Browsing by Subject "sequestration"

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  • Liu, Miao; Bi, Jingwen; Liu, Xiucheng; Kang, Jieyu; Korpelainen, Helena; Niinemets, Ulo; Li, Chunyang (2020)
    Although increasing attention has been paid to the relationships between heavy metal and nitrogen (N) availability, the mechanism underlying adaptation to cadmium (Cd) stress in dioecious plants has been largely overlooked. This study examined Cd accumulation, translocation and allocation among tissues and cellular compartments in Populus cathayana Rehder females and males. Both leaf Cd accumulation and root-to-shoot Cd translocation were significantly greater in females than in males under a normal N supply, but they were reduced in females and enhanced in males under N deficiency. The genes related to Cd uptake and translocation, HMA2, YSL2 and ZIP2, were strongly induced by Cd stress in female roots and in males under a normal N supply. Cadmium largely accumulated in the leaf blades of females and in the leaf veins of males under a normal N supply, while the contrary was true under N deficiency. Furthermore, Cd was mainly distributed in the leaf epidermis and spongy tissues of males, and in the leaf palisade tissues of females. Nitrogen deficiency increased Cd allocation to the spongy tissues of female leaves and to the palisade tissues of males. In roots, Cd was preferentially distributed to the epidermis and cortices in both sexes, and also to the vascular tissues of females under a normal N supply but not under N deficiency. These results suggested that males possess better Cd tolerance compared with females, even under N deficiency, which is associated with their reduced root-to-shoot Cd translocation, specific Cd distribution in organic and/or cellular compartments, and enhanced antioxidation and ion homeostasis. Our study also provides new insights into engineering woody plants for phytoremediation.
  • Soimakallio, Sampo; Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Lehtonen, Aleksi; Salminen, Olli (Springer, 2021)
    Mitigation and Adaption Strategies for Global Change 26: 4
    Forest biomass can be used in two different ways to limit the growth of the atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations: (1) to provide negative emissions through sequestration of carbon into forests and harvested wood products or (2) to avoid GHG emissions through substitution of non-renewable raw materials with wood. We study the trade-offs and synergies between these strategies using three different Finnish national-level forest scenarios between 2015 and 2044 as examples. We demonstrate how GHG emissions change when wood harvest rates are increased. We take into account CO2 and other greenhouse gas flows in the forest, the decay rate of harvested wood products and fossil-based CO2 emissions that can be avoided by substituting alternative materials with wood derived from increased harvests. We considered uncertainties of key parameters by using stochastic simulation. According to our results, an increase in harvest rates in Finland increased the total net GHG flow to the atmosphere virtually certainly or very likely, given the uncertainties and time frame considered. This was because the increased biomass-based CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere together with decreased carbon sequestration into the forest were very likely higher than the avoided fossil-based CO2 emissions. The reverse of this conclusion would require that compared to what was studied in this paper, the share of long-living wood products in the product mix would be higher, carbon dioxide from bioenergy production would be captured and stored, and reduction in forest carbon equivalent net sink due to wood harvesting would be minimized.
  • Lindén, Leena; Riikonen, Anu; Setälä, Heikki; Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa (2020)
    Removing CO2 from the atmosphere and storing carbon in vegetation and soil are important ecosystem services provided by urban green space. However, knowledge on the capacity of trees and soils to store carbon in urban parks - especially in the northern latitudes - is scarce. We assessed the amount of organic carbon stored in trees and soil of constructed urban parks under cold climatic conditions in Finland. More specifically, we investigated the effects of management, vegetation type and time since construction on the amount of carbon stored in park trees and soil. We conducted two tree surveys and collected soil samples (0 to 90 cm) in constructed parks managed by the city of Helsinki. The estimated overall carbon density was approximately 130 t per park hectare, when the carbon stock of trees was 22 to 28 t ha-1 and that of soil 104 t ha-1 at the very least. The soil to tree carbon storage ratio varied from 7.1 to 7.5 for vegetated, pervious grounds and from 3.7 to 5.0 for entire park areas. The effects of park management and vegetation type could not be entirely separated in our data, but time was shown to have a distinct, positive effect on tree and soil carbon stocks. The results indicate that park soils can hold remarkable carbon stocks in a cold climate. It also seems that park soil carbon holding capacity largely exceeds that of forested soils in Finland. Preservation and augmentation of carbon stocks in urban parks implies avoidance of drastic tree and soil renovation measures.