Browsing by Subject "study success"

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  • Ketonen, Elina (Helsingfors universitet, 2011)
    Previous studies indicate that positive learning experiences are related to academic achievement as well as to well-being. On the other hand, emotional and motivational problems in studying may pose a risk for both academic achievement and well-being. Thus, emotions and motivation have an increasing role in explaining university students learning and studying. The relations between emotions, motivation, study success and well-being have been less frequently studied. The aim of this study was to investigate what kind of academic emotions, motivational factors and problems in studying students experienced five days before an exam of an activating lecture course, and the relations among these factors as well as their relation to self-study time and study success. Furthermore, the effect of all these factors on well-being, flow experience and academic achievement was examined. The term academic emotion was defined as emotion experienced in academic settings and related to studying. In the present study the theoretical background to motivational factors was based on thinking strategies and attributions, flow experience and task value. Problems in studying were measured in terms of exhaustion, anxiety, stress, lack of interest, lack of self-regulation and procrastination. The data were collected in December 2009 in an activating educational psychology lecture course by using a questionnaire. The participants (n=107) were class and kindergarten teacher students from the University of Helsinki. Most of them were first year students. The course grades were also gathered. Correlations and stepwise regression analysis were carried out to find out the factors that were related to or explained study success. The clusters that presented students' problems in studying as well as thinking strategies and attributions, were found through hierarchical cluster analysis. K-means cluster analysis was used to form the final groups. One-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test and crosstabs were conducted to see whether the students in different clusters varied in terms of study success, academic emotions, task value, flow, and background variables. The results indicated that academic emotions measured five days before the exam explained about 30 % of the variance of the course grade; exhaustion and interest positively, and anxiety negatively. In addition, interest as well as the self-study time best explained study success on the course. The participants were classified into three clusters according to their problems in studying as well as their thinking strategies and attributions: 1) ill-being, 2) carefree, and 3) committed and optimistic students. Ill-being students reported most negative emotions, achieved the worst grades, experienced anxiety rather than flow and were also the youngest. Carefree students, on the other hand, expressed the least negative emotions and spent the least time on self-studying, and like committed students, experienced flow. In addition, committed students reported positive emotions the most often and achieved the best grades on the course. In the future, more in-depth understanding how and why especially young first year students experience their studying hard is needed, because early state of the studies is shown to predict later study success.
  • Kyrklund, Paulina (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    Objectives: The objective of this study was to find out what kinds of approaches to learning can be found among first year medical students and how approaches to learning are affecting study success. In addition, to find out how stressed or exhausted students are in their studies. The aim was also determine how approaches to learning and stress and exhaustion are related to study success. Previous studies have shown approaches to learning can be considered as central factors affecting students learning. Student's approaches to learning can be divided to three: surface approach, deep approach and strategic approach. Based on previous studies, it has been indicated that approaches to learning and study success are related to each other. Surface approaches has been associated with poor study success and deep approaches has been associated with qualitatively better learning outcomes and study success. In addition, student learning approaches have been shown to be related to perceived workload. The conclusion has been that high perceived workload can induce students to employ a surface approach. Method: The participants (n=93) were first-year students of medicine at the University of Helsinki. The data were collected during spring 2011 by using a web based questionnaire. Study success information was included in the data. Correlations, regression analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to examine the interconnections of approaches to learning, heavy workload, stress and and their effects on the study success. Results and conclusions: Three different approaches to learning were recognized: surface approach, Deep approach and strategic approach. The highest average was found from student using strategic approach and the lowest average was from student using surface approach. Study success among medical students was extremely high. Students, who showed a surface approach to learning, felt exhausted. Medical students stress and perceived workload weren't high. The only predictor for study success was deep approach.
  • Alavilo, Suvi (Helsingfors universitet, 2016)
    Previous studies have shown that both self-regulated learning and cognitive-attributional strategies are related to academic success and proceeding in studies. It seems that student's skills in self-regulation could be weaker in the beginning of studies in higher education rather than in the master degree studies. However there is still too little information regarding different phases of studies. In this study my intention was to investigate the self-regulation skills and cognitive-attributional strategies of students in the faculty of humanities. My focus was in two type of study phase that is bachelor students whose studies are delayed compared to how they should have proceeded. And another group was students in master degree. I also used cluster analysis in order to form student profiles based on their values on self-regulation and cognitive-attributional strategies. My interest was also to find out how masters and bachelors were situated in these profiles. Each profiles study success was evaluated according to GPA. The questionnaire and given data was produced by The Helsinki University Centre for Research and Development of Higher Education along with the Faculty of Humanities in the University of Helsinki. The questionnaire included statements regarding self-regulated learning and cognitive-attributional strategies. There is no statistically significant difference in self-regulated learning between masters and bachelors. However masters seem to use more optimistic strategy and less self-handicapping strategy compared to bachelors. Following profiles were based on self-regulated learning and cognitive-attributional strategies: A) Task avoidant and skillful students in self-regulation B) Optimistic and skillful students in self-regulation C) Optimistic and students who have weak skills in self-regulation and D) Task avoidant and students who have weak skills in self-regulation. The majority of masters situated in profile B and majority of bachelors situated in profile A. According to results in this study students in profile B were most successful in their studies and less successful were students in profile D. Using optimistic strategy does not compensate the lack of skills in self-regulation and on the other hand those who have good skills in self-regulation don't seem to have best benefit from them if they use self-handicapping strategy and not optimistic strategy. Support should be focused not only in improving skills in self-regulation but also in helping those students who seem to use self-handicapping strategy even though they would have good skills in self-regulation.