Browsing by Subject "prolamin"

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  • Luoto, Sanna (Helsingfors universitet, 2011)
    The literature review dealt with celiac-toxic Triticeae prolamins and their enzymatic degradation. Also the immunochemical methods for prolamin analysis were introduced. The gluten-derived immunogenic peptides are proline-rich and thereby remarkably resistant to proteolytic degradation. Most of the triggering prolamins can, however, be degraded by combining endogenous cereal enzyme activity with acidic incubation. Despite of this residual prolamins still exist and their concentration exceeds the threshold considered to be safe for gluten intolerants. The objective of the experimental work was to further hydrolyse the residual prolamins present in malt autolysates of wheat, barley and rye, with a food grade proline endopeptidase from Aspergillus niger (AN-PEP). Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), free amino nitrogen (FAN) and SDS-PAGE analysis determined the extent of protein hydrolysis. Actual prolamin degradation was observed with immunological methods. Hydrolysis of residual prolamins was extensive in all malt systems – more than 96% of the prolamins were hydrolysed. The SEC and FAN data revealed that continuation of the hydrolysis overnight converted the polypeptides into smaller hydrolysis products. According to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses, 22 h incubation decreased the prolamin contents of wheat and rye malt hydrolysates below the level of 100 mg/kg. This level was achieved with AN-PEP concentration of 35 ?L/g in relation to freeze-dried autolysate. According to the Codex Alimentarius, food products containing gluten up to 100 mg/kg can be labelled 'very low gluten' and thus included in coeliac diet. AN-PEP treated rye malt ingredient could especially be a promising low-gluten ingredient to enhance the flavour of often poor-quality gluten-free bread. Before commercial applications can be devised the potential as a flavouring agent as well as the clinical safety of the product must be evaluated.
  • Ahola, Hanna Gabriela; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula; Schulman, Alan; Tanhuanpää, Pirjo; Viitala, Sirja; Huang, Xin (2020)
    Oats have been found to be tolerated by most celiac disease patients, and oats are generally considered a good and safe addition to the gluten-free diet. There have been claims that some individual oat cultivars are harmful or immunogenic for celiac disease patients. In this study, we investigated 26 oat cultivars and landraces from the current breeding market and literature. Their total protein content ranged from 15.3% to 23.1% of which avenins ranged from 6.8% to 10.9%. Immunological activities of avenins were evaluated using mmunochemical analyses using monoclonal antibodies (mAb) R5 and G12. No immunological activity of the oat cultivars was observed by mAb R5 either in immunoblotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). mAB G12 showed no activity in immunoblotting, but gave responses between 13 and 53 mg/kg in ELISA for total avenin extract. To understand the varying G12 activity, avenins were further fractionated. One avenin fraction showed a higher G12 response than the other fractions. Protein sequence comparison suggests that there is no direct binding to avenin-specific T-cell epitopes but the differences in repetitive regions in avenins may contribute to varying results in G12 ELISA.
