Browsing by Subject "yield response"

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  • Soinne, Helena; Keskinen, Riikka; Räty, Mari; Kanerva, Sanna; Turtola, Eila; Kaseva, Janne; Nuutinen, Visa; Simojoki, Asko; Salo, Tapio (2021)
    To achieve appropriate yield levels, inherent nitrogen (N) supply and biological N fixation are often complemented by fertilization. To avoid economic losses and negative environmental impacts due to over-application of N fertilizer, estimation of the inherent N supply is critical. We aimed to identify the roles of soil texture and organic matter in N mineralization and yield levels attained in cereal cultivation with or without N fertilization in boreal mineral soils. First, the net N mineralization and soil respiration were measured by laboratory incubation with soil samples varying in clay and organic carbon (C) contents. Secondly, to estimate the inherent soil N supply under field conditions, both unfertilized and fertilized cereal yields were measured in fields on clay soils (clay 30-78%) and coarse-textured soils (clay 0-28%). In clay soils (C 2.5-9.0%), both the net N mineralization and the cereal yields (without and with fertilization) decreased with increasing clay/C ratio. Moreover, in soils with high clay/C ratio, the agronomic N use efficiency (additional yield per kg of fertilizer N) varied considerably, indicating the presence of growth limitations other than N. In coarse-textured soils, the yield increase attained by fertilization increased with increasing organic C. Our results indicate that for clay soils in a cool and humid climate, the higher the clay content, the more organic C is needed to produce reasonable yields and to ensure efficient use of added nutrients without high N losses to the environment. For coarse soils having a rather high mean organic C of 2.3%, the organic C appeared to improve agronomic N use efficiency. For farmers, simple indicators such as the clay/C ratio or the use of non-N-fertilized control plots may be useful for site-specific adjustment of the rates of N fertilization. Highlights We aimed to identify simple indicators of inherent soil N supply applicable at the farm level. In clay soils, the net N mineralization was found to correlate negatively with the clay/C ratio. In coarse-textured soils, agronomic N use efficiency improved with increasing soil organic C. Clay soils with high clay/C ratio are at risk of low yield levels.
  • Ohralahti, Kalle (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    Barley is the most cultivated cereal in acreage in Finland. Barley has many plant diseases that cause yield reductions like net blotch, scald and mildew. The weather conditions and the disease resistance of the cultivar are affecting the appearance of the plant diseases. Plant diseases can be controlled by certified seed, seed treatment, crop rotation, fungicide treatment and by cultivating resistant cultivars. Net blotch causes reduction in green leaf area, thousand grain weight and thereby it reduces yield. The aim of this study was to study what is the yield response of barley to fungicide treatment when cultivars are either susceptible or tolerant to net blotch. The data of this study was based on The profitability of plant protection -trial series. The field trials were conducted at three locations in Finland during 2006–2009. The cultivars in the trials were divided based on their net blotch resistance to susceptible and tolerant groups. Fungicide treatment was made with Acanto Prima as a single treatment at the flag leaf stage. Tolerant and susceptible groups differed significantly in the amount of the net blotch. Fungicide treatment decreased the appearance of net blotch more in the susceptible group although the amount of net blotch was significantly less in the tolerant group. In the tolerant group the disease level was low even before the fungicide treatment. The conclusions of this study were, that tolerant cultivar group had better yield, but susceptible cultivar group had better yield response to the fungicide treatment. The yield response was in average 400 kg/ha in the susceptible and about 200 kg/ha in the resistant cultivar group. The yield response was due to the higher thousand grain weight. The yield security of disease resistant cultivar is better also in higher disease pressure. Resistant cultivar is one way to reduce the usage of plant protection products in IPM farming. Breeding of resistant cultivars is needed because the plant diseases are altering in their disease infection capability.