Browsing by Subject "very low birth weight"

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  • Joensuu, Eveliina; Munck, Petriina; Setänen, Sirkku; Lipsanen, Jari; Huhtala, Mira; Lapinleimu, Helena; Stolt, Suvi K. J. (2021)
    Preterm children (born
  • Björkqvist, Johan; Kuula, Juho; Kuula, Liisa; Nurhonen, Markku; Hovi, Petteri; Räikkönen, Katri; Pesonen, Anu; Kajantie, Eero (2020)
    Chronotype is the temporal preference for activity and sleep during the 24 h day and is linked to mental and physical health, quality of life, and mortality. Later chronotypes, so-called “night owls”, consistently display poorer health outcomes than “larks”. Previous studies have suggested that preterm birth (<37 weeks of gestation) is associated with an earlier chronotype in children, adolescents, and young adults, but studies beyond this age are absent. Our aim was to determine if adults born preterm at very low birth weight (VLBW, ≤1500 g) display different chronotypes than their siblings. We studied VLBW adults, aged 29.9 years (SD 2.8), matched with same-sex term-born siblings as controls. A total of 123 participants, consisting of 53 sibling pairs and 17 unmatched participants, provided actigraphy-derived data on the timing, duration, and quality of sleep from 1640 nights (mean 13.3 per participant, SD 2.7). Mixed effects models provided estimates and significance tests. Compared to their siblings, VLBW adults displayed 27 min earlier sleep midpoint during free days (95% CI: 3 to 51 min, p =.029). This was also reflected in the timing of falling asleep, waking up, and sleep-debt corrected sleep midpoint. The findings were emphasized in VLBW participants born small for gestational age. VLBW adults displayed an earlier chronotype than their siblings still at age 30, which suggests that the earlier chronotype is an enduring individual trait not explained by shared family factors. This preference could provide protection from risks associated with preterm birth.
  • Robinson, Rachel; Lahti-Pulkkinen, Marius; Schnitzlein, Daniel; Voit, Falk; Girchenko, Polina; Wolke, Dieter; Lemola, Sakari; Kajantie, Eero; Heinonen, Kati; Räikkönen, Katri (2020)
    Preterm birth research is poised to explore the mental health of adults born very preterm(VP;1970) included VP/VLBW individuals with controls born at term(≥37+0 weeks) or with normal birth weight(NBW; ≥2500g). Thirteen studies were included. Studies consistently showed an increased risk for psychotropic medication use for VP/VLBW adults in comparison to NBW/term controls, but whether VP/VLBW adults have an increased risk for mental health disorders or symptoms appearing in adulthood remains uncertain. The quality of the evidence was moderate (65.8%) to high (34.2%). Further research in larger samples is needed.
  • Matinolli, Hanna-Maria; Hovi, Petteri; Levälahti, Esko; Kaseva, Nina; Silveira, Patricia P.; Hemiö, Katri; Järvenpää, Anna-Liisa; Eriksson, Johan G.; Andersson, Sture; Lindström, Jaana; Männistö, Satu; Kajantie, Eero (2017)
    Epidemiological studies and animal models suggest that early postnatal nutrition and growth can influence adult health. However, few human studies have objective recordings of early nutrient intake. We studied whether nutrient intake and growth during the first 9 weeks after preterm birth with very low birth weight (VLBW,
  • Uusitalo, Karoliina; Haataja, Leena; Nyman, Anna; Ripatti, Liisi; Huhtala, Mira; Rautava, Päivi; Lehtonen, Liisa; Parkkola, Riitta; Lahti, Katri; Koivisto, Mari; Setänen, Sirkku (2020)
    Objective To evaluate the rate of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and its correlation to cognition and self-experienced health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children born very preterm. Design Prospective follow-up study. Setting Regional population of children born very preterm in Turku University Hospital, Finland, in 2001-2006. Patients A total of 170 children born very preterm were followed up until 11 years of age. Main outcome measures Motor and cognitive outcomes were evaluated using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children -Second Edition (Movement ABC-2) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children -Fourth Edition, respectively, and HRQoL using the 17-Dimensional Illustrated Questionnaire (17D). The Touwen neurological examination was performed to exclude other neurological conditions affecting the motor outcome. Results Eighteen children born very preterm (17 boys) (11.3%) had DCD, defined as Movement ABC-2 total test score ≤5th percentile. A positive correlation between motor and cognitive outcome (r=0.22, p=0.006) was found. Children born very preterm with DCD had lower cognitive scores than those without DCD (Full-Scale IQ mean 76.8 vs 91.6, p=0.001). Moreover, children born very preterm with DCD reported lower HRQoL than children born very preterm without motor impairment (17D mean 0.93 vs 0.96, p=0.03). However, HRQoL was higher in this group of children born very preterm compared with population-based normative test results (p
  • Yokoyama, Yoshie; Pitkäniemi, Janne Mikael; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri (2012)
    We analyzed the characteristics associated with the growth in weight of Japanese triplets from birth to 12 years of age. The study included 376 mothers and their 1,128 triplet children, who were born between 1978 and 2006. Data were collected through a mailed questionnaire sent to the mothers asking for information recorded in medical records. For these births, data on triplets' weight growth, gestational age, sex, parity, maternal age at delivery, maternal height, and maternal body mass index were obtained from records in the Maternal and Child Health Handbooks and records in the school where children receive health check-ups. The weight deficit of the triplets compared to the general population of Japan remained between 10% and 17% until 12 years of age. Moreover, at 12 years of age, the differences of weight between the general population and triplets were approximately -4.75 kg for boys and -6.00 kg for girls. Very low birth weight had the strongest contribution to body weight until 8 years of age. After 8 years of age, maternal body mass index was a significant factor affecting the weight of triplets until 12 years of age.