During the late 2010s, Denmark had the highest prevalence of alcohol consumers as well as the highest proportion drinking at a higher frequency. Next in ranking was Finland, followed by Sweden and Norway. This overall rank ordering was observed for both men and women. Conclusion: As the populations aged 60 years and older in the Nordic countries continue to grow, explanations for the drivers and consequences of changes in older people's drinking will become an increasingly relevant topic for future research. Importantly, people aged 80 years and older should also be included as an integral part of that research.
  • Tigerstedt, Christoffer; Härkönen, Janne; Mäkelä, Pia; Parikka, Suvi; Vilkko, Anni (2020)
    Aim: To analyse prevalence and trends in older people's (60+) alcohol use in Finland in 1993-2018. Data and method: Data on people aged 65+ were obtained from the Health Behaviour and Health among the Finnish Elderly study (HBHFE) for the years 1993-2011 and from its successor the National FinSote Survey for the years 2013-2018. Data for 60-64-year-olds and for the reference group (20-59-year-olds) were obtained from the Health Behaviour and Health among the Finnish Adult Population (HBHFA) study for the years 1993-2011 and from the FinSote study for the years 2013-2018. Four measures were chosen to describe prevalence and trends in drinking patterns in five-year age groups among men and women aged 60+: prevalence of current drinking, prevalence of frequent drinking, typical amounts of drinking and prevalence of heavy episodic drinking (HED). Results: Regarding prevalence of current drinking and frequent drinking, older women have been catching up with men, but older men still consume larger amounts of alcohol per occasion. The long-lasting increase in the prevalence of current drinkers continued in most older female age groups into the 2010s, settled in most older male and some female age groups, and shifted downwards in the oldest male age groups. In most older male and female age groups, the increasing trend in frequent drinking continued to the present. Data on typical amounts consumed and HED were only available for 2013-2018. In that period those measures remained rather stable. Conclusion: More detailed research on drinking patterns among people aged 60+ years is needed for two reasons: older people's drinking is a new cultural phenomenon and alcohol-related social and health harms are increasing in older age groups.
  • Jauhiainen, L.; Mannisto, S.; Ylostalo, P.; Vehkalahti, M.; Nordblad, A.; Turunen, A. W.; Suominen, A. L. (2017)
    To study differences in consumption of foods and intake of nutrients attributable to denture status. Data from a cross-sectional, nationally representative Health 2000 Survey, subjects aged 55-84 years (n=2,241). Denture status (edentulous with full dentures, own dentition with removable dentures, own dentition with no removable dentures) was used as an explanatory variable. The consumption of foods and intake of nutrients was used as an outcome variable and was measured using a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Denture status associated with food choices. Full denture wearers consumed less vegetables (p = 0.013 among men and p = 0.001 among women) and fruits (p = 0.001 among women), more sugary products (p = 0.012 among men and p = 0.008 among women), and their balance in fatty acids was less favourable than among dentate participants. Among dentate participants, the differences between the two groups were small and statistically significant differences were seen mostly in women. Wearing full dentures appears to be associated with unhealthier food choices, lower consumption of some foodstuffs and lower intake of certain nutrients when compared to the food choices of dentate persons.
