Browsing by Subject "polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons"

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  • Kuprijanov, Ivan; Väli, Germo; Sharov, Andrey; Berezina, Nadezhda; Liblik, Taav; Lips, Urmas; Kolesova, Natalja; Mannio, Jaakko; Lips, Inga; Junttila, Ville (Macmillan, 2021)
    Marine Pollution Bulletin, 170 (2021), 112642
    Contamination by hazardous substances is one of the main environmental problems in the eastern Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. A trilateral effort to sample and analyse heavy metals (HMs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and organotins from bottom sediments in 2019–2020 were conducted along with harvesting historical data in Russian, Estonian and Finnish waters. We suggest that the input of organotins still occurs along the ship traffic routes. The tributyltin content exceeded the established quality criteria up to more than 300 times. High contamination by PAHs found near the ports, most likely originate from incomplete fuel incineration processes. The Neva River Estuary and Luga Bay might potentially suffer from severe cadmium contamination. The high ecological risk attributed to the HMs was detected at deep offshore areas. The simulated accumulation pattern qualitatively agrees with field observations of HMs in sediments, demonstrating the potential of numerical tools to tackle the hazardous substances problems.
  • Kohl, Lukas; Meng, Meng; de Vera, Joan; Bergquist, Bridget; Cooke, Colin A.; Hustings, Sarah; Jackson, Brian; Chow, Chung-Wai; Chan, Arthur W. H. (2019)
    Wildfires are increasing in prevalence and intensity and emit large quantities of persistent organic and inorganic pollutants. Recent fires have caused elevated concerns that residual pollutants in indoor environments pose a long‐term health hazard to residents, however, to date no studies have investigated how long fire‐derived pollutants are retained in indoor environments. We quantified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and toxic trace elements in ground ashes from the 2016 wildland‐urban interface fires in Fort McMurray (Alberta, Canada) and in house dust from 64 homes. We document residual arsenic pollution from local building fires, but found no evidence that forest fire ash remained in households 14 months after the fire. Overall, house dust pollutant concentrations were equal or lower than in other locations unaffected by wildfires. Given the current and future concerns over wildfire impacts, this study provides importance evidence on the degree of their long‐term effects on the residential environment.
  • Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Viluksela, Matti (2020)
    Dioxins and related compounds are common environmental contaminants. Although their levels have gone down, they are still of concern, in particular regarding developmental toxicity. The adverse effects of these compounds are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), whose canonical signaling pathway has been unveiled in fair detail. The alternative (non-genomic) pathways are much more obscure. AHR has also proven to be a master regulator of numerous physiological phenomena, which has led to the search of selective AHR modulators with low toxicity. Papers of this Special Issue address the developmental toxicity of dioxins and related compounds as well as selective modulators of AHR and both its canonical and alternative signaling pathways. In addition, new optical and stereoscopic methods for the detection of dioxins are presented. As a whole, this Special Issue provides an up-to-date view on a wide variety of aspects related to dioxin toxicity mechanisms from both original research articles and reviews.
  • Gelman, Valeria (Helsingfors universitet, 2014)
    The increased rates of population growth and urbanization worldwide raises the question of food security and self-reliance in cities. In view of this situation, in recent years there has been a re-emergence of urban agriculture in its traditional form and in new variations, such as on urban rooftops. A number of rooftop urban farms exist in the world; however, very few studies have been done to establish the quality of crops they produce, specifically concerning the concentrations of contaminants. The main purpose of this study was to investigate levels of contamination in edible plants grown on urban rooftops. I determined concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and trace metals in the biomass of three types of horticultural crops grown in the city of Helsinki, Finland. Lettuce, radish and peas were planted on five rooftops in various areas of Helsinki and control samples were acquired from local food stores and markets. Both groups of crops were analyzed for concentrations of 11 trace elements using the Elan 6000 ICP-MS and 16 PAHs using Shimadzu GC-MS-QP2010 Ultra system with the AOC-20i /AOC-20s autosampler. Additionally, lettuce and pea samples from the roofs were analyzed washed and unwashed to establish levels of particulate contamination on the surface of plants that can be mechanically removed through washing. Results obtained suggest that concentrations of PAHs and trace metals in rooftop vegetables in Helsinki are very low and the differences in their concentrations compared to control (store) samples are insignificant. This demonstrates that the consumption of vegetables produced in uncontaminated soil on urban roofs in Helsinki is safe. All samples showed concentrations well below the safety limits for heavy metals and PAHs established in the European Union (EC, 2006). Finally, there was a difference in concentration of PAHs and trace metals between washed and unwashed samples, however most of the results did not show statistical significance.