Browsing by Subject "p16"

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  • Kettunen, Eeva; Savukoski, Sauli; Salmenkivi, Kaisa; Böhling, Tom; Vanhala, Esa; Kuosma, Eeva; Anttila, Sisko; Wolff, Henrik (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Deletion of the CDKN2A locus is centrally involved in the development of several malignancies. In malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), it is one of the most frequently reported genomic alteration. MPM is strongly associated with a patients’ asbestos exposure. However, the status of CDKN2A and the expression of the corresponding protein, p16, in relation to MPM patient’s asbestos exposure is poorly known. Copy number alterations in 2p16, 9q33.1 and 19p13 have earlier been shown to accumulate in lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure but their status in MPM is unclear. Methods We studied DNA copy numbers for CDKN2A using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and p16 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 92 MPM patients, 75 of which with known asbestos exposure status. We also studied, in MPM, copy number alterations in 2p16, 9q33.1 and 19p13 by FISH. Results We were unable to detect an association between p16 expression and pulmonary asbestos fiber count in MPM tumor cells. However, significantly more MPM patients with high pulmonary asbestos fiber count (> 1 million fibers per gram [f/g]) had stromal p16 immunoreactivity than MPM of patients with low exposure (≤ 0.5 million f/g) (51.4% vs 16.7%; p = 0.035, Chi-Square). We found that an abnormal copy number of CDKN2A in MPM tumor cells associated with a high pulmonary asbestos fiber count (p = 0.044, Fisher’s Exact test, two-tailed). In contrast to our earlier findings in asbestos associated lung cancer, DNA copy number changes in 2p16, 9q33 and 19p13 were not frequent in MPM although single cases with variable copy numbers on those regions were seen. Conclusions We found two instances where the gene locus CDKN2A or its corresponding protein expression, is associated with high asbestos exposure levels. This suggests that there may be biological differences between the mesotheliomas with high pulmonary asbestos fiber count and those with low fiber count.
  • Kettunen, Eeva; Savukoski, Sauli; Salmenkivi, Kaisa; Böhling, Tom; Vanhala, Esa; Kuosma, Eeva; Anttila, Sisko; Wolff, Henrik (2019)
    BackgroundDeletion of the CDKN2A locus is centrally involved in the development of several malignancies. In malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), it is one of the most frequently reported genomic alteration. MPM is strongly associated with a patients' asbestos exposure. However, the status of CDKN2A and the expression of the corresponding protein, p16, in relation to MPM patient's asbestos exposure is poorly known. Copy number alterations in 2p16, 9q33.1 and 19p13 have earlier been shown to accumulate in lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure but their status in MPM is unclear.MethodsWe studied DNA copy numbers for CDKN2A using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and p16 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 92 MPM patients, 75 of which with known asbestos exposure status. We also studied, in MPM, copy number alterations in 2p16, 9q33.1 and 19p13 by FISH.ResultsWe were unable to detect an association between p16 expression and pulmonary asbestos fiber count in MPM tumor cells. However, significantly more MPM patients with high pulmonary asbestos fiber count (>1 million fibers per gram [f/g]) had stromal p16 immunoreactivity than MPM of patients with low exposure ( 0.5 million f/g) (51.4% vs 16.7%; p=0.035, Chi-Square). We found that an abnormal copy number of CDKN2A in MPM tumor cells associated with a high pulmonary asbestos fiber count (p=0.044, Fisher's Exact test, two-tailed). In contrast to our earlier findings in asbestos associated lung cancer, DNA copy number changes in 2p16, 9q33 and 19p13 were not frequent in MPM although single cases with variable copy numbers on those regions were seen.ConclusionsWe found two instances where the gene locus CDKN2A or its corresponding protein expression, is associated with high asbestos exposure levels. This suggests that there may be biological differences between the mesotheliomas with high pulmonary asbestos fiber count and those with low fiber count.
