Browsing by Subject "gender"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-20 of 30
  • Segercrantz, Beata (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2011-04-15)
    Many Finnish IT companies have gone through numerous organizational changes over the past decades. This book draws attention to how stability may be central to software product development experts and IT workers more generally, who continuously have to cope with such change in their workplaces. It does so by analyzing and theorizing change and stability as intertwined and co-existent, thus throwing light on how it is possible that, for example, even if ‘the walls fall down the blokes just code’ and maintain a sense of stability in their daily work. Rather than reproducing the picture of software product development as exciting cutting edge activities and organizational change as dramatic episodes, the study takes the reader beyond the myths surrounding these phenomena to the mundane practices, routines and organizings in product development during organizational change. An analysis of these ordinary practices offers insights into how software product development experts actively engage in constructing stability during organizational change through a variety of practices, including solidarity, homosociality, close relations to products, instrumental or functional views on products, preoccupations with certain tasks and humble obedience. Consequently, the study shows that it may be more appropriate to talk about varieties of stability, characterized by a multitude of practices of stabilizing rather than states of stagnation. Looking at different practices of stability in depth shows the creation of software as an arena for micro-politics, power relations and increasing pressures for order and formalization. The thesis gives particular attention to power relations and processes of positioning following organizational change: how social actors come to understand themselves in the context of ongoing organizational change, how they comply with and/or contest dominant meanings, how they identify and dis-identify with formalization, and how power relations often are reproduced despite dis-identification. Related to processes of positioning, the reader is also given a glimpse into what being at work in a male-dominated and relatively homogeneous work environment looks like. It shows how the strong presence of men or “blokes” of a particular age and education seems to become invisible in workplace talk that appears ‘non-conscious’ of gender.
  • Hearn, Jeff (Ministry of Social Affairs, Tallinn, Estonia, 2020-10)
    Rapporteur Conference Report of 5th International Conference on Men and Equal Opportunities
  • Wesemann, Henrik; Wincent, Joakim (2021-03-23)
    Female entrepreneurs are subjected to stereotypes that make it difficult to secure funding. Crowdfunding challenges many of the causes of this discrimination but we know little about if and how it changes optimal funding strategies for female entrepreneurs. Using a sample of 3191 crowdfunding campaigns by female entrepreneurs, we draw from signaling theory to develop and test a series of counterintuitive conjectures for female crowdfunding success. Our results contradict advice that may be derived from traditional entrepreneurial finance: women in crowdfunding should use their gender as advertising, use more female-centric language, avoid self-promotion, start businesses in male-dominated sectors, and ask for more money. These findings highlight new theoretical mechanisms in crowdfunding and develop recommendations for female entrepreneurs who want to raise funds.
  • Kiriakos, Carol Marie; Tienari, Janne (2018-07-01)
    Writing is presented in hegemonic academic discourse as a rational and predictable activity that targets publications in the right journals. Nevertheless, many academics struggle with writing. In this article, we draw attention to how writing is experienced as an embodied, sensuous, emotional, social, and identity-related activity. Specifically, we aim to advance this comprehensive understanding of academic writing with the concept of love. By understanding love as action rather than feeling, we can foster our love for writing both as practice and in practice. We can learn to deal with the struggle by writing every day and approaching writing with dedication. By advocating the perspective of love, we seek to encourage discussion on academic writing so that it reflects the multifaceted experiences of writers, and unleash its potential in confusing and disrupting the masculine order in academia. Love offers a language to talk about vulnerability and courage, and viewing writing in the light of love helps us to learn more about ourselves and our activities as writers of management.
  • Hearn, Jeff (De Gruyter Oldenbourg, 2020)
    This afterword examines and reflects on the collection – with some chapters more in essay form, some empirical research studies – arising directly from the two-day Conference: “Making it like a man – Men, masculinities and the modern‘career’”, held at the Collegium for Advanced Studies at the University of Helsinki, 25–26 October 2018.
