Browsing by Subject "recommendations"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-5 of 5
  • Ahola, Aila J.; Saraheimo, Markku; Freese, Riitta; Forsblom, Carol; Mäkimattila, Sari; Groop, Per-Henrik; FinnDiane Study Grp (2017)
    Aims: Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Diet, as a modifiable risk factor, may in turn impact systemic inflammation. We therefore assessed whether adherence to the dietary recommendations is associated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations in type 1 diabetes. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 677 FinnDiane study participants (48% men, mean +/- standard deviation age 46 +/- 13 years) were included. Dietary intake was assessed with a self-administered questionnaire. A diet score, with higher values denoting better adherence to the recommendations, was calculated. Serum hs-CRP concentration was measured, and individuals with hs-CRP <1.0 mg/l, and hs-CRP > 3.0 but <10.0 mg/l were compared. Results: Men and women with high hs-CRP had higher BMI, waist circumference, and triglyceride concentration, but lower HDL-cholesterol concentration. Adjusted for BMI, mean diet score was higher in the low hs-CRP group, both in men (10.8 +/- 3.6 vs. 9.9 +/- 3.8, p = 0.023) and women (12.7 +/- 3.4 vs. 11.6 +/- 3.5, p = 0.021). After further adjustments with potential confounding factors, the difference remained significant only in men. Conclusions: A diet that more closely adheres to the dietary recommendations is associated with lower hs-CRP in men. A prudent diet may help reduce systemic inflammation in type 1 diabetes. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Matschoss, Kaisa Johanna; Repo, Juha Petteri; Schultze, Jürgen; Berchem, Marina; Velasco, Guillermo; Popper, Rafael; Linford, Soizic; Avarello, Alba; Pinto, Marta (Public Participation in Developing a Common Framework for Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation, CASI, 2017)
    This report gives policy recommendations for steering research and innovation towards more sustainable futures and for ways in which public engagement can contribute to that end. It presents key insights from the EU FP7 research project, CASI (“Public participation in Developing a Common Framework for Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation”), responding to one of the Societal Challenges set out in the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Union, namely “Climate action, environment, resource efficiency and raw materials”.
  • Wardlaw, Joanna M; Debette, Stephanie; Jokinen, Hanna; De Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Pantoni, Leonardo; Chabriat, Hugues; Staals, Julie; Doubal, Fergus; Rudilosso, Salvatore; Eppinger, Sebastian; Schilling, Sabrina; Ornello, Raffaele; Enzinger, Christian; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Taylor-Rowan, Martin; Lindgren, Arne G. (2021)
    'Covert' cerebral small vessel disease (ccSVD) is common on neuroimaging in persons without overt neurological manifestations, and increases the risk of future stroke, cognitive impairment, dependency, and death. These European Stroke Organisation (ESO) guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations to assist with clinical decisions about management of ccSVD, specifically white matter hyperintensities and lacunes, to prevent adverse clinical outcomes. The guidelines were developed according to ESO standard operating procedures and Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. We prioritised the clinical outcomes of stroke, cognitive decline or dementia, dependency, death, mobility and mood disorders, and interventions of blood pressure lowering, antiplatelet drugs, lipid lowering, lifestyle modifications, glucose lowering and conventional treatments for dementia. We systematically reviewed the literature, assessed the evidence, formulated evidence-based recommendations where feasible, and expert consensus statements. We found little direct evidence, mostly of low quality. We recommend patients with ccSVD and hypertension to have their blood pressure well controlled; lower blood pressure targets may reduce ccSVD progression. We do not recommend antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin in ccSVD. We found little evidence on lipid lowering in ccSVD. Smoking cessation is a health priority. We recommend regular exercise which may benefit cognition, and a healthy diet, good sleep habits, avoiding obesity and stress for general health reasons. In ccSVD, we found no evidence for glucose control in the absence of diabetes or for conventional Alzheimer dementia treatments. Randomised controlled trials with clinical endpoints are a priority for ccSVD.
