Browsing by Subject "protein secretion"

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  • Nyman, Tuula A.; Lorey, Martina B.; Cypryk, Wojciech; Matikainen, Sampsa (2017)
    Introduction: The immune system is our defense system against microbial infections and tissue injury, and understanding how it works in detail is essential for developing drugs for different diseases. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics can provide in-depth information on the molecular mechanisms involved in immune responses.Areas covered: Summarized are the key immunology findings obtained with MS-based proteomics in the past five years, with a focus on inflammasome activation, global protein secretion, mucosal immunology, immunopeptidome and T cells. Special focus is on extracellular vesicle-mediated protein secretion and its role in immune responses.Expert commentary: Proteomics is an essential part of modern omics-scale immunology research. To date, MS-based proteomics has been used in immunology to study protein expression levels, their subcellular localization, secretion, post-translational modifications, and interactions in immune cells upon activation by different stimuli. These studies have made major contributions to understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in innate and adaptive immune responses. New developments in proteomics offer constantly novel possibilities for exploring the immune system. Examples of these techniques include mass cytometry and different MS-based imaging approaches which can be widely used in immunology.
  • Al-Rashed, F.; Ahmad, Z.; Iskandar, M.A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Al-Mulla, F.; Ahmad, R. (2019)
    Background/Aims: TNF-α-mediated pro-inflammatory phenotypic change in monocytes is known to be implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance. However, the mechanism by which TNF-α-induces inflammatory phenotypic shift in monocytes is poorly understood. Since long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) is associated with inflammatory monocytes/macrophages, we investigated the role of ACSL1 in the TNF-α-driven inflammatory phenotypic shift in the monocytes. Methods: Monocytes (Human monocytic THP-1 cells) were stimulated with TNF-α. Inflammatory phenotypic markers (CD16, CD11b, CD11c and HLA-DR) expression was determined with real time RT-PCR and flow cytometry. IL-1β and MCP-1 were determined by ELISA. Signaling pathways were identified by using ACSL1 inhibitor, ACSL1 siRNA and NF-κB reporter monocytic cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB was analyzed by western blotting and flow cytometry. Results: Our data show that TNF-α induced significant increase in the expression of CD16, CD11b, CD11c and HLA-DR. Inhibition of ACSL1 activity in the cells with triacsin C significantly suppressed the expression of these inflammatory markers. Using ACSL-1 siRNA, we further demonstrate that TNF-α-induced inflammatory markers expression in monocytic cells requires ACSL1. In addition, IL-1b and MCP-1 production by TNF-α activated monocytic cells was significantly blocked by the inhibition of ACSL-1 activity. Interestingly, elevated NF-κB activity resulting from TNF-α stimulation was attenuated in ACSL1 deficient cells. Conclusion: Our findings provide an evidence that TNF-α-associated inflammatory polarization in monocytes is an ACSL1 dependent process, which indicates its central role in TNF-α-driven metabolic inflammation. © 2019 The Author(s).