  • Hearn, Jeff (2020)
    When reflecting on the ten-year long series of one-day conferences that this special issue centres around, Maskulinitet i förändring [Masculinity in change] organised by Länsstyrelsen i Örebro län [county], beginning in 2010, I kept coming back to several questions: is this a unique phenomenon and achievement? How do we explain it? What are we to make of it? In this article, I go through ten reflections responding to, if not answering, these questions.
  • Pajumets, Marion; Hearn, Jeff (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)
    Is ecological sensitivity sufficient for revolutionising gender relations? Are eco-communities sites from where new masculinities can arise that are truly caring towards nature as well as women, other men and further genders? Could eco-villages be hatcheries of “ecological masculinity”? We present Estonian men eco-communards’ “gender-neutral holistic worldview” comprising discourses of “ecology”, “sustainable economy”, “re-establishing community”, and “spirituality” as an exemplary case for studying doing gender by not doing gender deliberately or explicitly. Analysis of open-ended interviews with eco-communard men, and the articles they published in Estonian media identifies the presence of, and negotiations between, varied masculine subject positions in talking of their green worldview. Thus, gender may be implicitly constructed as an undercurrent of “other” pursuits that are presented as having little or nothing to do with gender power relations. Practices, interactions and identities are rarely gender-neutral, despite some perceptions and appearances to the contrary. This approach examining the multiple masculinity/ies within a “gender-neutral” material-discursive field also has further relevance for discerning the implicit maintenance of social divisions and power relations in other contexts.
  • Hearn, Jeff; Strid, Sofia; Humbert, Anne Laure; Balkmar, Dag; Delaunay, Marine (2020-09-08)
    What happens when we focus primarily on violence as a central question—either within the gender regime approach or by making violence regime an approach in itself? The article first interrogates gender regimes theoretically and empirically through a focus on violence, and then develops violence regimes as a fruitful approach, conceptualizing violence as inequality in its own right, and a means to deepen the analysis of gender relations, gender domination, and policy. The article is a contribution to ongoing debate, which specifically and critically engages with the gender regime framework.
  • Pietiläinen, Tarja (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2001)
    In this working paper I discuss gendered entrepreneurship by exploring how the media writes about female entrepreneurship. The starting point is that the media when talking and writing about female entrepreneurs and female entrepreneurship, mould meanings of gender in entrepreneurship. I view entrepreneurship and gender as socially constructed, discursive phenomena. To uncover the processes of constructing gender in female entrepreneurship this paper applies a discursive framework, which treats language as a representational system producing and circulating meaning. The focus on language use as action implies that practises of writing and talking about female entrepreneurship ‘make’ gender as much as the women entrepreneurs) themselves: both involve working on culturally shared meanings to make reality intelligible. The data consists of articles published in Yrittäjä, a pro-SME magazine, in 1990-1997. In the analysis I show how gender is constructed in media talk. as a women’s issue Women entrepreneurs are constantly compared with men and with an implicitly masculine ideal of entrepreneurship and with strengths and weaknesses of women are displayed pointing out that the meaning making of gender taking place in the data refers to equality discourse. Finally I discuss possible consequences of the hegemonic equality discourse and suggest lines of further research.
  • Tienari, Janne; Søderberg, Anne-Marie; Holgersson, Charlotte; Vaara, Eero (Gender, Work and Organization. Vol. 12 No. 3 May 2005, 2005-05-03)
    In this article we explore ways in which vertical gender inequality is accomplished in discourse in the context of a recent chain of cross-border mergers and acquisitions that resulted in the formation of a multinational Nordic company. We analyse social interactions of ‘doing’ gender in interviews with male senior executives from Denmark, Finland and Sweden. We argue that their explanations for the absence of women in the top echelons of the company serve to distance vertical gender inequality. The main contribution of the article is an analysis of how national identities are discursively (re)constructed in such distancing. New insights are offered to studying gender in multinationals with a cross-cultural team of researchers. Our study sheds light on how gender intersects with nationality in shaping the multinational organization and the identities of male executives in globalizing business.
