Browsing by Subject "trees"

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  • Makkonen, Olli (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1967)
  • Tammeorg, Priit; Soronen, Päivi Anneli; Riikonen, Anu; Salo, Esko; Tikka, Suvi Maria; Koivunen, Minja; Salonen, Anna-Reetta; Kopakkala, Topi Pietari; Jalas, Mikko (2021)
    In order to achieve the goals of carbon (C) neutrality within next 20 year, municipalities worldwide need to increasingly apply negative emission technologies. We focus on the main principles of urban demonstration areas using biochars for C sequestration and explore the lessons learned from a co-creation process of one such park, Hyvantoivonpuisto in Helsinki, Finland. Demonstration sites of urban C sinks in public parks must be safe, visible and scientifically sound for reliable and cost-effective verification of carbon sequestration. We find that different interests can be arbitrated and that synergy that emerges from co-creation of urban C sink parks between stakeholders (scientists, city officials, companies, and citizens) can result in demo areas with maximized potential for impact, dissemination and consideration of principles of scientific experimentation.
  • Kärenlampi, Lauri; Friedland, Andrew J. (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1988)
  • Garzon, Marta Benito; Robson, T. Matthew; Hampe, Arndt (2019)
    Improving our understanding of species ranges under rapid climate change requires application of our knowledge of the tolerance and adaptive capacity of populations to changing environmental conditions. Here, we describe an emerging modelling approach, Delta TraitSDM, which attempts to achieve this by explaining species distribution ranges based on phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation of fitness-related traits measured across large geographical gradients. The collection of intraspecific trait data measured in common gardens spanning broad environmental clines has promoted the development of these new models - first in trees but now rapidly expanding to other organisms. We review, explain and harmonize the main findings from this new generation of models that, by including trait variation over geographical scales, are able to provide new insights into future species ranges. Overall, Delta TraitSDM predictions generally deliver a less alarming message than previous models of species distribution under new climates, indicating that phenotypic plasticity should help, to a considerable degree, some plant populations to persist under climate change. The development of Delta TraitSDMs offers a new perspective to analyse intraspecific variation in single and multiple traits, with the rationale that trait (co)variation and consequently fitness can significantly change across geographical gradients and new climates.
  • Nylund, Markku; Nylund, Liisa; Kellomäki, Seppo; Haapanen, Antti (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1979)
  • Lyytimäki, Jari (Routledge, 2017)
    Routledge Handbook of Urban Forestry
    Ecosystem services provided by urban green areas have been recognised to an increasing degree following the turn of the millennium (MEA, 2003; Gómez-Baggethun and Barton, 2013). Urban trees in particular provide urban dwellers with a variety of ecosystem services (see Chapter 4 of this volume). However, urban trees are also the source of various types of harm, nuisance and costs. These ‘bad’ aspects may be labelled as ecosystem disservices. The concept of ecosystem disservice is a recent one and there is no widely agreed definition for it. On a general level, ecosystem disservices can be defined as the functions, processes and attributes generated by the ecosystem that result in perceived or actual negative impacts on human wellbeing (Shackleton et al., 2016). Both ecosystem services and disservices are inherently anthropogenic concepts, putting emphasis on the human valuation of ecosystem properties and functions. What is perceived as beautiful and beneficial by one person may be considered ugly, useless, unpleasant or unsafe by another. For example, biodiversity-rich, semi-natural areas inside city limits are often experienced as suffering from a lack of maintenance, as opposed to intensively maintained but biodiversity-poor urban parks.
  • Seppälä, Kustaa (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1972)
  • Kalela, Erkki K. (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1949)
  • Hänninen, Heikki; Pelkonen, Paavo (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1988)
  • Hänninen, Heikki (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1987)
  • Pitkänen, Timo P.; Sirro, Laura; Häme, Lauri; Häme, Tuomas; Törmä, Markus; Kangas, Annika (ScienceDirect, 2020)
    International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation 86 (2020)
    The majority of the boreal forests in Finland are regularly thinned or clear-cut, and these actions are regulated by the Forest Act. To generate a near-real time tool for monitoring management actions, an automatic change detection modelling chain was developed using Sentinel-2 satellite images. In this paper, we focus mainly on the error evaluation of this automatized workflow to understand and mitigate incorrect change detections. Validation material related to clear-cut, thinned and unchanged areas was collected by visual evaluation of VHR images, which provided a feasible and relatively accurate way of evaluating forest characteristics without a need for prohibitively expensive fieldwork. This validation data was then compared to model predictions classified in similar change categories. The results indicate that clear-cuts can be distinguished very reliably, but thinned stands exhibit more variation. For thinned stands, coverage of broadleaved trees and detections from certain single dates were found to correlate with the success of the modelling results. In our understanding, this relates mainly to image quality regarding haziness and translucent clouds. However, if the growing season is short and cloudiness frequent, there is a clear trade-off between the availability of good-quality images and their preferred annual span. Gaining optimal results therefore depends both on the targeted change types, and the requirements of the mapping frequency.
  • Rivers, Malin; Beech, Emily; Bazos, Ioannis; Bogunić, Faruk; Buira, Antoni; Caković, Danka; Carapeto, André; Carta, Angelino; Cornier, Bruno; Fenu, Giuseppe; Fernandes, Francisco; Fraga i Arguimbau, Pere; Garcia Murillo, Pablo; Lepší, Martin; Matevski, Vlado; Medina, Félix; Menezes de Sequeira, Miguel; Meyer, Norbert; Mikoláš, Vlastimil; Montagnani, Chiara; Monteiro-Henriques, Tiago; Naranjo Suárez, José; Orsenigo, Simone; Petrova, Antoaneta; Reyes-Betancort, Alfredo; Rich, Tim; Salvesen, Per Harald; Santana López, Isabel; Scholz, Stephan; Sennikov, Alexander; Shuka, Lulëzim; Silva, Luís Filipe; Thomas, Philip; Troia, Angelo; Villar, José Luis; Allen, David (International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), 2019)
    IUCN Red List of Threatened Species – Regional Assessment
    The European Red List is a review of the status of European species according to IUCN regional Red Listing guidelines. It identifies those species that are threatened with extinction at the regional level – in order that appropriate conservation action can be taken to improve their status. This publication summarises results for all Europe’s native species of tree (454 species), of which 265 species (over 58%) are endemic to continental Europe, with 56% (252 species) endemic to the 28 EU Member States. Of these, 168 (42%) of the species are threatened with extinction at the European level, however, for 57 species (nearly 13%) there was insufficient information to assign a conservation status, and are therefore classified as Data Deficient, and in need of further research. The main threat to tree species in Europe has been identified as invasive or problematic species, impacting 38% of tree species, followed by deforestation and wood harvesting, and urban development (both affecting 20% of tree species). For threatened species, livestock farming, land abandonment, changes in forest and woodland management, and other ecosystem modifications such as fire are the major threats, impacting the survival of trees.
  • Hänninen, Heikki; Pelkonen, Paavo (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1988)
  • Scholz, F. (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1981)
  • Weissenberg, Kim von (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1973)
  • Christersson, Lars; Fircks, Heinrich A. von (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1988)
  • Eriksson, J.; Bergholm, J.; Kvist, K. (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1981)
  • Sarvas, Jukka (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1977)