  • Jyvakorpi, Satu K.; Pitkala, Kaisu H.; Puranen, Taija M.; Bjorkman, Mikko P.; Suominen, Merja H.; Strandberg, Timo E.; Soini, Helena (2017)
  • Valkohaapa, Anna-Mari (Helsingfors universitet, 2014)
    In Finland the elderly residents of long-term care facilities are often prescribed a lot of medications, especially psychotropic drugs. It also happens that a patient or a resident has to be physically or chemically restrained. Chemical restraining can be defined in many ways, for example as using a drug - usually an antipsychotic - to restrict the freedom or movement of a patient and to control his or her behavior. In nursing homes the staff is in a key position when it comes to deciding on the use of chemical restraining or PRN medication. A legislation to guarantee the self-determination of a patient and to define how physical restraining can be used is now being prepared in Finland. Only a few studies on chemical restraining from a nurses' point of view have been made so far. Thus, the aim of this study is to provide more information on the level of knowledge, the attitudes and perceptions of nurses regarding chemical restraining and the effect of those on deciding whether to use chemical restraints or not. Three focus groups with nurses were conducted in Hyvinkää nursing homes (n=13). The groups were recruited both by e-mail and directly from the wards. The focus group discussions were digitally audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The content of the transcripts was then analyzed using a constant comparative method. According to the study most of the antipsychotics used in long-term care were used daily. However, it is not uncommon for the nurses to be unsure about their knowledge on the use of medicines. It is thus important to help the nursing staff to increase their knowledge and skills in pharmacology. The nurses also wished to get extra training for treating people with dementia. The concept of chemical restraining is quite ambiguous, and the use of chemical restraints is a complex ethical issue because the reasons for and effects of administering it vary depending on the situation. The study shows that the chemical restraining is most often considered justified when it is used to ensure the safety of a patient, relieve anxiety or to keep the working conditions of the staff tolerable. Also a shortage of manpower and a request by the family can influence the decision on using chemical restraints. The lack of proper common guidelines causes confusion and wide variation in the use of chemical restraints. Many interviewees were hoping for more open discussion and cooperation on using chemical restraining. The nurses also mentioned many alternatives to rely on instead of using chemical restraints, such as soothing, comforting and creating a safe feeling for the patients, daily routines and stimulus. One of the key factors for taking to these instead of chemical restraints are the manpower resources in the facilities. Educating the staff can also help them to find more options for chemical restraining and make staff members recognize new or remember forgotten routines for caring for the patients without using psychotropic drugs.
  • Lahti, Anna-Maria; Mikkola, Tuija M.; Salonen, Minna; Wasenius, Niko; Sarvimäki, Anneli; Eriksson, Johan G.; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B. (2021)
    Senior houses provide social interaction and support, potentially supporting older people's physical and mental functioning. Few studies have investigated functioning of senior house residents. The aim was to compare functioning between senior house residents and community-dwelling older adults in Finland. We compared senior house residents (n = 336, 69% women, mean age 83 years) to community-dwelling older adults (n = 1139, 56% women, mean age 74 years). Physical and mental functioning were assessed using the SF 36-Item Health Survey. Loneliness and frequency of social contacts were self-reported. The analyses were adjusted for age, socioeconomic factors and diseases. Physical functioning was lower among men in senior houses compared to community-dwelling men (mean 41.1 vs. 46.4, p = 0.003). Mental functioning or the frequency of social contacts did not differ between type of residence in either sex. Loneliness was higher among women in senior houses compared to community-dwelling women (OR = 1.67, p = 0.027). This was not observed in men. Results suggest that women in senior houses had similar physical and mental functioning compared to community-dwelling women. Male senior house residents had poorer physical functioning compared to community-dwelling men. Women living in senior houses were lonelier than community-dwelling women despite the social environment.
  • Forma, Leena Päivikki; Aaltonen, Mari; Raitanen, Jani; Anthun, Kjartan Sarheim; Kalseth, Jorid (2020)
    Aims: This study aimed to find out how place of death varied between countries with different health and social service systems. This was done by investigating typical groups (concerning age, sex and end-of-life trajectory) of older people dying in different places in Finland and Norway. Methods: The data were derived from national registers. All those who died in Finland or Norway at the age of ⩾70 years in 2011 were included. Place of death was analysed by age, sex, end-of-life trajectory and degree of urbanisation of the municipality of residence. Two-proportion z-tests were performed to test the differences between the countries. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed separately for both countries to find the factors associated with place of death. Results: The data consisted of 68,433 individuals. Deaths occurred most commonly in health centres in Finland and in nursing homes in Norway. Deaths in hospital were more common in Norway than they were in Finland. In both countries, deaths in hospital were more common among younger people and men. Deaths in nursing homes were commonest among frail older people, while most of those who had a terminal illness died in health centres in Finland and in nursing homes in Norway. Conclusions: Both Finland and Norway have a relatively low share of hospital deaths among older people. Both countries have developed alternatives to end-of-life care in hospital, allowing for spending the last days or weeks of life closer to home. In Finland, health centres play a key role in end-of-life care, while in Norway nursing homes serve this role.
