Browsing by Subject "small for gestational age"

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  • Lahti-Pulkkinen, Marius; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Räikkönen, Katri; Osmond, Clive; Norman, Jane E.; Reynolds, Rebecca M. (2018)
    While previous studies have shown intergenerational transmission of birth weight from mother to child, whether the continuity persists across 3 generations has rarely been assessed. We used the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Data-bank (United Kingdom) to examine the intergenerational correlations of birth weight, birth weight adjusted for gestational age and sex, and small- and large-for-gestational-age births across 3 generations among 1,457 grandmother-mother-child triads. All participants were born between 1950 and 2015. The intergenerational transmission was examined with linear regression analyses. We found that grandmaternal birth weight was associated with grandchild birth weight, independently of prenatal and sociodemographic covariates and maternal birth weight (B = 0.12 standard deviation units, 95% confidence interval: 0.07, 0.18). Similar intergenerational continuity was found for birth weight adjusted for sex and gestational age as well as for small-for-gestational-age births. In conclusion, birth weight and fetal growth showed intergenerational continuity across 3 generations. This supports the hypothesis that the developmental origins of birth weight and hence later health and disease are already present in earlier generations.
  • Lehikoinen, Anni; Voutilainen, Raimo; Romppanen, Jarkko; Heinonen, Seppo (2020)
    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether first trimester trisomy screening (FTS) parameters are affected by alcohol and drug use. Methods: A routine combined FTS including measurements of maternal serum levels of free beta-human chorionic gonadotropin subunit (free beta-hCG) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) were measured at 9-11 weeks of gestation, and fetal nuchal translucency thickness (NTT) at 11-13 weeks of gestation. In total 544 women with singleton pregnancies [71 alcohol and drug abusers, 88 smokers, 168 non-smokers delivering a small for gestational age (SGA) child, and 217 unexposed control women] were assessed. Results: Free beta-hCG levels were higher in alcohol and drug abusing than in unexposed pregnant women [mean 1.5 vs. 1.2 multiples of medians (MoM); P=0.013]. However, stepwise multiple linear regression analyses suggested that smoking could explain increased free beta-hCG. Additionally, we observed lower PAPP-A levels in the smoking mothers (0.9 vs. 1.2 MoM; P=0.045) and in those giving birth to an SGA child compared to the controls (1.1 vs.. 1.2 MoM; P Conclusions: The present study shows increased free beta-hCG levels in alcohol and drug abusers, but maternal smoking may explain the result. Maternal serum PAPP-A levels were lower in smoking than non-smoking mothers, and in mothers delivering an SGA child. However, FTS parameters (PAPP-A, free beta-hCG and NTT) seem not to be applicable for the use as alcohol biomarkers because of their clear overlap between alcohol abusers and healthy controls.
  • Lehikoinen, Anni; Voutilainen, Raimo; Romppanen, Jarkko; Heinonen, Seppo (BioMed Central, 2020)
    Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine whether first trimester trisomy screening (FTS) parameters are affected by alcohol and drug use. Methods A routine combined FTS including measurements of maternal serum levels of free β-human chorionic gonadotropin subunit (free β-hCG) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) were measured at 9–11 weeks of gestation, and fetal nuchal translucency thickness (NTT) at 11–13 weeks of gestation. In total 544 women with singleton pregnancies [71 alcohol and drug abusers, 88 smokers, 168 non-smokers delivering a small for gestational age (SGA) child, and 217 unexposed control women] were assessed. Results Free β-hCG levels were higher in alcohol and drug abusing than in unexposed pregnant women [mean 1.5 vs. 1.2 multiples of medians (MoM); P = 0.013]. However, stepwise multiple linear regression analyses suggested that smoking could explain increased free β-hCG. Additionally, we observed lower PAPP-A levels in the smoking mothers (0.9 vs. 1.2 MoM; P = 0.045) and in those giving birth to an SGA child compared to the controls (1.1 vs.. 1.2 MoM; P < 0.001). Fetal NTT did not differ significantly between any of the groups. Conclusions The present study shows increased free β-hCG levels in alcohol and drug abusers, but maternal smoking may explain the result. Maternal serum PAPP-A levels were lower in smoking than non-smoking mothers, and in mothers delivering an SGA child. However, FTS parameters (PAPP-A, free β-hCG and NTT) seem not to be applicable for the use as alcohol biomarkers because of their clear overlap between alcohol abusers and healthy controls.