Browsing by Subject "spring"

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  • Park, Sung-Bin; Knohl, Alexander; Migliavacca, Mirco; Thum, Tea; Vesala, Timo; Peltola, Olli; Mammarella, Ivan; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kolle, Olaf; Lavric, Jost; Park, Sang Seo; Heimann, Martin (2021)
    Climate change impacts the characteristics of the vegetation carbon-uptake process in the northern Eurasian terrestrial ecosystem. However, the currently available direct CO2 flux measurement datasets, particularly for central Siberia, are insufficient for understanding the current condition in the northern Eurasian carbon cycle. Here, we report daily and seasonal interannual variations in CO2 fluxes and associated abiotic factors measured using eddy covariance in a coniferous forest and a bog near Zotino, Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia, for April to early June, 2013-2017. Despite the snow not being completely melted, both ecosystems became weak net CO2 sinks if the air temperature was warm enough for photosynthesis. The forest became a net CO2 sink 7-16 days earlier than the bog. After the surface soil temperature exceeded similar to 1 degrees C, the ecosystems became persistent net CO2 sinks. Net ecosystem productivity was highest in 2015 for both ecosystems because of the anomalously high air temperature in May compared with other years. Our findings demonstrate that long-term monitoring of flux measurements at the site level, particularly during winter and its transition to spring, is essential for understanding the responses of the northern Eurasian ecosystem to spring warming.
  • Karppinen, Toni; Ala-Houhala, Meri; Ylianttila, Lasse; Kautiainen, Hannu; Lakkala, Kaisa; Hannula, Henna-Reetta; Turunen, Esa; Viljakainen, Heli; Reunala, Timo; Snellman, Erna (2017)
    Humans obtain vitamin D from conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol in the skin by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation or from dietary sources. As the radiation level is insufficient in winter, vitamin D deficiency is common at higher latitudes. We assessed whether vernal solar UVB radiation at latitudes 61 degrees N and 67 degrees N in Finland has an impact on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [S-25(OH) D] concentrations. Twenty-seven healthy volunteers participated in outdoor activities in snow-covered terrain for 4-10 days in March or April, with their face and hands sun-exposed. The personal UVB doses and S-25(OH) D levels were monitored. A mean UVB dose of 11.8 standard erythema doses (SED) was received during an average of 12.3 outdoor hours. The mean S-25(OH) D concentration in subjects with a baseline concentration below 90.0 nmol/L (n=13) increased significantly, by 6.0 nmol/L from an initial mean of 62.4 nmol/L (p