Browsing by Subject "KOTA2019"

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  • Syrjälä, Henna; Norrgrann, Anu (Emerald, 2019)
    Purpose: This chapter examines two rather extreme examples of non-human entities in home assemblage, interior objects, and companion animals, and how their agency appears distributed with human consumers in assembling home. The authors aim at drawing conceptual contrasts and overlappings in how agency expresses itself in these categories of living and non-living entities, highlighting the multifaceted manifestations of object agency. Methodology/Approach: This chapter employs multiple sets of ethnographi-cally inspired data, ranging from ethnographic interviews and an autoethno-graphic diary to three types of (auto-)netnographic data. Findings: The findings showcase oscillation of agency between these three analytic categories (human, non-human living, and non-human non-living), focusing on how it is distributed between two of the entities at a time, within the heterogeneous assemblage of home. Furthermore, the findings show instances in which agency emerges as shared between all three entities. Originality/Value: The contribution of this chapter comes from advancing existing discussion on object agency toward the focus on distributed and shared agency. The research adds to the prevailing discussion by exhibiting how agency oscillates between different types of interacting entities in the assemblage, and in particular, how the two types of non-human entities are agentic. The research demonstrates the variability and interwovenness of non-human and human, living and non-living agency as they appear intertwined in home assemblage.
  • Björk, Bo-Christer (2019-07-30)
    The acceptance rate of scholarly journals is an important selection criterion for authors choosing where to submit their manuscripts. Unfortunately, information about the acceptance (or rejection rates) of individual journals is seldom avai- lable. This article surveys available systematic information and studies of acceptance rates. The overall global average is around 35-40%. There are significant differences between fields of science, with biomedicine having higher acceptance rates compared to for instance the social sciences. Open access journals usually have higher acceptance rates than subs- cription journals, and this is particularly true for so-called OA mega-journals, which have peer review criteria focusing on sound science only.
  • Fougère, Martin; Solitander, Nikodemus; Maheshwari, Sanchi (2019-11-28)
    Through its focus on deep and experiential learning, service-learning (SL) has become increasingly popular within the business school curriculum. While a reciprocal dimension has been foundational to SL, the reciprocality that is emphasized in business ethics literature is often on the relationship between the service experience and the academic content, rather than reciprocal learning of the service providers (students) and the recipients (organizations and their managers), let alone other stakeholders. Drawing on the notion of enriched reciprocal learning and on Aristotle’s typology of modes of knowing, we (1) revisit reciprocal learning by illustrating what kinds of learning occur for server and served in four SL projects from a project course in CSR, and (2) emphasize the role of boundary spanners from the project organizations in making this reciprocal learning happen and translating the various types of student learning in ways that are useful for their organizations. We find that when boundary spanners are particularly engaged at making the projects impactful, they contribute to making the learning experiences of students, managers (including themselves) and sometimes other stakeholders useful, multidimensional, and ultimately rewarding.
  • Einarsen, Kari; Salin, Denise; Einarsen, Ståle Valvatne; Skogstad, Anders; Mykletun, Reidar Johan (2019-04-01)
    Purpose Drawing on the resource-based view, the purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which the level of the organization’s human resource management (HRM) practices, perceived financial resources and organizational size predict the existence of a well-developed ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying. Design/methodology/approach The human resource (HR) managers or the main health and safety representatives (HSRs) in 216 Norwegian municipalities responded to an electronic survey, representing some 50 percent of the municipalities. Findings The level of high-quality HRM practice predicted the existence of an ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying, particularly informal systems represented by a strong conflict management climate. Perceived financial resources did not predict the existence of such ethical infrastructure. Organizational size predicted the existence of policies and having training against bullying. Practical implications This study informs practitioners about organizational resources associated with organization having a well-developed ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying. A high level of high-quality HRM practices seems to be more important for the existence of a well-developed ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying compared to financial resources and organizational size, at least as perceived by HR managers and HSRs. Originality/value This study provides empirical evidence for the importance of having a high level of high-quality HRM practices as predictors of the existence of ethical infrastructure to tackle workplace bullying. An essential finding is that the existence of such an infrastructure is not dependent on distal resources, such as organizational size and perceived financial resources.
