Browsing by Subject "techniques: spectroscopic"

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  • Martikainen, Julia; Penttilä, Antti; Gritsevich, M.; Videen, Gorden; Muinonen, Karri Olavi (2019)
    We present a new physics-based approach to model the absolute reflectance spectra of asteroid (4) Vesta. The spectral models are derived by utilizing a ray-optics code that simulates light scattering by particles large compared to the wavelength of the incident light. In the light of the spectral data obtained by the Dawn spacecraft, we use howardite powder to model Vesta's surface regolith and its particle size distribution for 10-200 mu m sized particles. Our results show that the modelled spectrum mimics well the observations. The best match was found using a power-law particle size distribution with an index 3.2. This suggests that Vesta's regolith is dominated by howardite particles
  • Penttilä, Antti; Hietala, Hilppa; Muinonen, Karri (2021)
    Aims. We explore the performance of neural networks in automatically classifying asteroids into their taxonomic spectral classes. We particularly focus on what the methodology could offer the ESA Gaia mission.Methods. We constructed an asteroid dataset that can be limited to simulating Gaia samples. The samples were fed into a custom-designed neural network that learns how to predict the samples' spectral classes and produces the success rate of the predictions. The performance of the neural network is also evaluated using three real preliminary Gaia asteroid spectra.Results. The overall results show that the neural network can identify taxonomic classes of asteroids in a robust manner. The success in classification is evaluated for spectra from the nominal 0.45-2.45 mu m wavelength range used in the Bus-DeMeo taxonomy, and from a limited range of 0.45-1.05 mu m following the joint wavelength range of Gaia observations and the Bus-DeMeo taxonomic system.Conclusions. The obtained results indicate that using neural networks to execute automated classification is an appealing solution for maintaining asteroid taxonomies, especially as the size of the available datasets grows larger with missions like Gaia.
  • Chrbolková, Kateřina; Brunetto, Rosario; Ďurech, Josef; Kohout, Tomáš; Mizohata, Kenichiro; Malý, Petr; Dědič, Václav; Lantz, Cateline; Penttilä, Antti; Trojánek, František; Maturilli, Alessandro (2021)
    Context. Space weathering is a process that changes the surface of airless planetary bodies. Prime space weathering agents are solar wind irradiation and micrometeoroid bombardment. These processes alter planetary reflectance spectra and often modify their compositional diagnostic features. Aims. In this work we focused on simulating and comparing the spectral changes caused by solar wind irradiation and by micrometeoroid bombardment to gain a better understanding of these individual space weathering processes. Methods. We used olivine and pyroxene pellets as proxies for planetary materials. To simulate solar wind irradiation we used hydrogen, helium, and argon ions with energies from 5 to 40 keV and fluences of up to 10(18) particles cm(-2). To simulate micrometeoroid bombardment we used individual femtosecond laser pulses. We analysed the corresponding evolution of different spectral parameters, which we determined by applying the Modified Gaussian Model, and we also conducted principal component analysis. Results. The original mineralogy of the surface influences the spectral evolution more than the weathering agent, as seen from the diverse evolution of the spectral slope of olivine and pyroxene upon irradiation. The spectral slope changes seen in olivine are consistent with observations of A-type asteroids, while the moderate to no slope changes observed in pyroxene are consistent with asteroid (4) Vesta. We also observed some differences in the spectral effects induced by the two weathering agents. Ions simulating solar wind have a smaller influence on longer wavelengths of the spectra than laser irradiation simulating micrometeoroid impacts. This is most likely due to the different penetration depths of ions and laser pulses. Our results suggest that in some instances it might be possible to distinguish between the contributions of the two agents on a weathered surface.
  • Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Kryszczynska, Agnieszka; Kankiewicz, Pawel; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Skiff, Brian A.; Leith, Thomas B.; Durech, Josef; Wlodarczyk, Ireneusz; Marciniak, Anna; Geier, Stefan; Fedorets, Grigori; Troianskyi, Volodymyr; Fohring, Dora (2019)
    Context. Asteroid (2579) Spartacus is a small V-type object located in the inner main belt. This object shows spectral characteristics unusual for typical Vestoids, which may indicate an origin deeper than average within Vesta or an origin from an altogether different parent body. Aims. Our main goal is to study the origin of Spartacus. We derive the spin of Spartacus and a convex shape model of Spartacus in order to increase the knowledge of the body's physical properties. The rotational parameters are then used to investigate dynamical evolution of the object as well as to distinguish regions sampled by spectral observations to determine whether its surface displays heterogeneity. Methods. We collected lightcurves available from the literature (oppositions of 2009, 2012) and obtained additional photometric observations at various telescopes in 2016, 2017, and 2018. We used the lightcurve inversion method to derive a spin and convex shape model. We have collected spectral observations over two rotational periods of Spartacus and determined its spectral parameters using the modified Gaussian model (MGM). We then dynamically integrated the orbital elements of Spartacus, taking into account existing information, including its thermal properties, size and the derived spin axis orientation. Results. We find two models for (2579) Spartacus: (a) lambda = 312 degrees +/- 5 degrees, beta = -57 degrees +/- 5 degrees and (b) lambda = 113 degrees +/- 5 degrees, beta = -60 degrees +/- 5 degrees both retrograde. We find that the drift direction for Spartacus is consistent with separation from Vesta, and after a backward integration of 1 Gyr the asteroid reaches the boundary of the family. We did not observe spectral variations with rotation, thus the body most likely has a homogeneous surface. Additionally, new spectral analysis indicates that the 1.0 and 2.0 mu m band centers are within ranges that are typical for Vestoids while the area ratio of these bands is about half that of typical Vestoids. Conclusions. The asteroid (2579) Spartacus is in retrograde rotation and has a drift direction consistent with an origin from Vesta. The revised spectral band centers are within ranges typical for Vestoids, while band area ratio (BAR) is unusually low compared to that of other V-types. The dynamical model shows that the asteroid could have migrated to its current location from the edges of the Vesta family within 1 Gyr, but an origin from an earlier impact on Vesta could also be plausible.