Browsing by Subject "tissue specificity"

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  • Nikkanen, Joni; Landoni, Juan Cruz; Balboa, Diego; Haugas, Maarja; Partanen, Juha; Paetau, Anders; Isohanni, Pirjo; Brilhante, Virginia; Suomalainen, Anu (2018)
    DNA polymerase gamma (POLG), the mtDNA replicase, is a common cause of mitochondrial neurodegeneration. Why POLG defects especially cause central nervous system (CNS) diseases is unknown. We discovered a complex genomic regulatory locus for POLG, containing three functional CNS-specific enhancers that drive expression specifically in oculomotor complex and sensory interneurons of the spinal cord, completely overlapping with the regions showing neuronal death in POLG patients. The regulatory locus also expresses two functional RNAs, LINC00925-RNA and MIR9-3, which are coexpressed with POLG. The MIR9-3 targets include NR2E1, a transcription factor maintaining neural stem cells in undifferentiated state, and MTHFD2, the regulatory enzyme of mitochondrial folate cycle, linking POLG expression to stem cell differentiation and folate metabolism. Our evidence suggests that distant genomic non-coding regions contribute to regulation of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. Such genomic arrangement of POLG locus, driving expression to CNS regions affected in POLG patients, presents a potential mechanism for CNS-specific manifestations in POLG disease.
  • Bos, Nick; Pulliainen, Unni; Sundström, Liselotte; Freitak, Dalial (2016)
    Starvation is one of the most common and severe stressors in nature. Not only does it lead to death if not alleviated, it also forces the starved individual to allocate resources only to the most essential processes. This creates energetic trade-offs which can lead to many secondary challenges for the individual. These energetic trade-offs could be exacerbated in inbred individuals, which have been suggested to have a less efficient metabolism. Here, we studied the effect of inbreeding on starvation resistance in a natural population of Formica exsecta ants, with a focus on survival and tissue-specific expression of stress, metabolism and immunity-related genes. Starvation led to large tissue-specific changes in gene expression, but inbreeding had little effect on most of the genes studied. Our results illustrate the importance of studying stress responses in different tissues instead of entire organisms.
  • Jha, Sweta; Holmberg, Carina I. (2020)
    The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) and the autophagy–lysosomal pathway (ALP) are the two main eukaryotic intracellular proteolytic systems involved in maintaining proteostasis. Several studies have reported on the interplay between the UPS and ALP, however it remains largely unknown how compromised autophagy affects UPS function in vivo. Here, we have studied the crosstalk between the UPS and ALP by investigating the tissue-specific effect of autophagy genes on the UPS at an organismal level. Using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans expressing fluorescent UPS reporters, we show that the downregulation of the autophagy genes lgg-1 and lgg-2 (ATG8/LC3/GABARAP), bec-1 (BECLIN1), atg-7 (ATG7) and epg-5 (mEPG5) by RNAi decreases proteasomal degradation, concomitant with the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteasomal substrates in a tissue-specific manner. For some of these genes, the changes in proteasomal degradation occur without a detectable alteration in proteasome tissue expression levels. In addition, the lgg-1 RNAi-induced reduction in proteasome activity in intestinal cells is not dependent on sqst-1/p62 accumulation. Our results illustrate that compromised autophagy can affect UPS in a tissue-specific manner, and demonstrate that UPS does not function as a direct compensatory mechanism in an animal. Further, a more profound understanding of the multilayered crosstalk between UPS and ALP can facilitate the development of therapeutic options for various disorders linked to dysfunction in proteostasis.