  • Hearn, Jeff; Kovalainen, Anne; Tallberg, Teemu (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2002-10-25)
    The expansion of transnational corporations is a fundamental part of contemporary globalising processes. Through their activities, transnational corporations also have impacts on national and cultural gender relations, thus highlighting that gender relations are indeed amenable, to some extent, to social change. Accordingly, large transnational corporations have many effects and implications for gender relations in society, as well as having their own gender relations within them, characteristically in the form of men’s far greater presence in management than women’s. A key aspect in the functioning of transnational corporations is thus the way they organise and restructure gender relations within their own activities. The research presented here on gender divisions and gender policies in largest Finnish multinational and national corporations is part of a longer-term examination of the relations of gender relations in transnational corporations. It sets out the results of a survey of the largest 100 Finnish corporations with regard to the following main kinds of question: · general information on the corporation’s size, sector and economic activities; · the gender composition of their employment, middle management, top management, and board; · their gender equality plans and related policies. The human resources manager or their equivalent or delegate of 62 corporations responded to the survey. The general analysis of the data obtained from the survey is presented in this research report. Special attention is given to relations between the gender divisions and the gender policies of corporations. Interpretations of the data and more general theoretical implications are discussed in the report, with special attention to theoretical ways forward.
  • Rosander, Michael; Salin, Denise; Viita, Lina; Blomberg, Stefan (2020-10-06)
    The aim of this study was to examine the role of gender in the process of workplace bullying. In particular, we examined how gender affects reported prevalence rates and health consequences of bullying. In addition, we pay particular attention to if the measurement method – self-labelling or behavioural experience methods – affects potential gender differences. A longitudinal study, with two measurement points 18 months apart, was conducted in Sweden (n = 1854 at T1; n = 1096 at T2). It was a probability sample out of a population of all 3.3 million people in Sweden working at workplaces with ten or more employees. The results showed a slightly higher tendency for women to self-label as bullied (8% vs. 6%), while a higher proportion of men than women could be labelled as bullied based on the negative acts they had been exposed to (21% vs. 14%). Exposure to negative acts was associated with more subsequent mental health problems for both men and women, whereas self-labelling was associated with mental health problems for men only. Mental health problems at baseline also increased the risk of bullying for both men and women; however, the measurement method affected if the effect was stronger for men or women. Overall, the study advances our understanding of the role of gender in bullying, in particular highlighting the importance of the measurement method for understanding such gender differences.
  • Husu, Liisa; Hearn, Jeff; Lämsä, Anna-Maija; Vanhala, Sinikka (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2010-12-15)
    Leadership and management remain highly gendered. Recent decades have seen a major international growth of studies on gender relations in leadership, organisations and management, in both empirical research and theoretical analysis. The differential relations of women and men to leadership and management are a key question for both theory and practice. Recent research and discussion on the gendering of leadership have been influenced by and have addressed: feminism; recognition of women and women’s situations, experiences and voices in leadership; organisational culture; communication; divisions of labour, hierarchy, power and authority; imagery and symbolism; information technology; sexuality, harassment, bullying and violence in organisations; home-work relations; men and masculinities in leadership; globalisation, transnationalism, intersectionality and post¬¬colonialism – amongst other issues. Having said that, the vast majority of mainstream work on leadership retains little or no gender analysis. In most business schools and other universities the position of gender-explicit work on leadership is still not well established. Leadership through the Gender Lens brings together critical analyses and debates on gender, leadership and management with contributions from 13 countries and five continents. How leadership and management are gendered can mean more gender equal or more gender unequal conditions for women and men. This includes how education and training can contribute to gendered leadership and management. The volume is organised in three main sections, on: careers and leadership; management, hierarchy and leadership: and interventions in leadership.
