Browsing by Subject "suicidal ideation"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-4 of 4
  • Söderholm, John J.; Socada, J. Lumikukka; Rosenström, Tom; Ekelund, Jesper; Isometsä, Erkki T. (2020)
    ObjectiveWe investigated risk factors for suicidal ideation and behavior among currently depressed patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), major depressive episode (MDE) in bipolar disorder (BD), or MDE with comorbid borderline personality disorder (MDE/BPD). We compared current and lifetime prevalence of suicidal ideation and behavior, and investigated dimensional measures of BPD or mixed affective features of the MDE as indicators of risk.MethodsBased on screening of 1,655 referrals, we recruited 124 psychiatric secondary care outpatients with MDE and stratified them into three subcohorts (MDD, BD, and MDE/BPD) using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV I and II. We examined suicidal ideation and behavior with the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (CSSRS). In addition, we quantified the severity of BPD symptoms and BD mixed features both categorically/diagnostically and dimensionally (using instruments such as the Borderline Personality Disorder Severity Index) in two time frames.ResultsThere were highly significant differences between the lifetime prevalences of suicide attempts between the subcohorts, with attempts reported by 16% of the MDD, 30% of the BD, and 60% of the BPD subcohort. Remarkably, the lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts in patients with comorbid BD and BPD exceeded 90%. The severity of BPD features was independently associated with risk of suicide attempts both lifetime and during the current MDE. It also associated in a dose-dependent manner with recent severity of ideation in both BPD and non-BPD patients. In multinominal logistic regression models, hopelessness was the most consistent independent risk factor for severe suicidal ideation in both time frames, whereas younger age and more severe BPD features were most consistently associated with suicide attempts.ConclusionsAmong patients with major depressive episodes, diagnosis of bipolar disorder, or presence of comorbid borderline personality features both imply remarkably high risk of suicide attempts. Risk factors for suicidal ideation and suicidal acts overlap, but may not be identical. The estimated severity of borderline personality features seems to associate with history of suicidal behavior and current severity of suicidal ideation in dose-dependent fashion among all mood disorder patients. Therefore, reliable assessment of borderline features may advance the evaluation of suicide risk.
  • Baryshnikov, Ilya; Isometsä, Erkki (2022)
    Despite accumulation of clinical research on risk factors for suicidal process, understanding of the mechanisms and pathways underlying the emergence of suicidal thoughts and their progression to acts is insufficient. The suicidal process has been conceptualized in multiple psychological theories that have aimed to shed light on the interplay of contributing factors. One of the central concepts included in both the cubic model of suicide and the three-step theory of suicide is psychological pain (mental pain or psychache). Over the two last decades, interest in psychological pain has increased considerably, particularly since the discovery of the complex link between the pain processing system and the neurobiology of suicide, and the putative antisuicidal effect of buprenorphine. Growing evidence supports the association between experiencing psychological pain and suicidal ideation and acts in both clinical and non-clinical samples. However, many questions related to the concept of psychological pain and its role in prediction of suicidal behavior remain to be answered in future research. In this narrative review, we have outlined the history of the concept, the definition of psychological pain, and the tools developed for its measurement, summarized the empirical research on psychological pain in relation to suicidal behavior, and suggested future directions for clinical research on psychological pain and suicidal behavior.
  • Grano, Niklas; Oksanen, Jorma; Kallionpää, Santeri; Roine, Mikko (2017)
    Previous studies have shown an association between hopelessness and suicidal behaviour in clinical populations. The aim of the study was to investigate sensitivity, specificity, and predictive validity of the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) for suicidal ideation in adolescents who show early risk signs on the psychiatric disorder continuum. Three-hundred and two help-seeking adolescents (mean age=15.5 years) who were entering an early intervention team at Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland, completed questionnaires of BHS and suicidal ideation, derived from Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Results suggest that a BHS cut-off score 8 (sensitivity=0.70, specificity=0.76) or cut-off score 9 (sensitivity=0.63, specificity=0.80) may be useful to detect suicidal ideation with BHS in help-seeking adolescents population. Results remain mainly the same in a separate analysis with adolescents at risk for psychosis. The results support previous cut-off points for BHS in identification of suicidal ideation. The results suggest also that lower cut-off scores may be useful in sense of sensitivity, especially in clinical settings.
  • Salama, Essi; Castaneda, Anu E.; Suvisaari, Jaana; Rask, Shadia; Laatikainen, Tiina; Niemelä, Solja (2022)
    Comorbidity of substance use with affective symptoms and suicidality has been well documented in the general population. However, population-based migrant studies about this association are scarce. We examined the association of affective symptoms and suicidal ideation with binge drinking, daily smoking, and lifetime cannabis use among Russian, Somali, and Kurdish migrants in comparison with the Finnish general population. Cross-sectional data from the Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study (Maamu, n?=?1307) and comparison group data of the general Finnish population (n?=?860) from the Health 2011 Survey were used. Substance use included self-reported current binge drinking, daily smoking, and lifetime cannabis use. Affective symptoms and suicidal ideation were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25). We performed multivariate logistic regression analyses, including age, gender, and additional socio-demographic and migration-related factors. Suicidal ideation (OR 2.4 95% CI 1.3?4.3) was associated with binge drinking among Kurds and lifetime cannabis use among Russians (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.9?17.0) and Kurds (OR 5.5, 95% CI 1.9?15.6). Affective symptoms were associated with daily smoking (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.02?2.6) and lifetime cannabis use (OR 6.1, 95% CI 2.6?14.5) among Kurdish migrants. Our results draw attention to the co-occurrence of suicidal ideation, affective symptoms, and substance use, especially among Kurdish migrants. These results highlight the variation of comorbidity of substance use and affective symptoms between the different populations. This implies that screening for substance use in mental healthcare cannot be neglected based on presumed habits of substance use.