Browsing by Subject "saasteet"

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  • Hashemi, Fatemeh; Pohle, Ina; Pullens, Johannes W. M; Tornbjerg, Henrik; Kyllmar, Katarina; Marttila, Hannu; Lepistö, Ahti; Klove, Bjorn; Futter, Martyn; Kronvang, Brian (MDPI, 2020)
    Water 12 6 (2020)
    Optimal nutrient pollution monitoring and management in catchments requires an in-depth understanding of spatial and temporal factors controlling nutrient dynamics. Such an understanding can potentially be obtained by analysing stream concentration–discharge (C-Q) relationships for hysteresis behaviours and export regimes. Here, a classification scheme including nine different C-Q types was applied to a total of 87 Nordic streams draining mini-catchments (0.1–65 km2). The classification applied is based on a combination of stream export behaviour (dilution, constant, enrichment) and hysteresis rotational pattern (clock-wise, no rotation, anti-clockwise). The scheme has been applied to an 8-year data series (2010–2017) from small streams in Denmark, Sweden, and Finland on daily discharge and discrete nutrient concentrations, including nitrate (NO3−), total organic N (TON), dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP), and particulate phosphorus (PP). The dominant nutrient export regimes were enrichment for NO3− and constant for TON, DRP, and PP. Nutrient hysteresis patterns were primarily clockwise or no hysteresis. Similarities in types of C-Q relationships were investigated using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) considering effects of catchment size, land use, climate, and dominant soil type. The PCA analysis revealed that land use and air temperature were the dominant factors controlling nutrient C-Q types. Therefore, the nutrient export behaviour in streams draining Nordic mini-catchments seems to be dominantly controlled by their land use characteristics and, to a lesser extent, their climate.
  • Albrecht, Horst; Carman, Rolf; Jensen, Arne; Jonsson, Per; Kankaanpää, Harri; Larsen, Birger; Leivuori, Mirja; Niemistö, Lauri; Uscinowicz, Szymon; Winterhalter, Boris (Merentutkimuslaitos, 2003)
    Meri 50
  • Lyytimäki, Jari; Assmuth, Timo (Springer Nature, 2015)
    GeoJournal 80, 113–127 (2015)
    Securing high-quality potable water is a key challenge for all societies. The question is not only about water availability and quality determined by hydrological, chemical, and biological factors, or technologies and monetary assets, but also about various cultural, social, and political factors that together constitute so-called hydro-social cycles. We focus on risk communication and management, in connection with the debates on planning and construction of an artificial groundwater recharge system in the Virttaankangas esker, aiming to provide potable water for the region of Turku, southwest Finland. Based on print media coverage, online debate, and comments on the environmental impact assessment report, we identify key themes and framings of risk debates and discuss which elements of the hydro-social cycle are prone to be highlighted or omitted. Our results show how different framings of risks and benefits are represented with regard to geography, time span, causative agents, impact types, those exposed, alternative management options, and uncertainties involved. Representations created both by traditional print media and new social media polarise the debate. The adoption of the concept of the hydro-social cycle in planning and communication processes may help in understanding and alleviating polarisation.
  • Turunen, Jarno; Karppinen, Anssi; Ihme, Raimo (Springer, 2019)
    SN Applied Sciences 1, 210 (2019)
    Agricultural diffuse pollution is a major environmental problem causing eutrophication of water bodies. Despite the problem is widely acknowledged, there has been relatively few major advances in mitigating the problem. We studied the effectiveness of biopolymer-based (tannin, starch, chitosan) natural coagulants/flocculants in treatment of two different agricultural wastewaters that differed in their level of phosphorus pollution and turbidity. We used jar-tests to test the effectiveness of the biopolymer coagulants in reducing water turbidity, total phosphorus, and total organic carbon (TOC) from the wastewaters. In more polluted water (total phosphorus: 300 µg/L, turbidity: 130 FNU, TOC: 30 mg/L), all tested biopolymers performed well. The best reductions for different biopolymer coagulants were 64–95%, 80–98% and 14–27%, for total phosphorus, turbidity and TOC, respectively. Tannin and chitosan coagulants performed the best at doses of 5–10 mL/L, whereas starch coagulants had the best performance at 1–2 mL/L doses. Tannin and chitosan coagulants performed clearly better than the starch coagulants. In less polluted water (total phosphorus: 74 µg/L, turbidity: 3.9 FNU, TOC: 21 mg/L), chitosan and starch coagulants did not produce flocs at any of the tested doses. Tannin coagulant performed the best at doses of 5–8 mL/L, where reductions were 70%, 82%, and 22%, for total phosphorus, turbidity and TOC, respectively. The great reductions of phosphorus and turbidity suggests that biopolymer coagulants could be applied in treatment of agricultural water pollution. The high phosphorus retention in the biodegradable biopolymer sludge suggests that the sludge can be readily used as a phosphorus fertilizer, which would aid the recycling of nutrients.