  • Hearn, Jeff; Piekkari, Rebecca; Jyrkinen, Marjut (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2009-12-02)
    Mainstream research on management generally continues to ignore gender relations. Even so, over recent years there has been a major growth of international research on gender relations in organizations. Yet, most of this has focused on gender relations in lower or middle levels rather than at the apex of the organization. This book draws on research on gender policies, structures and practices of management in large Finnish corporations. It builds on earlier survey work of gender policies in the 100 largest corporations in Finland, to examine, through qualitative interviews, more detailed gendered processes in seven selected corporations. These represent corporations that are ‘relatively active’, ‘moderately active’, and ‘not active’ in relation to gender equality. Key issues include contrasts between formal policies and organizational practices; different corporate contexts and individual managers’ views; definition and scope of gender policy; and the relation of gender policies and diversity policy. This focus on gender policies is understood and located within organizational structures, most obviously gendered corporate hierarchies. Important structures include national context in relation to transnationalization, relations of headquarters and subsidiaries, and interrelations of management, policy development and policy implementation. Gender relations in practice and gender practices are considered in more detail. These women and men managers operate at the intersections of gendered transnational managerial work, careers and family-type relations, including marriage and children, or lack thereof. Women and men managers may be part of the same management levels or management teams, but have totally different family-type situations and gendered experiences. Interconnections of management, domestic life and transnationalizations are intensely gendered matters. The debate on the public/private continues to be important for both gender relations and organizational relations, but complicated through transnationalizations. The modern transnational corporation is considered in terms of gender divisions and gender power, with particular reference to top management. The concluding discussion notes implications for research and policy.
  • Niemi, Hertta (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2010-11-10)
    Parliaments are political institutions, but they are also places where people work; the MPs and the people who are employed there work, albeit in rather different ways. In this research the focus is on those in a Parliament who work there as employees and managers, and thereby, in some senses, run the organisation. Accordingly, this involves seeing the Parliament as a working environment, for MPs and employees, for men and women. The institution of Parliament is thus here examined by looking at it from a different and new angle. Instead of the usual focus on politicians the focus is on the administration of this institution. The aim is, amongst other things, to increase knowledge and offer different perspectives on democracy and democratic institutions. Unpacking the nearly mythical institution into smaller, more digestible, graspable realities should at the very least help to remind the wider society that although nations, to a certain extent, do need national institutions they should not become mystified or seen as larger than life. Institutions should work on behalf of people and thus be accountable to these same people. The main contribution of this work is to explore and problematise how managing and working is done inside an institution that both largely fulfils the characteristics of a bureaucracy and yet also has added special features that seem to be rather far removed from clear bureaucratic structures. This research offers a new kind of information on working life inside this elite institution. The joys and the struggles of working and managing in this particular public sector organisation are illustrated here and offer a view, a glimpse, into the experiences of managing and working in this House.
  • Hearn, Jeff; Niemistö, Charlotta; Viallon, Margaux (Hanken School of Economics, 2022-01-18)
    In most organisations, ideas of collaboration and collaborative action are often lauded, but often in practice more challenging to carry into effect. The Hanken School of Economics Research Group on Gender Relations in Organisations, Management and Society, usually known as the Gender Research Group, or just GRG, was launched publicly in 2000. This collection celebrates those 21 years of existence. It brings together memories and reflections from members and former members. It is collective effort from the corridors of Hanken, from elsewhere in Finland, and from beyond. The continuing message is that gender matters, that researching gender and gender relations come in many shapes and sizes, and that these in turn impact in multiple ways on working, organisational and personal lives, and on the changing form of academia and science. In this long-term process, the importance of mutual support and mutual learning cannot be over-stated. “[This publication] … tells me about a supportive community and, (citing from the texts): a relaxed, inspirational and creative atmosphere, eye-opening occasions, honesty, companionship, laughter, friendship, equality, and humour, also when the topics are heavy or personal. At the same time, the meta story conveys the authors’ feeling of being involved in important and meaningful academic work conducted in an international network.” (Professor Emeritus Karl-Erik Sveiby, Hanken School of Economics) “This publication is important because the experiences and accounts of the influences of the Group members to their studies, professional identities, careers and life in general are made visible. The publication shows that any research group, such as the Gender Research Group can have an extensive influence on many spheres of an individual’s life, not solely to the advancement academic contentbased knowledge of a topic in question.” (Professor Anna-Maija Lämsä, Jyväskylä University) ”This delightful volume attests that the most generative moments in research can be found in the meeting of great minds. The personal stories are contagious, highlighting the emotional, serendipitous and transformative sides of research collaboration that too rarely get discussed in published work. Congratulations on this wonderful book!” (Rebecca Piekkari, Marcus Wallenberg Professor of International Business, Aalto University) For anyone interested in getting inspiration on the potential that collaboration can bring, please read on!