  • Grönroos, Christian (Sage publications, 2019)
    Relationship marketing (RM) has become a prevalent approach to marketing. According to the Nordic School of marketing thought, RM cannot be undertaken within a conventional marketing framework. RM has to break traditional marketing borders and permeate large parts of the organization. It cannot be managed by a separate marketing department. It is a larger thinking that requires cross-functional support within the organization. Based on the promise theory and related management approach, an RM grid, which enables the analysis of a firm's readiness for RM, is developed. It is argued that we need to analyse a firm's readiness for RM by addressing two important questions: 'Does the firm know its customers' processes as well as its own processes?' and '"Does the firm understand what its customers' consider good quality versus what's their own perspective of the quality of its offerings?'
  • Kouhizadeh, Mahtab; Sarkis, Joseph; Zhu, Qingyun (2019-04-25)
    The circular economy (CE) is an emergent concept to rethink and redesign how our economy works. The concept recognizes effective and efficient economic functioning at multiple scales-governments and individuals, globally and locally; for businesses, large and small. CE represents a systemic shift that builds long-term resilience at multiple levels (macro, meso and micro); generating new business and economic opportunities while providing environmental and societal benefits. Blockchain, an emergent and critical technology, is introduced to the circular economy environment as a potential enabler for many circular economic principles. Blockchain technology supported information systems can improve circular economy performance at multiple levels. Product deletion, a neglected but critical effort in product management and product portfolio management, is utilized as an illustrative business scenario as to blockchain's application in a circular economy research context. Product deletion, unlike product proliferation, has received minimal attention from both academics and practitioners. Product deletion decisions need to be evaluated and analyzed in the circular economy context. CE helps address risk aversion issues in product deletions such as inventory, waste and information management. This paper is the first to conceptualize the relationships amongst blockchain technology, product deletion and the circular economy. Many nuances of relationships are introduced in this study. Future evaluation and critical reflections are also presented with a need for a rigorous and robust research agenda to evaluate the multiple and complex relationships and interplay amongst technology, policy, commerce and the natural environment.
  • Ittonen, Kim; Myllymäki, Emma-Riikka; Tronnes, Per Christen (2019-07-01)
    Purpose This paper focuses on bankaudit committees and examines whether audit committee members who are formerauditors are associated with the acquisition of audit and non-audit servicesfrom their former employers.   Design/methodology/approach The study empirically examinesa sample of large banks that are included in the S&P Composite 1500.   Findings The paper reportssignificantly lower audit fees and a higher proportion of non-audit fees tototal fees when the audit committee chair is an alumnus of the incumbent auditfirm. Moreover, additional analysis reveals that these findings are strongerfor banks with more earnings management.   Researchlimitations/implications Overall, the findings indicatethat audit firms might consider banks using their alumni as audit committeechairs to be less risky or easier to audit, thus requiring relatively lesseffort from the auditors. The reduced effort required to audit clients withaudit firm alumni on their audit committees then has the effect of reducing theaudit fees charged. Alternatively, their auditing experience and cognitiveproximity might influence the assessment of the need for auditing or theability to negotiate lower audit fees on the part of audit firm alumni.   Originality/value This paper provides empiricalevidence of the association between audit firm alumni in influential positionson an audit committee and fees paid to those audit firms in the bankingindustry. The findings contribute to the literature by suggesting that bankswith affiliated former auditors chairing their audit committees not only havesignificantly lower audit fees but also a higher proportion is spent onnon-audit services.
  • Caic, Martina; Holmlid, Stefan; Mahr, Dominik; Odekerken-Schröder, Gaby (2019-12-31)
    In design for service, understanding the social fabric of the service system demands special focus, because the networks of actors that collaboratively create value strongly affect the multitude of service values for the beneficiaries of the system. This article explores mental models of actor networks from the phenomenological perspective of the beneficiaries, who ultimately determine the value of the service. The authors argue for a visual phenomenology and leverage the resourcefulness of individual network actors through a qualitative interpretive study that relies on in-depth interviews supported by generative card activities. By asking service beneficiaries (in this case, the elderly) to map their care-based network contexts, this method encourages human-centered, participatory approaches that reveal service systems from beneficiaries’ perspectives. With an analysis of constructed visual artefacts and data-rich narratives that uncover the instrumentality of visualizations, the authors further identify different types of networks and the dominant values held by each network’s focal actors. The authors hence suggest that not only should value creation as such be viewed as idiosyncratic, but so should the networks of actors that co-create value. Finally, the concept of service resonance is suggested to aid in accounting for the pluralistic perspectives of the network actors.