  • Dufraing, Kelly; van Krieken, J. Henricus; De Hertogh, Gert; Hoefler, Gerald; Oniscu, Anca; Kuhlmann, Tine P.; Weichert, Wilko; Marchio, Caterina; Ristimaki, Ari; Ryska, Ales; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Dequeker, Elisabeth (2019)
    Aims Results from external quality assessment revealed considerable variation in neoplastic cell percentages (NCP) estimation in samples for biomarker testing. As molecular biology tests require a minimal NCP, overestimations may lead to false negative test results. We aimed to develop recommendations to improve the NCP determination in a prototypical entity - colorectal carcinoma - that can be adapted for other cancer types. Methods and results A modified Delphi study was conducted to reach consensus by 10 pathologists from 10 countries with experience in determining the NCP for colorectal adenocarcinoma. This study included two online surveys and a decision-making meeting. Consensus was defined a priori as an agreement of > 80%. All pathologists completed both surveys. Consensus was reached for 8 out of 19 and 2 out of 13 questions in the first and second surveys, respectively. Remaining issues were resolved during the meeting. Twenty-four recommendations were formulated. Major recommendations resulted as follows: only pathologists should conduct the morphological evaluation; nevertheless molecular biologists/technicians may estimate the NCP, if specific training has been performed and a pathologist is available for feedback. The estimation should be determined in the area with the highest density of viable neoplastic cells and lowest density of inflammatory cells. Other recommendations concerned: the determination protocol itself, needs for micro- and macro-dissection, reporting and interpreting, referral practices and applicability to other cancer types. Conclusion We believe these recommendations may lead to more accurate NCP estimates, ensuring the correct interpretation of test results, and might help in validating digital algorithms in the future.
  • Pilz, Stefan; Maerz, Winfried; Cashman, Kevin D.; Kiely, Mairead E.; Whiting, Susan J.; Holick, Michael F.; Grant, William B.; Pludowski, Pawel; Hiligsmann, Mickael; Trummer, Christian; Schwetz, Verena; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Pandis, Marlene; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Gruebler, Martin R.; Gaksch, Martin; Verheyen, Nicolas; Hollis, Bruce W.; Rejnmark, Lars; Karras, Spyridon N.; Hahn, Andreas; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A.; Reichrath, Jörg; Jorde, Rolf; Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Vieth, Reinhold; Scragg, Robert; Calvo, Mona S.; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Bouillon, Roger; Lips, Paul; Itkonen, Suvi T.; Martineau, Adrian R.; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel; Zittermann, Armin (2018)
    Vitamin D deficiency can lead to musculoskeletal diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia, but vitamin D supplementation may also prevent extraskeletal diseases such as respiratory tract infections, asthma exacerbations, pregnancy complications and premature deaths. Vitamin D has a unique metabolism as it is mainly obtained through synthesis in the skin under the influence of sunlight (i.e., ultraviolet-B radiation) whereas intake by nutrition traditionally plays a relatively minor role. Dietary guidelines for vitamin D are based on a consensus that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations are used to assess vitamin D status, with the recommended target concentrations ranging from >= 25 to >= 50 nmol/L (>= 10->= 20 ng/mL), corresponding to a daily vitamin D intake of 10 to 20 mu g (400-800 international units). Most populations fail to meet these recommended dietary vitamin D requirements. In Europe, 25(OH)D concentrations <30 nmol/L (12 ng/mL) and <50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL) are present in 13.0 and 40.4% of the general population, respectively. This substantial gap between officially recommended dietary reference intakes for vitamin D and the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the general population requires action from health authorities. Promotion of a healthier lifestyle with more outdoor activities and optimal nutrition are definitely warranted but will not erase vitamin D deficiency and must, in the case of sunlight exposure, be well balanced with regard to potential adverse effects such as skin cancer. Intake of vitamin D supplements is limited by relatively poor adherence (in particular in individuals with low-socioeconomic status) and potential for overdosing. Systematic vitamin D food fortification is, however, an effective approach to improve vitamin D status in the general population, and this has already been introduced by countries such as the US, Canada, India, and Finland. Recent advances in our knowledge on the safety of vitamin D treatment, the dose-response relationship of vitamin D intake and 25(OH)D levels, as well as data on the effectiveness of vitamin D fortification in countries such as Finland provide a solid basis to introduce and modify vitamin D food fortification in order to improve public health with this likewise cost-effective approach.