  • Macura, Biljana; Piniewski, Mikolaj; Ksiezniak, Marta; Osuch, Pawel; Haddaway, Neal R.; Ek, Filippa; Andersson, Karolin; Tattari, Sirkka (Springer Nature, 2019)
    Environmental Evidence 8, 39 (2019)
    Background Agriculture is the main sector responsible for nutrient emissions in the Baltic Sea Region and there is a growing pressure to identify cost-effective solutions towards reducing nitrogen and phosphorus loads originating from farming activities. Recycling resources from agricultural waste is central to the idea of a circular economy, and has the potential to address the most urgent problems related to nutrients use in the food chain, such as depletion of natural phosphorus reserves, water pollution and waste management. This systematic map examined what evidence exists relating to the effectiveness of ecotechnologies in agriculture for the recovery and reuse of carbon and/or nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) in the Baltic Sea region and other comparable boreo-temperate systems. Methods We searched for both academic and grey literature. English language searches were performed in 5 bibliographic databases and search platforms, and Google Scholar. Searches in 36 specialist websites were performed in English, Finnish, Polish and Swedish. The searches were restricted to the period 2013 to 2017. Eligibility screening was conducted at two levels: title and abstract (screened concurrently for efficiency) and full text. Meta-data was extracted from eligible studies including bibliographic details, study location, ecotechnology name and description, type of outcome (i.e. recovered or reused carbon and/or nutrients), type of ecotechnology in terms of recovery source, and type of reuse (in terms of the end-product). Findings are presented here narratively and in a searchable database, and are also visualised in a web-based evidence atlas (an interactive geographical information system). In addition, knowledge gaps and clusters have been identified in the evidence base and described in detail. Results We found 173 articles studying the effectiveness of 177 ecotechnologies. The majority of eligible articles were in English, originated from bibliographic databases and were published in 2016. Most studies with reported locations, and given our boreo-temperate scope, were conducted in Europe and North America. The three most prevalent ecotechnologies in the evidence base (collectively 40.7%) were; soil amendments, anaerobic digestion and (vermi)composting. Manure was the principal waste source used for recovery of nutrients or carbon, making up 55.4% of the all studies in evidence base, followed by a combination of manure and crop residues (22%). There were 51 studies with 14 ecotechnologies that reported on recovery of carbon and nutrients together, predominantly via (vermi)composting and anaerobic digestion. Only 27 studies focused on reuse of recovered nutrients and carbon through soil amendments. Conclusions This systematic map report provides an evidence base that can be useful for researchers and decision-makers in policy and practice working on transformation from linear to circular economy in the agricultural waste sector. Three potential topics for future systematic reviews are: (1) effectiveness of products recovered from different types of agricultural wastes as soil amendments or fertilizers; (2) effectiveness of anaerobic digestion as an ecotechnology used for recovery of nutrients and carbon; (3) effectiveness of composting and/or vermicomposting as ecotechnologies used for recovery of nutrients and carbon.
  • Kujala, Katharina; Laamanen, Tiina; Khan, Uzair Akbar; Besold, Johannes; Planer-Friedrich, Britta (Elsevier BV, 2022)
    Soil Biology and Biochemistry
    Arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) from mining-affected waters are efficiently removed in two treatment peatlands (TPs) in Northern Finland. However, the exact mechanisms behind this removal are not well resolved. Thus, the present study combines results from microcosm experiments and pilot-scale TPs on the effects of microbes, temperature, and carbon substrate to elucidate the role of peat microorganisms in As and Sb removal. The main As and Sb species in TP inflow water are arsenate and antimonate. In peat microcosms, they were quantitatively reduced, however, at rates about 20–400 times lower than previously reported from pure cultures, likely due to excess of other terminal electron acceptors, such as nitrate and sulfate. Addition of the microbial inhibitor sodium azide inhibited reduction, indicating that it is indeed microbially mediated. Arsenite and antimonite (re)oxidation, which is in situ likely limited to upper, oxic peat layers, was likewise observed in peat microcosms. Only for antimonite, oxidation also occurred abiotically, likely catalyzed by humic acids or metals. Process rates increased with increasing temperature, but all processes occurred also at low temperatures. Monitoring of pilot-scale TPs revealed only minor effects of winter conditions (i.e., low temperature and freezing) on arsenic and antimony removal. Formation of methylated oxyarsenates was observed to increase As mobility at the onset of freezing. From different carbon substrates tested, lactate slightly enhanced arsenate reduction and antimonate reduction was stimulated by acetate, lactate, and formate. However, a maximum rate enhancement of only 1.8 times indicates that carbon substrate availability is not the rate-limiting factor in microbial arsenate or antimonate reduction. The collective data indicate that microorganisms catalyze reduction and (re)oxidation of As and Sb species in the TPs, and even though temperature is a major factor controlling microbial As and Sb reduction/(re)oxidation, low inflow concentrations, long water residence times, and the presence of unfrozen peat in lower layers allow for efficient removal also under winter conditions.
  • Undeman, Emma; Rasmusson, Kristina; Kokorite, Ilga; Leppänen, Matti T.; Larsen, Martin M.; Pazdro, Ksenia; Siedlewicz, Grzegorz (Elsevier BV, 2022)
    Marine Pollution Bulletin
    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) transmit many chemical contaminants to aquatic environments. Quantitative data on micropollutant emissions via WWTPs are needed for environmental risk assessments and evaluation of mitigation measures. This study compiled published data on substances analysed in effluents from WWTPs in the Baltic Sea region, assessed country related differences in the data sets and estimated micropollutant inputs to the Baltic Sea catchment. Concentration data were found for 1090 substances analysed at 650 WWTPs. Heterogeneity and low number of data points for most substances hindered adequate comparisons of country specific concentrations. Emission estimates were made for the 280 substances analysed in at least five WWTPs in years 2010 to 2019. For selected substances, mass loads were compared to previously published estimations. The study provides data useful for national and Baltic Sea-scale pressure analysis and risk assessments. However, it also highlights the need for broad scope monitoring of micropollutants in wastewater.