Browsing by Subject "urban studies"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-6 of 6
  • Krivy, Maros (Helsingin yliopisto, 2012)
    The thesis analyses transformation of obsolete industrial space as a contested socio-spatial process of urban restructuring and examines the way 'culture' becomes a planning instrument of the transformation. The thesis studies social practices that have influenced the process and examines the main actors, conflicts, and perceptions of obsolete industrial space. The main argument is the following. Artistic practices challenged negative perceptions of obsolete industrial space and represented and practised it as a space of the everyday. The practices have recognized and defended obsolete space in its present reality of obsolescence and their success has influenced urban planning and policies. Artistic practices have been labelled as 'culture' and 'culture' has become a planning instrument of regenerating obsolete industrial spaces. Case studies of the Cable Factory and the Suvilahti in Helsinki and the influence of the former on the latter give empirical evidence to the argument. The main body of the thesis consists of four articles published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Drawing on discussions from critical economic geography, art history, and urban semiology, the first article analyses speculative redevelopment, conservation, and speculative conservation as ideal-typical practices of transforming obsolete industrial space. In these practices, obsolescence of industrial space is understood as a 'problem to be fixed'. The role of architecture as signifying a static notion of time is discussed. By representing architectural object as situated in the future or in the past, respectively, the analysed practices obscure social and political context of the architectural process. The second article presents a study of art works by Gordon Matta-Clark, Robert Smithson and Bernd and Hilla Becher and introduces the concept of negativity in industrial architecture. Rather than representing and practising obsolete industrial space as a 'problem to be fixed', these works acknowledge obsolete industrial space in its present reality of obsolescence. The notion of representing negativity in industrial space is theorized in contrast to representing obsolete space as 'negative'. The third article studies the Pro Kaapeli movement and its role in the transformation of the Cable Factory in Helsinki during the years 1989-1991. The conflict between the Helsinki city administration and the Pro Kaapeli is examined. Introducing the concept of empty space, the article studies how the Pro Kaapeli made use of the emptiness of obsolete industrial space. The Pro Kaapeli did not contest the perception of obsolete space as empty; rather, it contested the interpretation of emptiness as negative. The movement challenged the planned demolition and redevelopment of the factory by appealing to its emptiness, not to its use or function. For the Pro Kaapeli, the emptiness of space was not something to be 'fixed'. Empty space, in its emptiness, was accepted as the starting point in the spatial practice of continuous alterations. The fourth article is a case study of the ongoing transformation of Suvilahti in Helsinki. The transformation of the industrial premises of Suvilahti has been a planning project of the city of Helsinki and 'culture' has been the main instrument used. The article introduces the concepts of culture factory and cultural governmentality and examines the influence of the Cable Factory case on the planning of Suvilahti. The success of the Pro Kaapeli movement's defence of the Cable Factory contested negative perceptions of obsolete industrial spaces, but, unintentionally, it laid foundation for using 'culture' as an instrument of regenerating the obsolete spaces. Spontaneous practices of the Pro Kaapeli have been recognized as 'culture' and 'culture' has been employed as a planning instrument in the regeneration of the Suvilahti. The article discusses culture factory as a model of regenerated obsolete industrial space, which is the objective of planning in the Suvilahti. The planners encourage spontaneous 'cultural' practices for their perceived effects on regenerating obsolete industrial space. A form of planning practice that withdraws from planning the content of culture and instead plans or wishes for the social and urban effects of culture is conceptualized as cultural governmentality.
  • Lu, Chiyu (Helsingfors universitet, 2016)
    The thesis investigates what the classical book Rites of Zhou, the guiding book of construction and bureaucracy in the Western Zhou dynasty, wrote about cities. The topic is relevant because in understanding Chinese cities, there is a lack of attention on the richness of Chinese history and its own tradition in contrast to the rapid and massive urbanization phenomena seen in the country. The aim of the thesis is to understand the political considerations of cities in early China, specifically the literature rich Western Zhou dynasty which was considered as the paradigm for later regimes throughout China’s history. By studying the built environment and way of organization in the beginning of Western Zhou dynasty according to Rites of Zhou, the political traditions and roots of Chinese cities is to be explored. Above all, the cities in the Rites of Zhou are political entities, which were the centers of politics and device to implement king’s will, organizing and controlling the whole kingdom.
