Browsing by Subject "triple-negative breast cancer"

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  • Kiiski, Johanna; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Freysteinsdottir, Edda S.; Reynisdottir, Inga; Hart, Steven N.; Shimelis, Hermela; Vilske, Sara; Kallioniemi, Anne; Schleutker, Johanna; Leminen, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Blomqvist, Carl; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Couch, Fergus J.; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli (2014)
  • Heuser, Vanina D.; Mansuri, Naziha; Mogg, Jasper; Kurki, Samu; Repo, Heli; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Carpen, Olli; Gardberg, Maria (2018)
    Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive form of breast cancer with limited treatment options. The subgroup can be identified immunohistochemically, by lack of hormone receptor expression combined with expression of basal markers such as CK5/6 and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In vitro, several regulators of the actin cytoskeleton are essential for efficient invasion of basal-like breast cancer cell lines. Whether these proteins are expressed in vivo determines the applicability of these findings in clinical settings. The actin-regulating formin protein FHOD1 participates in invasion of the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Here, we measure the expression of FHOD1 protein in clinical triple-negative breast cancers by using immunohistochemistry and further characterize the expression of another formin protein, INF2. We report that basal-like breast cancers frequently overexpress formin proteins FHOD1 and INF2. In cell studies using basal-like breast cancer cell lines, we show that knockdown of FHOD1 or INF2 interferes with very similar processes: maintenance of cell shape, migration, invasion, and proliferation. Inhibition of EGFR, PI3K, or mitogen-activated protein kinase activity does not alter the expression of FHOD1 and INF2 in these cell lines. We conclude that the experimental studies on these formins have implications in the clinical behavior of basal-like breast cancer.
  • Ji, Jianfeng; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hongbo; Liu, Fengyong; He, Jian; Li, Wanlin; Xie, Tingting; Zhong, Danni; Zhang, Tingting; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong; Almeida Santos, Helder; Zhou, Min (2018)
    Triple‐negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a kind of aggressive malignancy with fast metastatic behavior. Herein, a nanosystem loaded with a near‐infrared (NIR) agent is developed to achieve chemo‐photothermal combination therapy for inhibiting tumor growth and metastasis in TNBC. The NIR agent of ultrasmall sized copper sulfide nanodots with strong NIR light‐absorbing capability is entrapped into the doxorubicin‐contained temperature‐sensitive polymer‐based nanosystem by a self‐assembled method. The temperature sensitive nanoclusters (TSNCs) can significantly enhance the drug penetration depth and significantly kill the cancer cells under the near‐infrared laser irradiation. Importantly, it is plausible that the tumor penetrating nanosystem combined with NIR laser irradiation can prevent lung and liver metastasis via extermination of the cancer stem cells. The in vivo characteristics, evaluated by photoacoustic imaging, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution, confirm their feasibility for tumor treatment owing to their long blood circulation time and high tumor uptake. Thanks to the high tumor uptake and highly potent antitumor efficacy, the doxorubicin‐induced cardiotoxicity can be avoided when the TSNC is used. Taken together, it is believed that the nanosystem has excellent potential for clinical translation.
  • Savelius, Mariel (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    Breast cancer remains as the leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most aggressive breast cancer subtypes and lacks targetable receptors, consequently, cannot be treated with current hormone of anti-HER2 targeting therapies. Thus, there is a need for discovering novel and well-tolerated therapies. MYC is a proto-oncogene and a transcription factor, that is frequently amplified and overexpressed in breast cancers. MYC is involved in many cellular processes promoting cell proliferation, however, overexpression of MYC can also sensitize cells to replicative stress and apoptotic cell death. In our previous studies we have shown that pharmacological activation of AMPK, a cellular energy sensor, synergises with Bcl-2 family inhibitors, such as navitoclax and venetoclax, and activates MYC-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines, transgenic mouse models of MYC-dependent mammary tumorigenesis and in MYC-high patient-derived explant cultures (PDECs). In subsequent study we observed, that indirect AMPK activator metformin alone inhibited tumor growth in vivo, but did not induce apoptosis in mouse tumors or in PDECs. Metformin, a type II diabetes mellitus drug, has shown anti-cancer effects in some population studies and is under investigation for a cancer therapies, however the whole mechanism of action in cancer is still not well-known. To elucidate metformin’s effects on MYC overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells, I will present, that metformin has anti-proliferative effects and show that long term metformin treatment induces senescence biomarkers in MYC-high TNBC breast cancer cell lines. To study metformin's short and long-term anti-proliferative activity, cell proliferation during and after drug treatment was investigated, which showed, that metformin’s effects do not seem to persist long after drug withdrawal. In conclusion, the key observation of this thesis was, that metformin does inhibit the proliferation of MYC overexpressing cancer cells and presents a senescence phenotype that possibly can be exploited to find new targeted therapies for triple-negative breast cancer patients.
  • Schmidt, Marcus; Edlund, Karolina; Hengstler, Jan G.; Heimes, Anne-Sophie; Almstedt, Katrin; Lebrecht, Antje; Krajnak, Slavomir; Battista, Marco J.; Brenner, Walburgis; Hasenburg, Annette; Rahnenfuehrer, Joerg; Gehrmann, Mathias; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Wirtz, Ralph M.; Joensuu, Heikki (2021)
    Simple Summary We examined the relevance of immunoglobulin kappa C (IGKC), an important part of the humoral immune system, in early breast cancer. To our knowledge, our results confirm for the first time previous retrospective findings of a cancer recurrence protective role of IGKC in a large cohort of early breast cancer patients who were treated in the prospective, randomized FinHer clinical trial. We show that an increased amount of IGKC in the tumor is linked to longer distant metastasis-free survival, especially in patients whose breast cancer does not express hormone receptors or human epidermal growth factor receptor-2. This type of breast cancer often has poor prognosis. Since an improved outcome is associated with the presence of tumor-infiltrating IGKC expressing immune cells, this may be a further argument for the use of immunotherapies in these patients. We studied the prognostic impact of tumor immunoglobulin kappa C (IGKC) mRNA expression as a marker of the humoral immune system in the FinHer trial patient population, where 1010 patients with early breast cancer were randomly allocated to either docetaxel-containing or vinorelbine-containing adjuvant chemotherapy. HER2-positive patients were additionally allocated to either trastuzumab or no trastuzumab. Hormone receptor-positive patients received tamoxifen. IGKC was evaluated in 909 tumors using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the influence on distant disease-free survival (DDFS) was examined using univariable and multivariable Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier estimates. Interactions were analyzed using Cox regression. IGKC expression, included as continuous variable, was independently associated with DDFS in a multivariable analysis also including age, molecular subtype, grade, and pT and pN stage (HR 0.930, 95% CI 0.870-0.995, p = 0.034). An independent association with DDFS was also found in a subset analysis of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) (HR 0.843, 95% CI 0.724-0.983, p = 0.029), but not in luminal (HR 0.957, 95% CI 0.867-1.056, p = 0.383) or HER2-positive (HR 0.933, 95% CI 0.826-1.055, p = 0.271) cancers. No significant interaction between IGKC and chemotherapy or trastuzumab administration was detected (P-interaction = 0.855 and 0.684, respectively). These results show that humoral immunity beneficially influences the DDFS of patients with early TNBC.