  • Niemistö, Charlotta; Hearn, Jeff; Kehn, Carolyn; Tuori, Annamari (2021-03-12)
    This article investigates the gendered dynamics of motherhood and careers, as voiced by professionals in the knowledge-intensive business sector in Finland. It is informed by the CIAR method through 81 iterative, in-depth interviews with 23 women and 19 men. Among the women respondents with no children, one child, or two children, three dominant forms of discursive talk emerge: ‘It takes two to tango’, ‘It’s all about time management’ and ‘Good motherhood 2.0’. Though Finland provides a seemingly egalitarian Nordic welfare state context, with the ‘Finnish Dream’, women face contradictions between expectations of women as full-time ideal workers pursuing masculinist careers and continuing responsibilities at home, performing ‘good motherhood’. The women’s double strivings meet the double constraining demands of these ideals. The gendered pressures are imposed on the women by themselves, male colleagues, the organisation more broadly and society, leading the women to enact a form of ‘bounded individualism’.
  • Tallberg, Teemu (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2003)
    Research on men’s networks and homosociality in and around organisations can produce knowledge on organisational power relations, and contribute to the efforts to promote equality in working life. The search for a conceptual framework to study these issues arises in this paper from my ongoing work on men's social networks and gendered power in and around organisations. Men give each other social support through networks in which formal and informal relationships intermingle, but networks are also contexts of competition and oppression, and of construction of masculinities that are in hierarchical relations with each other and with femininities. For studying the networks men have with each other in work organisations I suggest a broader starting point that contextualises these homosocial networks with men’s other personal relations, and integrates different perspectives deriving from social network analysis, critical studies on men and organisational studies.
  • Salin, Denise (Emerald, 2009)
    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to explore what kind of measures personnel managers have taken to intervene in workplace harassment and to explore how organisational characteristics and the characteristics of the personnel manager affect the choice of response strategies. Design/methodology/approach – The study was exploratory and used a survey design. A web-based questionnaire was sent to the personnel managers of all Finnish municipalities and data on organisational responses and organisational characteristics were collected. Findings – The study showed that the organisations surveyed relied heavily on reconciliatory measures for responding to workplace harassment and that punitive measures were seldom used. Findings indicated that personnel manager gender, size of municipality, use of “sophisticated” human resource management practices and having provided information and training to increase awareness about harassment all influence the organisational responses chosen. Research limitations/implications – Only the effects of organisational and personnel manager characteristics on organisational responses were analysed. Future studies need to include perpetrator characteristics and harassment severity. Practical implications – The study informs both practitioners and policy makers about the measures that have been taken and that can be taken in order to stop harassment. It also questions the effectiveness of written anti-harassment policies for influencing organisational responses to harassment and draws attention to the role of gendered perceptions of harassment for choice of response strategy. Originality/value – This paper fills a gap in harassment research by reporting on the use of different response strategies and by providing initial insights into factors affecting choice of responses.
  • Lund, Rebecca; Tienari, Janne (2018-10-20)
    In this article, we respond to Emma Bell and Amanda Sinclair’s call for reclaiming eros as non-commodified energy that drives academic work. Taking our point of entry from institutional ethnography and the standpoint of junior female academics, we highlight the ambiguity experienced in the neoliberal university in relation to its constructions of potential. We elucidate how potential becomes gendered in and through discourses of passion and care: how epistemic and material detachment from the local is framed as potential and how masculinized passion directs academics to do what counts, while feminized and locally bound care is institutionally appreciated only as far as it supports individualized passion. The way passion and care shape the practices of academic writing and organize the ruling relations of potentiality are challenged through eros, an uncontrollable and un-cooptable energy and longing, which becomes a threat to the gendered neoliberal university and a source of resistance to it. By distinguishing between passion, care, and eros, our institutional ethnography inquiry helps to make sense of the conformity and resistance that characterize the ambiguous experience of today’s academics.