  • Peltola, Katja; Fröjdman, Isabella (2019-04-16)
    I dag är det nästan omöjligt att prata om språkundervisning utan att nämna digitalisering. Nätet är fullt av olika språkkurser och det finns massor av applikationer som man kan använda som hjälp när man vill lära sig ett nytt språk. Under läsåren 2016–2018 deltog vi i ett nordiskt projekt där vi testade hur en nätkurs fungerar som undervisningsmaterial på en klassrumskurs i nybörjarsvenska på universitetsnivån.
  • Ehrnström-Fuentes, Maria; Leipämaa-Leskinen, Hanna (2019-07-31)
    Self-organization is a term that is increasingly used to describe how engaged citizens come together to create sustainable food systems at the local community level. Yet, there is a lack of understanding of what this self-organizing activity actually means. While previous literature has addressed self-organization as an outcome of building consensus and a collective intentionality shared by the members of a group, we focus on the complex social processes involved when people with a diverse set of interests and motivations interact in the food network. In this study, we analyze what kinds of boundary negotiations emerge when grassroots-led food networks scale up. Our embedded single case study focuses on a REKO (‘REjäl KOnsumtion’, meaning ‘fair consumption’ in English) network in Finland comprising distributed local food groups and three types of actors: consumers, producers, and local administrators. We examine a conflict that arose within the REKO network in May–June 2016 when a small group of actors demanded that all local groups should implement similar rules, principles, and ethical standards. Our findings illustrate how moral, geographic, market, and power boundaries emerge in a self-organized grassroots-led food network. We further explicate the challenges that may appear within a self-organized grassroots-led food network, as it grows in scale and scope.
  • Wies, Simone; Hoffmann, Arvid Oskar Ivar; Aspara, Jaakko; Pennings, Joost M.E. (2019-05-02)
    Shareholder complaints put pressure on publicly listed firms, yet firms rarely directly address the actual issues raised in these complaints. The authors examine whether firms respond in an alternative way by altering advertising investments in an effort to ward off the financial damage associated with shareholder complaints. By analyzing a unique data set of shareholder complaints submitted to S&P 1500 firms between 2001 and 2016, supplemented with qualitative interviews of executives of publicly listed firms, the authors document that firms increase advertising investments following shareholder complaints and that such an advertising investment response mitigates a postcomplaint decline in firm value. Furthermore, results suggest that firms are more likely to increase advertising investments when shareholder complaints are submitted by institutional investors, pertain to nonfinancial concerns, and relate to topics that receive high media attention. The findings provide new insights on how firms address stock market adversities with advertising investments and inform managers about the effectiveness of such a response.
  • Annala, Linda; Polsa, Pia; Kovacs, Gyöngyi (2019-05-07)
    Purpose The institutional logic in developing countries is changing from aid toward trade, having implications for institutionally embedded supply chains (SCs) and their members. The purpose of this study is to investigate the transition from aid toward trade through a theoretical lens of institutional logics and the implications of changing logics for SC members and designs. Design/methodology/approach This is a large-scale qualitative study of the SCs of maintenance and repair operations (MRO) of water points. Empirical data were collected via 53 semi-structured interviews, observations, including photographs, and field notes from several echelons of MRO SCs in ten different Ethiopian districts. Findings In spite of the same underlying tenet of a unidirectional trajectory toward a business logic, the study shows that the co-existence or constellation of different institutional logics resulted in diverse practices that impacted SC design. Research limitations/implications The research was carried out in the MRO SC at a time of changing institutional logics, thereby being able to study their transition or constellation of logics. Practical implications The research has implications for policymakers and development practitioners: when designing and implementing rural water supply programs, the presence of co-existing logics and the lack of uniform SC designs should not be viewed as a hindrance. In fact, the study showed how constellations of logics can provide ways through which water points continue functioning and providing clean drinking water to the communities. Originality/value Few studies so far have focused on institutional logics and their implications for SC design.