  • Mohamed, Hesham; Haglund, Caj; Jouhi, Lauri; Atula, Timo; Hagström, Jaana; Mäkitie, Antti (2020)
    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is subclassified by the World Health Organization into two different entities: human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative tumors. HPV infection promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and transformation of keratinocyte stem cells into cancer stem cells. EMT is a crucial process in the carcinogenesis of epithelial-derived malignancies, and we aimed to study the role of its markers in OPSCC. This study consists of 202 consecutive OPSCC patients diagnosed and treated with curative intent. We examined E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and vimentin expression using immunohistochemistry and compared these with tumor and patient characteristics and treatment outcome. We found that the cell-membranous expression of beta-catenin was stronger in HPV-positive than in HPV-negative tumors, and it was stronger in the presence of regional metastasis. The stromal vimentin expression was stronger among HPV-positive tumors. A high E-cadherin expression was associated with tumor grade. No relationship between these markers and survival emerged. In conclusion, beta-catenin and vimentin seem to play different roles in OPSCC: the former in the tumor tissue itself, and the latter in the tumor stroma. HPV infection may exploit the beta-catenin and vimentin pathways in carcinogenic process. More, beta-catenin may serve as a marker for the occurrence of regional metastasis:
  • Jouhi, Lauri; Atula, Timo; Mäkitie, Antti; Keski-Santti, Harri (2019)
    PurposeOnly a minority of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) are diagnosed without regional metastasis (cN0). Studies focusing on the management of cN0 neck in OPSCC are scarce.MethodsWe reviewed all OPSCC patients treated at our institution with cN0 neck between 2000 and 2009. The treatment of neck and pattern of regional control was analyzed. Median follow-up was 5years (range 3.5-9.0) or until death.ResultsOf the total 313 OPSCC patients treated within the period, 56 (18%) presented with cN0 neck. Of them, 51 (91%) received completed treatment with curative intent: 46 (90%) underwent elective neck treatment with either neck dissection (chemo)radiotherapy (C)RT (n=23) or (C)RT (n=23). A regional recurrence occurred in three patients (6%) and they all had a p16-negative soft palate midline primary tumor. Two of these patients had received RT on the neck.Conclusions While the overall prognosis of OPSCC is generally favorable and regional recurrences are infrequent, soft palate tumors, that are usually p16 negative, may form an subgroup warranting more aggressive treatment despite the clinical appearance of early stage.
  • Carpen, Timo; Sjöblom, Anni; Lundberg, Marie; Haglund, Caj; Markkola, Antti; Syrjänen, Stina; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Mäkitie, Antti; Hagström, Jaana; Mattila, Petri (2018)
    Objectives: Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is divided in two different disease entities depending on HPV involvement. We investigated differences in presenting symptoms and clinical findings in patients with HPV-positive and -negative OPSCC tumors. Methods: Altogether 118 consecutive patients diagnosed with primary OPSCC between 2012 and 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital were included. HPV-status of the tumors was assessed by PCR detection of HPV DNA and immunostaining with p16-INK4a antibody. Results: Fifty-one (47.7%) of the patients had HPV-positive and 56 (52.3%) HPV-negative tumors. Forty-nine (49/51, 96.1%) of the HPV+ tumors were also p16+ showing high concordance. The most common presenting symptom among HPV+/p16+ patients was a neck mass (53.1%), whereas any sort of pain in the head and neck area was more frequently related to the HPV-/p16- (60.0%) group. HPV+/p16+ tumors had a tendency to locate in the tonsillar complex and more likely had already spread into regional lymph nodes compared with HPV-/p16- tumors. Smoking and heavy alcohol consumption were significantly more common among HPV-/p16- patients but also rather common among HPV+/p16+ patients. Conclusions: This analysis of symptoms and signs confirm that OPSCC can be dichotomized in two distinct disease entities as defined by HPV status.
  • Mohamed, Hesham; Hagström, Jaana; Jouhi, Lauri; Atula, Timo; Almangush, Alhadi; Mäkitie, Antti; Haglund, Caj (2019)
    Human papillomavirus is detected in over 50% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas. Human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas differ from human papillomavirus-negative tumors, and both expression patterns are classified as distinct entities. The Bmi-1 oncogene is a well-known member of the mammalian polycomb-group family. HESC5:3 and HES77 are newly developed monoclonal antibodies produced against undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. Our aim was to explore their roles in both human papillomavirus-positive and -negative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas. Our cohort comprised 202 consecutive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients diagnosed and treated with curative intent. We used tissue microarray tumor blocks to study the immunohistochemical expression of Bmi-1, HESC5:3, and HES77. We compared the expressions of these stem cell markers with p16 immunoexpression and human papillomavirus status, as well as with other characteristics of the tumor, and with patients' clinical data and follow-up data. Human papillomavirus- and p16-positive tumors expressed less Bmi-1 and more HESC5:3 than the negative tumors. HES77 expression was high in human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, but it did not correlate with p16 positivity. In our multivariable model, Bmi-1 and HESC5:3 were still associated with human papillomavirus, but the association between human papillomavirus and HES77 remained absent. In conclusion, Bmi-1, HESC5:3, and HES77 may have a different role in human papillomavirus-positive and human papillomavirus-negative tumors. There was no correlation between Bmi-1, HESC5:3, and HES77 expression and survival.