Browsing by Subject "survey"

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  • Hagberg-Andersson, Åsa (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2007-02-28)
    In today’s business one can say that competition does not take place inside the network, but between networks. Change and dynamics are central issues in network studies, and a company, due its changing environment, can identify opportunities and threats and respond to them accordingly. These opportunities are vital, but also complex and demanding for the management. Earlier research has identified a shortcoming in explanations of how the micro-level interactions to macro-level patterns are connected. The IMP-group has been trying to fill this research gap with research on interactions within business networks. In this area of research lies the focus of research on relationships between organizations. Adaptation in cooperation is a central concept within business network research. Adaptation has been dealt with in previous literature, but the focus of the studies has mainly been outside this phenomenon, and it has mostly had a supporting role. Most literature has also described the buyers' point of view in studied supply networks, whereas much less attention has been paid to the suppliers' view on them. This study focuses on this research gap. The results of the study stress that adaptation should be included to a greater extent in the strategy work of companies. The adaptations should be carefully planned and, as far as possible, made consciously. Conscious, well-planned adaptations can be seen as investments into present and future relationships, and resources should be invested into something that does not increase the company’s dependence, but divides the power in the relationship between the companies. Adaptations should be planned so that they result in a more offensive way of responding to the demands that are placed upon the companies. In this way, the actions can be viewed and analyzed in accordance with whether the actions make the company weaker or stronger.
  • Ström, Eva (Svenska handelshögskolan, 2018-11-24)
    To help companies achieve strategic success, new management tools have been invented and introduced over time. One of the most well-established and popular management tools is the Balanced Scorecard (BSC). The BSC was first introduced in the 1990s by Kaplan and Norton as a performance measurement tool that supplemented financial measures with non-financial measures, chosen with regard to strategy. It has then evolved into a strategic management system. This thesis examines how the BSC is related to performance. It suggests that the BSC is associated with performance, because it is used as a strategic management system. Furthermore the research investigates how certain chosen contextual variables enable the BSC to be used as a strategic management system. The BSC contextual variables are the chosen strategy, management’s motives for introducing the BSC and management involvement in the implementation phase. The empirical evidence from Finland and Sweden provide evidence that a BSC that is used as a strategic management system is positively related to performance. Furthermore the empirical evidence shows that a certain focus of strategy and management’s role in supporting the strategy - by introducing management accounting techniques and by actively being involved in the process- has a positive association with the extent to which the BSC is used as a strategic management system. This, in turn, associated with performance. Overall the research highlights the importance of the interplay between the use of an accounting technique- such as the BSC- and the contextual factors that support that use (supporting the use with strategy and management’s active role).
  • Tallberg, Teemu; Hearn, Jeff; Niemistö, Charlotta; Gripenberg, Pernilla; Jyrkinen, Marjut; McKie, Linda (Hanken School of Economics, 2011-08-26)
    This working paper reports the ongoing research conducted in the research project, The Quest for Well-being in Growth Industries: A Collaborative Study in Finland and Scotland, under the auspices of Academy of Finland research programme, The Future of Work and Well-being. The research project examines the contradictory pressures for policies and practices towards both the inhibition and the enhancement of work-related well-being that are likely in growth industries. The overall aim is to evaluate the development, implementation and use of work-related well-being policies in four selected growth industries. These – electronics, care, finance and accounting, and tourism – have been selected on the basis of EU and national forecasts, and demographic and socio-economic trends in standard and non-standard employment. In this paper we aim to review the survey that constitutes the second main phase of this research.