Browsing by Subject "quartz crystal microbalance"

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  • Dusa, Filip; Chen, Wen; Witos, Joanna; Wiedmer, Susanne Kristina (2019)
    The importance of using biomimicking membranes for various biological applications is rising, as such models are relevant for imitating real organisms. In addition, biomimicking membranes are usually much more repeatable in preparation and easier to handle during analysis than real organisms or biological membranes. In this work, we developed a method for the adsorption of intact small unilamellar Escherichia coli (E. cols) vesicles (Z-average size of 73 nm) on SiO2 substrate material. We describe the adsorption process based on the use of two surface sensitive techniques, i.e., nanoplasmonic sensing (NPS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The acquired data show that the adsorption follows a two-step process. The first step is a slow adsorption of E coil vesicle aggregates held together by 5 mM of calcium (Z-average size of 531 nm). The Z-average of the aggregates decreased almost three times when the calcium concentration was decreased to 0.1 mM. This suggests that the aggregates were disassembling to some extent when calcium was removed from the system. With both techniques, i.e., NPS and QCM, we observed a second rapid adsorption step after the solution was changed to deionized water. In this second step, the aggregates started to fall apart as the calcium concentration dropped, and the released vesicles started to adsorb onto unoccupied spots at the SiO2 surface of the sensors. Extensive release of mass from the surface was confirmed by QCM, where it was reflected by a sharp increase of frequency, while NPS, due to its lower sensing depth of a few tens of nanometers, did not record such a change. Taken together, we have developed a protocol to form a supported vesicle layer (SVL) of E coli vesicles on SiO2 surface using sodium 4-(2-hydroxyethyppiperazine-1-ethanesulfonate buffer, thus enabling the preparation of E coli biomimicking SVLs for interaction studies of compounds of interest. The immobilization happens via a two-step adsorption process.
  • Multia, Evgen (Helsingfors universitet, 2017)
    The literature part of this thesis reviewed the process of obtaining affinity information with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors. Basic principles of these biosensors were also evaluated, along with the principles of data acquisition and finally the data processing. The raw data produced by QCM or SPR can be used to study biomolecular interactions qualitatively and quantitatively. These techniques are also powerful in obtaining kinetic and thermodynamic information of the biomolecular interactions. SPR and QCM can produce data easily, but data interpretation can be sometimes problematic. This is partly due to misconceptions on how the sensograms should be interpreted. Many of the interpretational problems can and should be avoided long before the modeling of the data takes place to obtain reliable affinity data. The literature part of this thesis also presents tools for developing good experimental design. Well-designed experimental set-up is the most important element for producing good biosensor data. One should also estimate from the sensogram shapes what kind of analysis is needed. This was explained in detail in the literature part, pointing out the key elements how sensograms with certain shape should be interpreted and further analyzed to obtain affinity constants. Data analysis part of the literature review provides also information how to use appropriate models (e.g. fitting equilibrium, kinetic or complex data) with extensive examples. Surface site distribution model will be also covered as the tool to analyze complex biomolecular interactions by QCM and SPR. In the experimental part, affinity of anti-human apoB-100 monoclonal antibody (anti-apoB-100 Mab) towards different lipoproteins was studied with partially filling affinity capillary (PF-ACE) electrophoresis and QCM. PF-ACE with adsorption energy distribution (AED) calculations provided information on the heterogeneity of the interactions. For the first time, a modified surface site distribution model called Interaction map was utilized to model QCM data of lipoprotein interactions with anti-apoB-100 Mab. With the Interaction maps, it was possible to distinguish different kinetics of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and anti-apoB-100 Mab interactions. Affinity constants obtained were used to evaluate thermodynamics of these interactions. Both methods were also used to evaluate interactions with other apoB-100 containing lipoproteins: intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) and very lowdensity lipoprotein (VLDL). It was found that the Interaction maps could distinguish two different kinetics from the mixture of IDL-VLDL with distinct affinity constants. Both methods agreed well with the affinity constants. It was found that the anti-apoB-100 Mab used in this study, had a high affinity towards apoB-100 containing lipoproteins. In the second part of the experimental, a convective interaction media (CIM) based LDL isolation platform was developed. In these studies, anti-apoB-100 Mab was immobilized on the CIM-disk and was used to isolate LDL from human plasma and serum samples. It was found that apolipoprotein based separation of LDL from plasma was possible, although not without difficulties, since apoB-100 is not only present in LDL, but also in VLDL and IDL. To circumvent this problem different antibodies (anti-apoE and anti-apoAI) were utilized to capture VLDL and IDL from the plasma before the interaction of LDL with the anti-apoB-100 CIM-disk. LDL was successfully isolated with this approach in a significantly reduced time compared to conventional ultracentrifugation method used for LDL isolation.
  • Parkkila, Petteri; Viitala, Tapani (2020)
    We have utilized multiparametric surface plasmon resonance and impendance-based quartz crystal microbalance instruments to study the distribution coefficients of catechol derivatives in cell model membranes. Our findings verify that the octanol-water partitioning coefficient is a poor descriptor of the total lipid affinity for small molecules which show limited lipophilicity in the octanol-water system. Notably, 3-methoxytyramine, the methylated derivative of the neurotransmitter dopamine, showed substantial affinity to the lipids despite its nonlipophilic nature predicted by octanol-water partitioning. The average ratio of distribution coefficients between 3-methoxytyramine and dopamine was 8.0. We also found that the interactions between the catechols and the membranes modeling the cell membrane outer leaflet are very weak, suggesting a mechanism other than the membrane-mediated mechanism of action for the neurotransmitters at the postsynaptic site. The average distribution coefficient for these membranes was one-third of the average value for pure phosphatidylcholine membranes, calculated using all compounds. In the context of our previous work, we further theorize that membrane-bound enzymes can utilize membrane headgroup partitioning to find their substrates. This could explain the differences in enzyme affinity between soluble and membrane-bound isoforms of catechol-O-methyltransferase, an essential enzyme in catechol metabolism.