  • Perkiö, Pasi (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    The aim of the literature review was to examine barley’s (Hordeum vulgare) alcohol-soluble proteins – hordeins and their technological attributes. Additionally, applicability of flow field flow fractionation (FFF) separation method as well as spectrophotometric and light scattering methods for protein characterization was under investigation. The objective of the experimental research was to determine a suitable extraction method for hordeins and subsequent analysis of their molecular weight distribution, size and conformation by the use of AF4 (asymmetric flow field flow fractionation) in combination with MALS-, UV- and RI-detectors. 40 % 1 propanol combined with mild sonication treatment proved to be the most efficient method to extract hordeins from barley flour. In order to prevent deterioration of the FFF channels the solvent had to be diluted to 20 %. Same dilution was used to measure hordeins’ extinction coefficient and to calculate ?n/?c theoretically. Berry plot was found to be the most suitable fit for the data analysis. Extracted hordeins were analysed with SDS PAGE. Extracts contained monomeric C, B and ? hordeins and polymeric B, D and ? hordeins. Also, small amounts of albumins, globulins and hydrolysed proteins were present. Extracts’ fractograms had five distinctive peaks. All of the peaks’ mass fractals and polydispersity indices were above 1, which means analysed aggregates were polydisperse and shaped as complex rods. This can be explained by 1 propanol influenced protein aggregation. Some inference in light scattering was identified in the MALS detector signal. This and the use of measured extinction coefficient and calculated index of refraction caused some errors in the data. The low sample yield (19–26 %) can be explained by the hordeins’ adhering to a syringe filter and adsorbing to the surface of AF4’s ultrafiltration membrane. Also, the use of over simplifying mathematical model to calculate the results and yield could cause some errors in the results. This study showed that it is possible to study Mw, size and conformation of polymeric hordeins with AF4 combined with MALS/UV-detectors and that hordeins form big aggregates in 20 % 1 propanol. For MALS proteins should be extracted in a solvent that will not interfere with subsequent analysis and proteins net charge, which creates a challenge to find proper solvent for hordeins. Nevertheless AF4 proved to be useful and delicate tool for characterizing cereal polymeric proteins.
  • Rahikainen, Antti (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    The aim of the literature review was to research barley proteins, metal-catalyzed oxidation and subjects related to it, like antioxidants and oxidation reactions in beer. In addition ACE inhibition was looked into. The object of the experimental part was to find out if the proteins of a barley-based industrial side product can be modified by metal-catalyzed oxidation or enzymatic hydrolysis, and how these treatments affect the different proteins in the sample material. In addition, the possible ACE inhibition activity of the reaction products was determined. The sample material was a protein-rich side-product of barley starch production. Two protein fractions were extracted from the material; an alcohol soluble fraction and a reduced fraction. The modification of the proteins in the sample fractions by oxidation and hydrolysis was determined with gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography. The ACE inhibitory activity of the small peptides from these reactions was determined with UV-VIS spectroscopy. Three protein groups were identified from the sample material; polymeric B hordein, monomeric B hordein and C hordein. Contrary to expectations metal-catalyzed oxidation did not break down any of the proteins in the sample; instead it aggregated the proteins into bigger units. The enzyme treatment hydrolyzed the proteins effectively. Small peptides from the enzyme hydrolysis had an ACE inhibition IC50 of 246 µg/ml, which is similar to gluten hydrolysates IC50 of 29 µg/ml. IC50 is the inhibitor concentration where 50% of enzyme activity is inhibited. Instead of breaking down the subject proteins metal-catalyzed oxidation aggregated them, and thus it could not be used to make ACE inhibitory peptides. Enzyme hydrolysis was found to be a valid method of inhibitor peptide production. The peptides produced had an ACE inhibition capacity similar to previously known ACE inhibitory food hydrolysates.
  • Huang, Xin; Kanerva, Paivi; Salovaara, Hannu; Stoddard, Frederick L.; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula (2017)
    The concentration of residual barley prolamin (hordein) in gluten-free products is overestimated by the R5 ELISA method when calibrated against the wheat gliadin standard. The reason for this may be that the composition of the gliadin standard is different from the composition of hordeins. This study showed that the recognition of whole hordein by R5 antibody mainly came from C-hordein, which is more reactive than the other hordeins. The proportion of C-hordein in total hordein ranged from 16 to 33% of common Finnish barley cultivars used in this study and was always higher than that of omega-gliadin, the homologous protein class in the gliadin standard, which may account for the overestimation. Thus, a hordein standard is needed for barley prolamin quantification instead of the gliadin standard. When gluten-free oat flour was spiked with barley flour, the prolamin concentration was overestimated 1.8-2.5 times with the gliadin standard, whereas estimates in the correct range were obtained when the standard was 40% C-hordein mixed with an inert protein. A preparative-scale method was developed to isolate and purify C-hordein, and C-hordein is proposed as a reference material to calibrate barley prolamin quantification in R5-based assays.