Browsing by Subject "response"

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  • Carter, Timothy R.; Benzie, Magnus; Campiglio, Emanuele; Carlsen, Henrik; Fronzek, Stefan; Hildén, Mikael; Reyer, Christopher P.O.; West, Chris (Elsevier, 2021)
    Global Environmental Change 69: 102307
    Climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability studies tend to confine their attention to impacts and responses within the same geographical region. However, this approach ignores cross-border climate change impacts that occur remotely from the location of their initial impact and that may severely disrupt societies and livelihoods. We propose a conceptual framework and accompanying nomenclature for describing and analysing such cross-border impacts. The conceptual framework distinguishes an initial impact that is caused by a climate trigger within a specific region. Downstream consequences of that impact propagate through an impact transmission system while adaptation responses to deal with the impact propagate through a response transmission system. A key to understanding cross-border impacts and responses is a recognition of different types of climate triggers, categories of cross-border impacts, the scales and dynamics of impact transmission, the targets and dynamics of responses and the socio-economic and environmental context that also encompasses factors and processes unrelated to climate change. These insights can then provide a basis for identifying relevant causal relationships. We apply the framework to the floods that affected industrial production in Thailand in 2011, and to projected Arctic sea ice decline, and demonstrate that the framework can usefully capture the complex system dynamics of cross-border climate impacts. It also provides a useful mechanism to identify and understand adaptation strategies and their potential consequences in the wider context of resilience planning. The cross-border dimensions of climate impacts could become increasingly important as climate changes intensify. We conclude that our framework will allow for these to be properly accounted for, help to identify new areas of empirical and model-based research and thereby support climate risk management.
  • Johansson, Karin S. L.; El-Soda, Mohamed; Pagel, Ellen; Meyer, Rhonda C.; Toldsepp, Kadri; Nilsson, Anders K.; Brosche, Mikael; Kollist, Hannes; Uddling, Johan; Andersson, Mats X. (2020)
    Background and Aims The stomatal conductance (g(s)) of most plant species decreases in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration. This response could have a significant impact on plant water use in a future climate. However, the regulation of the CO2 induced stomatal closure response is not fully understood. Moreover, the potential genetic links between short-term (within minutes to hours) and long-term (within weeks to months) responses of g(s) to increased atmospheric CO2 have not been explored. Methods We used Arabidopsis thaliana recombinant inbred lines originating from accessions Col-0 (strong CO2 response) and C24 (weak CO2 response) to study short- and long-term controls of g(s) Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was used to identify loci controlling short- and long-term g(s) responses to elevated CO2 as well as other stomata-related traits. Key Results Short- and long-term stomatal responses to elevated CO2 were significantly correlated. Both short-and long-term responses were associated with a QTL, at the end of chromosome 2. The location of this QTL was confirmed using near-isogonic lines and it was fine-mapped to a 410-kb region. The QTL did not correspond to any known gene involved in stomatal closure and had no effect on the responsiveness to abscisic acid. Additionally, we identified numerous other loci associated with stomatal regulation. Conclusions We identified and confirmed the effect of a strong QTL corresponding to a yet unknown regulator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2 concentration. The correlation between short- and long-term stomatal CO2 responses and the genetic link between these traits highlight the importance of understanding guard cell CO2 signalling to predict and manipulate plant water use in a world with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. This study demonstrates the power of using natural variation to unravel the genetic regulation of complex traits.
  • Pang, Yuwen; Huang, Yuxin; He, Li; Zhou, Yinying; Sui, Jun; Xu, Junfeng (2021)
    Boreal peatlands, of which Sphagnum bogs are one of the main types, play essential roles in the terrestrial soil carbon pool. Vegetation phenology is a sensitive indicator that reveals the underlying processes as well as responses to climate change, while currently there remain knowledge gaps in exploring and monitoring the longterm bog vegetation phenology due to insufficient remote sensing application experiences. In this study, we investigated three remotely sensed vegetation phenological parameters, the start of growing season (SOS), the end of growing season (EOS), and the length of growing season (LOS) in two bogs located in norther China by using double-logistic reconstructed MOD13Q1-EVI from 2001 to 2018, which were evaluated by the flux phenology. Also combing with meteorological data to detect interactions between vegetation phenology and climate change. The results showed that remotely sensed EOS had 8-day time lags with flux phenological date, while that outperformed SOS. Bog vegetation generally with a life pattern of SOS at the 108th day of year (doy) and EOS at the 328th doy, though the life cycle of individual vegetation groups varies among different vegetation communities. There was no significant delayed (or extended) trend in each phenological features in bogs. Precipitation and minimum temperature (monthly and annual) were the driving forces for bog vegetation growth (R2 0.9, P < 0.01), and other features presented weaker correlations. Overall, this study determined the remote sensing phenology and climate drivers in two Chinese bogs, we suggested that vegetation phenology alternation should be concerned when carry on ecological processes and carbon dynamics researches in peatlands.
  • Sarremejane, Romain; Truchy, Amélie; McKie, Brendan G.; Mykrä, Heikki; Johnson, Richard K.; Huusko, Ari; Sponseller, Ryan A.; Muotka, Timo (John Wiley & Sons, 2021)
    Journal of Animal Ecology 90 (4), 886-898
    1. Community responses to and recovery from disturbances depend on local (e.g. presence of refuges) and regional (connectivity to recolonization sources) factors. Droughts are becoming more frequent in boreal regions, and are likely to constitute a severe disturbance for boreal stream communities where organisms largely lack adaptations to such hydrological extremes. 2. We conducted an experiment in 24 semi-natural stream flumes to assess the effects of local and regional factors on the responses of benthic invertebrate communities to a short-term drought. We manipulated flow (drought vs. constant-flow), spatial arrangement of leaf litter patches (aggregated vs. evenly distributed) and colonization from regional species pool (enhanced vs. ambient connectivity) to test the combined effects of disturbance, resource arrangement and connectivity on the structural and functional responses of benthic invertebrate communities. 3. We found that a drought as short as 1 week reduced invertebrate taxonomic richness and abundance, mainly through stochastic extinctions. Such changes in richness were not reflected in functional diversity. This suggests that communities were characterized by a high degree of functional redundancy, which allowed maintenance of functional diversity despite species losses. Feeding groups responded differently to drought, with organic matter decomposers responding more than scrapers and predators. 4. Three weeks were insufficient for complete invertebrate community recovery from drought. However, recovery was greater in channels subjected to enhanced connectivity, which increased taxonomic diversity and abundance of certain taxa. Spatial configuration of resources explained the least variation in our response variables, having a significant effect only on invertebrate abundance and evenness (both sampling occasions) and taxonomic richness (end of recovery period). 5. Even a short drought, if occurring late in the season, may not allow communities to recover before the onset of winter, thus having a potentially long-lasting effect on stream communities. For boreal headwaters, extreme dewatering poses a novel disturbance regime that may trigger substantial and potentially irreversible changes. An improved understanding of such changes is needed to underpin adaptive management strategies in these increasingly fragmented and disturbed ecosystems.