  • Liljeblom, Eva; Maury, Benjamin; Hörhammer, Alexander (2019-07-30)
    Purpose – State ownership has been common especially in industries with restricted competition. In Russia, state controlled firms represent around 41% of the market value of all listed firms (Deloitte, 2015). Yet, there is a significant gap in the literature regarding the effects of various forms of government control in listed firms. The purpose of this study is to fill this gap by exploring the impact of the complexity of state ownership and competition on the performance of Russian listed firms. Design/methodology/approach – The sample consists of data for 72 firms (360 firm-years) in the Russian MOEX broad market index during 2011-2015. The complexity of state ownership is captured by studying forms of state control including majority/minority, direct/indirect, federal/regional, mixed structures, and golden shares. Findings – We find significant differences in performance relating to different forms of state ownership. State control is negatively related to firm valuation and the sales/employees ratio. Performance is weakest when state ownership takes the form minority, regional, or direct ownership. State control through golden shares typically outperforms other state controlled firms. We find indications of employment prioritization beyond the economical optimum. In addition, the relation between state ownership and profitability becomes positive in sectors where state firms appear to enjoy lower competition. Originality/value – While the effects of state ownership have been studied on many markets, there is a lack of studies on the effects of different forms, or the complexity, of state ownership beyond direct and indirect ownership. We contribute to the literature on the performance effects of state ownership by studying a multitude of forms of governmental ownership as well as the role of competition in Russia. Especially the profitability of state controlled firms is significantly affected by industry characteristics. Implications of the results are discussed both from firm and policy maker perspectives.
  • Ehrnström-Fuentes, Maria (2019-08-23)
    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the politics involved in local struggles against forestry extractivism. The forestry sector is dependent on vast areas of land for tree plantations. This creates deep-rooted conflicts between global corporations that seek access to natural resources and locals whose way of life requires the use of the same land. Design/methodology/approach: This study draws on a political ontology frame of reference and storytelling methodology to build on testimonies of three small-scale farmers who actively seek to resist forestry plantations next to their land in rural Uruguay. The stories reveal the impossibilities they face when raising claims in the public political sphere and how they lack the means to organise strong collective resistance. Findings: One of the testimonies reveals how the farmers engage in a form of “politics of place” (Escobar, 2001, 2008) to counter the power of the proponents of forestry and the further expansion of plantations. This form of politics strengthens and politicises the ontological difference between extractive and non-extractive worlds. The farmers seek to build new imaginations of rural living and sustainable futures without the presence of extractive corporations. They fulfil this aim by designing community projects that aim to revitalise ancient indigenous legends, set up agro-ecological farms, and teach schoolchildren about the environment. Originality/value: The struggles of the farmers indicate the territorial transformations involved in (un)making (non)extractive places and the need to expand the analysis of the politics involved in struggles against extractivism beyond social struggles.
  • Kallio, Markku; Halme, Merja; Aspara, Jaakko (2019-07-25)
    It has been established that consumers are often loss averse in the sense that perceived value decreases to a greater extent as a result of a price increase than what it increases as a result of an equal price decrease. We examine a previously scarcely studied question: how is the change in a product’s perceived value following a price change reflected in the product’s market demand? To complement the notion of loss averse (vs. gain seeking) price behaviour in perceived value, we provide a definition for loss averse (vs. gain seeking) price behaviour in demand. We discover that loss aversion in value does not necessarily lead to loss averse market demand, but can also lead to market demand being gain-seeking. We examine the boundary conditions for loss averse vs. gain seeking demand. Assuming that consumer preferences are given by a random utility model and the choice model is McFadden’s conditional logit, we develop a simple formula to check the character of the price behaviour. This provides novel insights by revealing an unexpected key determinant: the market share of the product under consideration. Finally, we consider the optimal price changes and what kind of consumer behaviour in demand they are related to.
