Browsing by Subject "perinatal asphyxia"

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  • Ala-Kurikka, Tommi; Pospelov, Alexey; Summanen, Milla; Alafuzoff, Aleksander; Kurki, Samu; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai (2021)
    Objective Birth asphyxia (BA) is often associated with seizures that may exacerbate the ensuing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In rodent models of BA, exposure to hypoxia is used to evoke seizures, that commence already during the insult. This is in stark contrast to clinical BA, in which seizures are typically seen upon recovery. Here, we introduce a term-equivalent rat model of BA, in which seizures are triggered after exposure to asphyxia. Methods Postnatal day 11-12 male rat pups were exposed to steady asphyxia (15 min; air containing 5% O-2 + 20% CO2) or to intermittent asphyxia (30 min; three 5 + 5-min cycles of 9% and 5% O-2 at 20% CO2). Cortical activity and electrographic seizures were recorded in freely behaving animals. Simultaneous electrode measurements of intracortical pH, Po-2, and local field potentials (LFPs) were made under urethane anesthesia. Results Both protocols decreased blood pH to Significance The rate of brain pH recovery has a strong influence on post-asphyxia seizure propensity. The recurring hypoxic episodes during intermittent asphyxia promote neuronal excitability, which leads to seizures only after the suppressing effect of the hypercapnic acidosis is relieved. The present rodent model of BA is to our best knowledge the first one in which, consistent with clinical BA, behavioral and electrographic seizures are triggered after and not during the BA-mimicking insult.
  • ALBINO Study Group; Maiwald, C.A.; Annink, K.V.; Rüdiger, M.; Benders, M.J.N.L.; Van Bel, F.; Allegaert, K.; Naulaers, G.; Bassler, D.; Klebermaß-Schrehof, K.; Vento, M.; Guimarães, H.; Stiris, T.; Cattarossi, L.; Metsäranta, M.; Vanhatalo, S.; Mazela, J.; Metsvaht, T.; Jacobs, Y. (2019)
    Background: Perinatal asphyxia and resulting hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a major cause of death and long-term disability in term born neonates. Up to 20,000 infants each year are affected by HIE in Europe and even more in regions with lower level of perinatal care. The only established therapy to improve outcome in these infants is therapeutic hypothermia. Allopurinol is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor that reduces the production of oxygen radicals as superoxide, which contributes to secondary energy failure and apoptosis in neurons and glial cells after reperfusion of hypoxic brain tissue and may further improve outcome if administered in addition to therapeutic hypothermia. Methods: This study on the effects of ALlopurinol in addition to hypothermia treatment for hypoxic-ischemic Brain Injury on Neurocognitive Outcome (ALBINO), is a European double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled parallel group multicenter trial (Phase III) to evaluate the effect of postnatal allopurinol administered in addition to standard of care (including therapeutic hypothermia if indicated) on the incidence of death and severe neurodevelopmental impairment at 24 months of age in newborns with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult and signs of potentially evolving encephalopathy. Allopurinol or placebo will be given in addition to therapeutic hypothermia (where indicated) to infants with a gestational age ≥ 36 weeks and a birth weight ≥ 2500 g, with severe perinatal asphyxia and potentially evolving encephalopathy. The primary endpoint of this study will be death or severe neurodevelopmental impairment versus survival without severe neurodevelopmental impairment at the age of two years. Effects on brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral ultrasound, electric brain activity, concentrations of peroxidation products and S100B, will also be studied along with effects on heart function and pharmacokinetics of allopurinol after iv-infusion. Discussion: This trial will provide data to assess the efficacy and safety of early postnatal allopurinol in term infants with evolving hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. If proven efficacious and safe, allopurinol could become part of a neuroprotective pharmacological treatment strategy in addition to therapeutic hypothermia in children with perinatal asphyxia. Trial registration: NCT03162653, www.ClinicalTrials.gov, May 22, 2017. © 2019 The Author(s).
  • Pospelov, Alexey S.; Puskarjov, Martin; Kaila, Kai; Voipio, Juha (2020)
    Abstract Aim To study brain-sparing physiological responses in a rodent model of birth asphyxia which reproduces the asphyxia-defining systemic hypoxia and hypercapnia. Methods Steady or intermittent asphyxia was induced for 15-45 min in anesthetized 6- and 11-days old rats and neonatal guinea pigs using gases containing 5% or 9% O2 plus 20% CO2 (in N2). Hypoxia and hypercapnia were induced with low O2 and high CO2, respectively. Oxygen partial pressure (PO2) and pH were measured with microsensors within the brain and subcutaneous (?body?) tissue. Blood lactate was measured after asphyxia. Results Brain and body PO2 fell to apparent zero with little recovery during 5% O2 asphyxia and 5% or 9% O2 hypoxia, and increased more than twofold during 20% CO2 hypercapnia. Unlike body PO2, brain PO2 recovered rapidly to control after a transient fall (rat), or was slightly higher than control (guinea pig) during 9% O2 asphyxia. Asphyxia (5% O2) induced a respiratory acidosis paralleled by a progressive metabolic (lact)acidosis that was much smaller within than outside the brain. Hypoxia (5% O2) produced a brain-confined alkalosis. Hypercapnia outlasting asphyxia suppressed pH recovery and prolonged the post-asphyxia PO2 overshoot. All pH changes were accompanied by consistent shifts in the blood-brain barrier potential. Conclusion Regardless of brain maturation stage, hypercapnia can restore brain PO2 and protect the brain against metabolic acidosis despite compromised oxygen availability during asphyxia. This effect extends to the recovery phase if normocapnia is restored slowly, and it is absent during hypoxia, demonstrating that exposure to hypoxia does not mimic asphyxia.
  • Kivi, Anna; Metsäranta, Marjo; Toiviainen-Salo, Sanna; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Haataja, Leena (2022)
    Aim To characterise the spectrum of findings in sequential neurological examinations, general movements (GM) assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of infants with perinatal asphyxia. Methods The prospective cohort study of term infants with perinatal asphyxia treated at Helsinki University Hospital's neonatal units in 2016-2020 used Hammersmith Neonatal Neurological Examination (HNNE) and brain MRI at 2 weeks and Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination (HINE) and GM assessment at 3 months of age. Results Analysis included 50 infants: 33 displaying perinatal asphyxia without hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE), seven with HIE1 and 10 with HIE2. Of the infants with atypical HNNE findings, 24/25 perinatal asphyxia without HIE cases, 5/6 HIE1 cases and all 10 HIE2 cases showed atypical findings in the HINE. The HINE identified atypical spontaneous movements significantly more often in infants with white matter T2 hyperintensity. Conclusion In this cohort, most infants with perinatal asphyxia, with or without HIE, presented atypical neurological findings in sequential examinations. The profile of neurological findings for children with perinatal asphyxia without HIE resembled that of children with HIE. White matter T2 hyperintensity was associated with atypical spontaneous movements in the HINE and was a frequent MRI finding also in perinatal asphyxia without HIE.