Browsing by Subject "sedentary behaviour"

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  • Dumuid, Dorothea; Stanford, Tyman E.; Pedisic, Zeljko; Maher, Carol; Lewis, Lucy K.; Martin-Fernandez, Josep-Antoni; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Fogelholm, Mikael; Standage, Martyn; Tremblay, Mark S.; Olds, Timothy (2018)
    Background: Daily activity data are by nature compositional data. Accordingly, they occupy a specific geometry with unique properties that is different to standard Euclidean geometry. This study aimed to estimate the difference in adiposity associated with isotemporal reallocation between daily activity behaviours, and to compare the findings from compositional isotemporal subsitution to those obtained from traditional isotemporal substitution. Methods: We estimated the differences in adiposity (body fat%) associated with reallocating fixed durations of time (isotemporal substitution) between accelerometer-measured daily activity behaviours (sleep, sedentary time and light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) among 1728 children aged 9-11 years from Australia, Canada, Finland and the UK (International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment, 2011-2013).We generated estimates from compositional isotemporal substitution models and traditional non-compositional isotemporal substitution models. Results: Both compositional and traditional models estimated a positive (unfavourable) difference in body fat% when time was reallocated from MVPA to any other behaviour. Unlike traditional models, compositional models found the differences in estimated adiposity (1) were not necessarily symmetrical when an activity was being displaced, or displacing another (2) were not linearly related to the durations of time reallocated, and (3) varied depending on the starting composition. Conclusion: The compositional isotemporal model caters for the constrained and therefore relative nature of activity behaviour data and enables all daily behaviours to be included in a single statistical model. The traditional model treats data as real variables, thus the constrained nature of time is not accounted for, nor reflected in the findings. Findings from compositional isotemporal substitution support the importance of MVPA to children's health, and suggest that while interventions to increase MVPA may be of benefit, attention should be directed towards strategies to avoid decline in MVPA levels, particularly among already inactive children. Future applications of the compositional model can extend from pair-wise reallocations to other configurations of time-reallocation, for example, increasing MVPA at the expense of multiple other behaviours.
  • Dumuid, Dorothea; Stanford, Tyman E; Pedišić, Željko; Maher, Carol; Lewis, Lucy K; Martín-Fernández, Josep-Antoni; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Fogelholm, Mikael; Standage, Martyn; Tremblay, Mark S; Olds, Timothy (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Daily activity data are by nature compositional data. Accordingly, they occupy a specific geometry with unique properties that is different to standard Euclidean geometry. This study aimed to estimate the difference in adiposity associated with isotemporal reallocation between daily activity behaviours, and to compare the findings from compositional isotemporal subsitution to those obtained from traditional isotemporal substitution. Methods We estimated the differences in adiposity (body fat%) associated with reallocating fixed durations of time (isotemporal substitution) between accelerometer-measured daily activity behaviours (sleep, sedentary time and light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) among 1728 children aged 9–11 years from Australia, Canada, Finland and the UK (International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment, 2011–2013). We generated estimates from compositional isotemporal substitution models and traditional non-compositional isotemporal substitution models. Results Both compositional and traditional models estimated a positive (unfavourable) difference in body fat% when time was reallocated from MVPA to any other behaviour. Unlike traditional models, compositional models found the differences in estimated adiposity (1) were not necessarily symmetrical when an activity was being displaced, or displacing another (2) were not linearly related to the durations of time reallocated, and (3) varied depending on the starting composition. Conclusion The compositional isotemporal model caters for the constrained and therefore relative nature of activity behaviour data and enables all daily behaviours to be included in a single statistical model. The traditional model treats data as real variables, thus the constrained nature of time is not accounted for, nor reflected in the findings. Findings from compositional isotemporal substitution support the importance of MVPA to children’s health, and suggest that while interventions to increase MVPA may be of benefit, attention should be directed towards strategies to avoid decline in MVPA levels, particularly among already inactive children. Future applications of the compositional model can extend from pair-wise reallocations to other configurations of time-reallocation, for example, increasing MVPA at the expense of multiple other behaviours.
  • Köykkä, Katariina (Helsingfors universitet, 2017)
    Introduction. Sedentary behaviour, i.e. sitting or reclining without being otherwise physically active, has been associated with serious health consequences, independent of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Schooldays include long periods of uninterrupted sitting and schools have been recognized as a promising setting for health promotion interventions. Let’s Move It intervention was developed to reduce vocational school students’ sedentary time. As teachers have large potential to regulate students’ sedentary time in classrooms, they were trained by Let’s Move It facilitators in three 90 minute workshops to 1) decrease their students’ total sedentary time and to 2) introduce breaks to sedentary time in classrooms by using active teaching methods and activity breaks.Teacher training also included habit formation components to create sustained habitual behaviours in providing sedentary behaviour reduction for students. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the Let’s Move It teacher training, teachers’ engagement with the habit formation components, and the habit formation processes. Methods. A cluster randomised controlled trial with one intervention arm (Let’s Move It workshops for teachers) compared with a control arm (no treatment) was conducted in six school units. Altogether 236 eligible teachers were identified, of whom 118 were allocated to intervention arm and 116 to control arm. In the intervention arm, 64 teachers received the intervention. Baseline and 8-week follow-up data was collected with online questionnaires. Results. The Let’s Move It workshops for vocational school teachers were effective in increasing teachers’ reported use of classrooms sitting reductions strategies and frequency of introducing breaks to students’ sitting, but not frequency of reducing students’ total sitting time. Only 15.5 % of intervention arm teachers used habit formation techniques frequently. However, the habit formation techniques the teachers reported having used were mostly optimal for habit formation. Use of habit formation techniques was not correlated with sitting reduction automaticity. However, use of habit formation techniques was positively correlated with both use of sitting reduction strategies and frequency of reducing students’ total sedentary time. Discussion. The Let’s Move It intervention was successful in increasing vocational school teachers’ use of classroom sitting reduction strategies. Even though this study could not indicate habit formation techniques’ effectiveness in making teachers’ classroom sitting reduction practices habitual, it indicated that habit formation has potential to aid teachers’ behaviour change in this context. Further research is needed to establish acceptability, feasibility and effectiveness of habit formation in teachers’ classroom sitting reduction training.
  • Kanerva, Noora; Lallukka, Tea; Rahkonen, Ossi; Pietiläinen, Olli; Lahti, Jouni (2019)
    Physical inactivity has been associated with both insomnia symptoms and smoking. Further, they are all independently associated with increased sickness absence (SA) from work. However, joint contribution of either physical activity (PA) with insomnia symptoms or with smoking to SA and, especially, their direct cost for the employer is poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to examine these joint associations with short-term (
  • Heino, Matti TJ; Knittle, Keegan; Fried, Eiko I.; Sund, Reijo; Haukkala, Ari; Knittle, Keegan; Borodulin, Katja; Uutela, Antti; Araujo-Soares, Vera; Vasankari, Tommi; Hankonen, Nelli (2019)