  • Grange, Ray; Heaslip, Graham; McMullan, Caroline (2019-12-04)
    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify how coordination has evolved in humanitarian logistics, what were the triggers for change, and how have they been facilitated. Design: Systematic literature review of academic journals. Findings: This is the first paper to discuss the concepts of network orchestration and choreography in a humanitarian context. The research revealed that network coordination has moved on in the commercial sector to include orchestration and now, choreography concepts which have not been tested in HL literature. This reveals a lag exists between HL research and practice. Research limitations/implications: This paper represents an exploratory study and provides the basis for further research on the concepts of orchestration and choreography in humanitarian logistics. The paper sets a research agenda for academics. Practical implications: This paper is the first to discuss the concepts of network orchestration and choreography in a humanitarian context. Originality/value: The areas of orchestration and choreography have received limited consideration within the humanitarian aid logistics literature to date. This paper is designed to redress this shortfall. As a result, it is hoped that it will act as a catalyst for further research and to widen and deepen the resultant debate with a view to improving the outcome for those affected by current and future disasters.
  • Larson, Paul D. (2019-12-19)
    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop and test theory-driven hypotheses on the influence of corruption and gender inequality on logistics performance. Design/methodology/approach – This paper develops hypotheses based on a review of the literature and theory linking corruption, gender inequality and logistics performance. Testing the hypotheses draws on the following secondary data sources: the World Bank Logistics Performance Index, Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index and the United Nations Development Programme Gender Inequality Index. Regression analysis is used to test the hypotheses. Findings – A significant direct effect is evident between corruption perceptions and perceived logistics performance. Corruption is detrimental to logistics. Further, there is evidence of an indirect effect, via gender inequality. Gender inequality is also linked directly to lower logistics performance. Gross domestic product/ capita enters the analysis as a control variable. Research limitations/implications – While the analysis uses secondary data, sources are credible and their methods – while not perfect – are logical and appear to be reasonable. It is possible that excluded variables could further explain the relationships under study. This implies future research opportunities, perhaps involving case studies of specific nations. Practical implications – The results should inspire businesses, non-governmental organizations and governments to invest in, aid, advocate for and legislate toward greater gender equality – and against corruption. Logistics educators have an important role in disseminating this message. Social implications – Gender inequality and corruption are current, global social issues. Moving forward toward equality and away from corruption are the right moves. Such moves appear to also yield better logistics. Originality/value – This paper is among the first linking corruption and gender inequality to logistics performance. It shows how social issues impact logistics performance at a national level.
  • Murtonen, Mari; Laato, Samuli; Lipponen, Emilia; Salmento, Heidi; Vilppu, Henna; Maikkola, Merja; Vaskuri, Paula; Mäkinen, Martti; Naukkarinen, Johanna; Virkki-Hatakka, Terhi; Pajarre, Eila; Selänne, Sara; Skaniakos, Terhi (2019-12-31)
    This article analyses the design, implementation, and evaluation of a nation-wide project to create a common digital solution for university teaching staff’s pedagogical training in Finland. During three years, eight universities collaborated in developing an online learning platform called UNIPS, the University Pedagogical Support system. The areas to develop were A) a learning platform based on technical design principles, B) pedagogical principles, and C) broadening the scope of offered studies. The results have been promising. With a carefully planned timetable, all participating universities were able to produce, test, and offer UNIPS modules in collaboration with other universities on the area of their expertise. This paper presents the design process and looks at both developers' experiences on how they perceived the process and the UNIPS platform as its result, and students’ experiences about studying in the UNIPS platform.
  • Aminoff, Anna; Kovacs, Gyöngyi (2019-10-10)
  • Boly, Amadou; Gillanders, Robert; Miettinen, Topi (2019-06)
    In our framed laboratory experiment, two Public Officials, A and B, make consecutive decisions regarding embezzlement from separate funds. Official B observes Official A’s decisions before making his/her own. We find a contagion effect of embezzlement in that facing a corrupt official A increases the likelihood of embezzlement by Official B. Likewise, deterrence matters in that higher detection probabilities significantly decrease the likelihood of embezzlement. Crucially, when the same deterrence policy applies to both officials, detection is more effective in curbing embezzlement if chosen by an honest public official A rather than a corrupt public official A. This legitimacy effect may help explain why anti-corruption policies can fail in countries where the government itself is believed (or known) to be corrupt.