Browsing by Subject "student"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-3 of 3
  • Hintsala, Sonja (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    Objectives. About a third of the population is highly sensitive in temperament. One of the most important research topics in educational psychology is learning, one aspect of which is learning strategies. Learning strategies and high sensitivity have been studied separately in the past, but there is very little research linking the two. The purpose of this study was to provide information on the relationship between high sensitivity to the use of learning strategies. The research task is to describe what kind of learning strategies are used by highly sensitive and non-highly sensitive students and to investigate how high sensitivity explains the use of learning strategies. Methods. The material was collected using an electronic questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of a sensitivity test, a section measuring learning strategies, an open-ended question, and background information. The data were analyzed by linear regression analysis using the deletion method. The entire data set (n = 202) consisted of adult people who, according to the research questions, were limited to either highly sensitive students (n = 117), non-highly sensitive students (n = 12) or students (n = 129). Results and conclusions. Elaboration and organization (M = 3.85) were the highest of the means (M), when describing the use of learning strategies by highly sensitive students (n = 117). These two learning strategies, as well as the in-depth treatment of high sensitivity, aim to build connections between things and connect new knowledge with the previous one. This similarity may explain the popularity of using these two strategies with highly sensitive persons. According to the regression analysis, the high sensitivity test positively explained 2% the use of organization statistically significantly (p < .05) and 7.4% the use of critical thinking statistically significantly (p < .001). The strategy of the organization is in line with the in-depth treatment of high sensitivity, as both seek to make connections between things. The strategy of critical thinking is consistent with an inhibition, which is a typical behavior for a highly sensitive person. The main principle in both of these strategies is to use previous information in new situations. These similarities may serve as an explanation for the fact that the high sensitivity test explains the use of organizational and critical thinking learning strategies in a statistically significant way.
  • Rouhiainen, Vilma (Helsingin yliopisto, 2021)
    Introduction: Many studies, globally, have aimed at elucidating reasons to choose a career in dentistry. The most common motives found are reasonable working hours and aspiration to help. The aim of this study was to explore whether eventual past personal experience of orthodontic treatment and particularly the interpersonal skills of the treating orthodontist are of significance in this respect. Materials and methods: An electronic questionnaire, consisting of multiple choice and descriptive questions about dental history and experiences in dental care, was sent to dental and, as controls, psychology students within the same Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. The answers between the two groups were compared and differences tested statistically. Results: The questionnaire was answered by 143 (46.0%) dental students and 94 (17.6%) psychology students. Dental students, compared to psychology students, had more positive views of their dentition and dental treatment in general (P=0.000). Among participants, 47.9% of dental students and 57.4% of psychology students had received orthodontic treatment. Of those, dental students had perceived their orthodontic treatment as less painful (P=0.001) and less uncomfortable (P=0.000) than psychology students. Moreover, dental students reported more often experiences of orthodontist taking into account their situation in life during treatment (P=0.011), and gave more positive descriptions of the orthodontist’s interpersonal skills (P=0.031). Conclusions: Dental students, compared to psychology students, had statistically significantly more positive personal experiences related to dentistry and orthodontics, supporting our hypothesis that positive experiences with orthodontic treatment likely increases the probability of choosing dentistry as the future career.
  • Rouhiainen, V; Karaharju-Suvanto, T; Waltimo-Siren, J (2021)
    Introduction Many studies, globally, have aimed at elucidating reasons to choose a career in dentistry. The most common motives found are reasonable working hours and aspiration to help. The aim of this study was to explore whether eventual past personal experience of orthodontic treatment and particularly the interpersonal skills of the treating orthodontist are of significance in this respect. Materials and methods An electronic questionnaire, consisting of multiple choice and descriptive questions about dental history and experiences in dental care, was sent to dental and, as controls, psychology students within the same Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. The answers between the two groups were compared and differences tested statistically. Results The questionnaire was answered by 143 (46.0%) dental students and 94 (17.6%) psychology students. Dental students, compared to psychology students, had more positive views of their dentition and dental treatment in general (p = 0.000). Amongst participants, 47.9% of dental students and 57.4% of psychology students had received orthodontic treatment. Of those, dental students had perceived their orthodontic treatment as less painful (p = 0.001) and less uncomfortable (p = 0.000) than psychology students. Moreover, dental students reported more often experiences of orthodontist taking into account their situation in life during treatment (p = 0.011) and gave more positive descriptions of the orthodontist's interpersonal skills (p = 0.031). Conclusions Dental students, compared to psychology students, had statistically significantly more positive personal experiences related to dentistry and orthodontics, supporting our hypothesis that positive experiences with orthodontic treatment likely increase the probability of choosing dentistry as the future career.