  • Saarelainen, Suvi-Maria; Vähäkangas, Auli; Anttonen, Mirja Sisko (2020)
    Increasingly more older people are now being cared for in their own homes. Furthermore, it has become more common that people stay at home to receive end-of-life care. Using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), we analyzed the religious experiences of older people (aged 65+). We answered these questions: What kind of religious experiences do older people have when death is approaching? What does this tell us about their religious coping? As IPA is based on the in-depth analysis of small amounts of homogenous data, we analyzed five interviews with older people who were dying. We identified three main themes. First, religious experiences are relational, that is, deeply rooted in personal relationships. Second, religious experiences are real and can provide both struggles and comfort in the last stage of life. Third, the experience of encountering one's mortality and planning for one's death was calming; while many had unclear views on the afterlife, the idea of continuing bonds after death was comforting. More open discussion on religious matters, death, and dying would be welcomed as part of home-based end-of-life care.
  • THE EUROPEAN WORKING GROUP ON SARCOPENIA IN OLDER PEOPLE 2 (EWGSOP2); THE EXTENDED GROUP FOR EWGSOP2; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J.; Bahat, Gülistan; Bauer, Jürgen; Boirie, Yves; Bruyere, Olivier; Cederholm, Tommy; Cooper, C.; Landi, Francesco; Rolland, Yves; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Schneider, Stephane M.; Sieber, Cornel C.; Topinkova, Eva; Vandewoude, Maurits; Visser, Marjolen; Zamboni, Mauro; Pitkälä, Kaisu Hannele (2019)
    Background in 2010, the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) published a sarcopenia definition that aimed to foster advances in identifying and caring for people with sarcopenia. In early 2018, the Working Group met again (EWGSOP2) to update the original definition in order to reflect scientific and clinical evidence that has built over the last decade. This paper presents our updated findings. Objectives to increase consistency of research design, clinical diagnoses and ultimately, care for people with sarcopenia. Recommendations sarcopenia is a muscle disease (muscle failure) rooted in adverse muscle changes that accrue across a lifetime; sarcopenia is common among adults of older age but can also occur earlier in life. In this updated consensus paper on sarcopenia, EWGSOP2: (1) focuses on low muscle strength as a key characteristic of sarcopenia, uses detection of low muscle quantity and quality to confirm the sarcopenia diagnosis, and identifies poor physical performance as indicative of severe sarcopenia; (2) updates the clinical algorithm that can be used for sarcopenia case-finding, diagnosis and confirmation, and severity determination and (3) provides clear cut-off points for measurements of variables that identify and characterise sarcopenia. Conclusions EWGSOP2's updated recommendations aim to increase awareness of sarcopenia and its risk. With these new recommendations, EWGSOP2 calls for healthcare professionals who treat patients at risk for sarcopenia to take actions that will promote early detection and treatment. We also encourage more research in the field of sarcopenia in order to prevent or delay adverse health outcomes that incur a heavy burden for patients and healthcare systems.
  • Luotola, Kari; Jyväkorpi, Satu; Urtamo, Annele; Pitkälä, Kaisu H.; Kivimäki, Mika; Strandberg, Timo E. (2020)
    BACKGROUND: statin treatment has increased also among people aged 80 years and over, but adverse effects potentially promoting frailty and loss of resilience are frequent concerns. METHODS: in the Helsinki Businessmen Study, men born in 1919-34 (original n = 3,490) have been followed up since the 1960s. In 2011, a random subcohort of home-living survivors (n = 525) was assessed using questionnaires and clinical (including identification of phenotypic frailty) and laboratory examinations. A 7-year mortality follow-up ensued. RESULTS: we compared 259 current statin users (median age 82 years, interquartile range 80-85 years) with 266 non-users (83; 80-86 years). Statin users had significantly more multimorbidity than non-users (prevalencies 72.1% and 50.4%, respectively, P < 0.0001) and worse glucose status than non-users (prevalencies of diabetes 19.0% and 9.4%, respectively, P = 0.0008). However, there was no difference in phenotypic frailty (10.7% versus 11.2%, P = 0.27), and statin users had higher plasma prealbumin level than non-users (mean levels 257.9 and 246.3 mg/L, respectively, P = 0.034 adjusted for age, body mass index and C-reactive protein) implying better nutritional status. Despite morbidity difference, age-adjusted 7-year mortality was not different between the two groups (98 and 103 men among users and non-users of statins, respectively, hazard ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.72-1.30). CONCLUSIONS: our study suggests that male octogenarian statin users preserved resilience and survival despite multimorbidity, and this may be associated with better nutritional status among statin users.