  • Harris, Hanna (2002)
    This study discusses the three waves of modern urbanization described as the Infrastructure City, the Spectacle City and the Process City. The aim is to see how we are now moving to the third wave of urbanization, herein referred to as the Process City, and what implications this has to urban studies and the production of urban culture. The study is an essay based on interviews of the key figures of the chosen examples and related literature. The aim is to create a dialogue between theory and selected examples, such as the Helsinki 2000 year of Culture, cafe9.net as one of its projects and other similar new spaces for culture that are meta-producers of hybrid cultural functions, in order to show that a third wave of urbanization, the Process City, has become characteristic of urban culture. The main focus is on showing how communities and networks operating in the everyday life have become important elements of urbanization, in addition to the previously acknowledged urban infrastructures and isolated, one-off urban events. This third wave of urbanization is examined through Edward Soja's (1996) model of three spatialities. An important theoretical starting point, also common to Soja's work, was the aim to pass beyond dualisms of micro and macro, modern and postmodern. Michel Maffesoli's (1985) notion of 'comprehensive sociology' was found useful for making this explicit. Another important theoretical consideration is that of discussing the similarities and differences between the notions of community and network. Further studies, beyond the scope of this one, are indicated 1) in the nature and extent of the individual practices and life styles operating within the studied spaces and networks, and 2) in the general emergence of the 'culture of the third'. Principle bibliography included: Castells, Manuel (1996). The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture. Volume I: The Rise of the Network Society. Oxford: Blackwell. Maffesoli, Michel (1985). La connaissance ordinaire. Précis de sociologie compréhensive. Paris: Librairie des Méridiens, Klincksieck & co. Soja, Edward W. (1996). Thirdspace. Journeys to Los Angeles and Other Real-and-Imagined Places. Oxford: Balckwell. URBS (2000). Kirja Helsingin kaupunkikulttuurista. Stadipiiri (eds.) Helsingin kaupungin tietokeskus. Helsinki: Edita.
  • Harris, Hanna (2002)
    his study discusses the three waves of modern urbanization described as the Infrastructure City, the Spectacle City and the Process City. The aim is to see how we are now moving to the third wave of urbanization, herein referred to as the Process City, and what implications this has to urban studies and the production of urban culture. The study is an essay based on interviews of the key figures of the chosen examples and related literature. The aim is to create a dialogue between theory and selected examples, such as the Helsinki 2000 year of Culture, cafe9.net as one of its projects and other similar new spaces for culture that are meta-producers of hybrid cultural functions, in order to show that a third wave of urbanization, the Process City, has become characteristic of urban culture. The main focus is on showing how communities and networks operating in the everyday life have become important elements of urbanization, in addition to the previously acknowledged urban infrastructures and isolated, one-off urban events. This third wave of urbanization is examined through Edward Soja's (1996) model of three spatialities. An important theoretical starting point, also common to Soja's work, was the aim to pass beyond dualisms of micro and macro, modern and postmodern. Michel Maffesoli's (1985) notion of 'comprehensive sociology' was found useful for making this explicit. Another important theoretical consideration is that of discussing the similarities and differences between the notions of community and network. Further studies, beyond the scope of this one, are indicated 1) in the nature and extent of the individual practices and life styles operating within the studied spaces and networks, and 2) in the general emergence of the 'culture of the third'. Principle bibliography: Castells, Manuel (1996). The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture. Volume I: The Rise of the Network Society. Oxford: Blackwell. Maffesoli, Michel (1985). La connaissance ordinaire. Précis de sociologie compréhensive. Paris: Librairie des Méridiens, Klincksieck & co. Soja, Edward W. (1996). Thirdspace. Journeys to Los Angeles and Other Real-and-Imagined Places. Oxford: Blackwell. URBS (2000). Kirja Helsingin kaupunkikulttuurista. Stadipiiri (eds.) Helsingin kaupungin tietokeskus. Helsinki: Edita.
  • Jauhola, Marjaana (Helsinki University Press, 2020)
    Pro et Contra
  • Klein, Johannes; Juhola, Sirkku (2018)
    This qualitative study examines how administrative traditions and governance in two cities, New York City and Helsinki, have affected the interplay of public administration, the private sector, and citizens in climate change adaptation. The results show that both cities aim for an increased state-market-civil society interaction. However, their efforts have different points of departure and follow different trajectories. New York City's administration is within the Anglo-American tradition of state-market dualism, while the state-market-civil society interaction for adaptation is coordinated by newly created administrative organizations. This interaction has to be accommodated to the strong reliance on market mechanisms. Helsinki's administration has its roots in the welfare state administration with a strong role of the public administration. Increased state-market-civil society interaction results in a reduced influence of the public sector and the reliance on ad hoc projects and informal modes of cross-sectoral cooperation.