Browsing by Subject "parks"

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  • Lyytimäki, Jari (Routledge, 2017)
    Routledge Handbook of Urban Forestry
    Ecosystem services provided by urban green areas have been recognised to an increasing degree following the turn of the millennium (MEA, 2003; Gómez-Baggethun and Barton, 2013). Urban trees in particular provide urban dwellers with a variety of ecosystem services (see Chapter 4 of this volume). However, urban trees are also the source of various types of harm, nuisance and costs. These ‘bad’ aspects may be labelled as ecosystem disservices. The concept of ecosystem disservice is a recent one and there is no widely agreed definition for it. On a general level, ecosystem disservices can be defined as the functions, processes and attributes generated by the ecosystem that result in perceived or actual negative impacts on human wellbeing (Shackleton et al., 2016). Both ecosystem services and disservices are inherently anthropogenic concepts, putting emphasis on the human valuation of ecosystem properties and functions. What is perceived as beautiful and beneficial by one person may be considered ugly, useless, unpleasant or unsafe by another. For example, biodiversity-rich, semi-natural areas inside city limits are often experienced as suffering from a lack of maintenance, as opposed to intensively maintained but biodiversity-poor urban parks.
  • Allen, John A.; Setälä, Heikki; Kotze, David Johan (2020)
    Urban residents and their pets utilize urban greenspaces daily. As urban dog ownership rates increase globally, urban greenspaces are under mounting pressure even as the benefits and services they provide become more important. The urine of dogs is high in nitrogen (N) and may represent a significant portion of the annual urban N load. We examined the spatial distribution and impact of N deposition from dog urine on soils in three urban greenspace typologies in Finland: Parks, Tree Alleys, and Remnant Forests. We analyzed soil from around trees, lampposts and lawn areas near walking paths, and compared these to soils from lawn areas 8 m away from pathways. Soil nitrate, ammonium, total N concentrations, and electrical conductivity were significantly higher and soil pH significantly lower near path-side trees and poles relative to the 8 m lawn plots. Also, stable isotope analysis indicates that the primary source of path-side N are distinct from those of the 8 m lawn plots, supporting our hypothesis that dogs are a significant source of N in urban greenspaces, but that this deposition occurs in a restricted zone associated with walking paths. Additionally, we found that Remnant Forests were the least impacted of the three typologies analyzed. We recommend that landscape planners acknowledge this impact, and design parks to reduce or isolate this source of N from the wider environment.
  • Sormunen, Jani Jukka; Kulha, Niko; Klemola, Tero; Makela, Satu; Vesilahti, Ella-Maria; Vesterinen, Eero Juhani (2020)
    Most tick-related studies in Europe have been conducted in nonurban areas, but ticks and tick-borne pathogens also occur in urban green spaces. From a public health perspective, risks regarding tick-borne infections should be studied in these urban areas, where contacts between infected ticks and humans may be more frequent than elsewhere, due to high human activity. We examined the risk of encountering an infected tick in urban green spaces in Helsinki, Finland. We collected ticks at nine sites throughout Helsinki, recorded the prevalence of several pathogens and identified areas with a high potential for contacts between infected ticks and humans. Moreover, we explored the relationship between the density ofBorrelia burgdorferisensu lato-infected ticks and locally diagnosed cases of borreliosis and compared the potential for human-tick encounters in Helsinki to those in nonurban areas in south-western Finland. During 34.8 km of cloth dragging, 2,417Ixodes ricinuswere caught (402 adults, 1,399 nymphs and 616 larvae). From analysed nymphs, we found 11 distinct tick-borne pathogens, with 31.5% of nymphs carrying at least one pathogen. Tick activity was highest in August and September, leading to the density of nymphs infected withB. burgdorferis.l., and concurrently infection risk, to also be highest during this time. Nymph densities varied between the sampling sites, with obvious implications to spatial variation in infection risk. While ticks and tick-borne pathogens were found in both Helsinki and nonurban areas in south-western Finland, the estimates of human activity were generally higher in urban green spaces, leading to a higher potential for human-tick contacts therein. The presence of ticks and tick-borne pathogens and high local human activity in urban green spaces suggest that they form potential foci regarding the acquisition of tick-borne infections. Risk areas within cities should be identified and knowledge regarding urban ticks increased.
  • Lönnqvist, Bo (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1987)