Journal Articles and Conference Papers

Recent Submissions

  • For Joan 
    Hearn, Jeff (2017-11-28)
  • Gummerus, Johanna; Lipkin, Michaela Marie-Louise; Dube, Apramey; Heinonen, Kristina (2019-04)
    Purpose This study aims to introduce and characterize a specific form of self-service technology (SST), customer self-service devices (SSDs), as well as propose and apply a classification scheme of SSDs to encourage future research on such SSTs. Design/methodology/approach The paper is based on conceptual development of customer SSDs and exploratory qualitative insight from representatives of companies offering various types of SSDs. Findings This paper introduces SSDs as customer-possessed and controlled smart service devices aiming to solve problems from the customer’s perspective, often within completely new, customer-defined service processes and ecosystems. SSDs are not confined to the company-controlled service environment, and customers may thus use them wherever and whenever they so wish. The study characterizes SSDs based on service and customer use features, as well as on the subject of the service act (self/other vs belongings) and nature of service act (monitoring vs acting). Research limitations/implications This study is limited to conceptual exploration with qualitative insights from six companies. Future research is needed to empirically study different SSDs by using both qualitative and quantitative approaches in various settings. Originality/value The paper conceptualizes SSDs as an extension to the traditional SST framework. It contributes to the understanding of how personal handheld devices can contribute to customer experiences. It provides research directions to stimulate further research in SSTs.
  • Hearn, Jeff (2019-03-12)
    Following introductory remarks on how the terms “masculinities” and “men” have been used differentially in recent critical studies on men and masculinities (CSMM), the article reviews some key aspects of CSMM - past, present and future. The diverse influences on CSMM have included various feminisms, gay studies, anti-imperialism, civil rights, anti-racism, green and environmental movements, as well as LGBTIQ+ movements, Critical Race Studies, Globalization/Transnational Studies, and Intersectionality Studies. In the present period, the range of theoretical and political approaches and influences on studies continues to grow, with, for example, queer, post-, post post-, new materialist, posthumanist, and science and technology studies, making for some discontinuities with established masculinities theory. In many regions, there are now more women working explicitly and long-term in the area, even if that is itself not new. CSMM have also become more geographically widespread, more dispersed, more comparative, international, transnational, postcolonial, decolonializing, globally “Southern”, global, globalized and globalizing; this diversifying feature is transforming CSMM. Key areas for future research are identified, including the relations of men and masculinities to: first, ecology, environment and climate change; second, ICTs, social media, AI, robotics and big data; third, transnational/global, transnational institutions and processes; and, fourth, nationalism, racism, authoritarianism, neo-fascism and political masculinism. Together, these make for a “lurking doom”. At the same time, there is a whole range of wider theoretical, methodological, epistemological and ontological questions to be taken up in CSMM much more fully in the future.
  • Aspara, Jaakko; Wittkowski, Kristina (2019)
    With sharing economy and access-based consumption, consumers increasingly access goods through social access modes other than private ownership—such as co-ownership, leasing, or borrowing. Prior research focuses on consumers’ attitudinal motivations and consumption-cultural use experiences pertaining to such social exchange–based access modes. In so doing, prior research has overlooked the influence that consumers’ fundamental, even biologically shaped, cognitive traits may have on their choice of access modes. To fill this research gap, this study analyzes a data set of more than 30,000 new car registrations by male consumers in Finland, including cognitive test data from the Finnish Defense Forces and covariates from other governmental sources. The field data suggests that consumers’ intelligence scores and their choice to co-own and lease their cars are positively associated. Econometric evidence further suggests that the association between intelligence and choice of social exchange–based access modes can be explained by intelligent consumers’ higher social trust in people and institutions, as well as two circumstantial mechanisms: their financial standing and tendency to seek savings. The findings from the field data are supported by an additional survey study (n = 460). Implications for the evolution of markets and consumption, as well as human intelligence and cooperation, are discussed.
  • Notelaers, Guy; Törnroos, Maria; Salin, Denise (2019-02-25)
    Previous research shows that work environment factors are important antecedents of workplace bullying (WB), because of the stress they may induce. While previous studies have typically used Karasek’s Job Demand-Control model or the Demands-Resources model, the present study investigates whether another important occupational stress model, that is the Effort-Reward Imbalance model, is also associated to WB. A survey study in 19 Belgian organizations (n = 5727) confirmed that employees experiencing an imbalance between efforts and reward were more likely to be targets of exposure to bullying. In line with previous research, this study illustrates that stressful situations increase the risk of exposure to WB. It shows that the perceived incongruence between effort and reward may increase employee vulnerability to bullying. The perceived injustice may lead employees to engage in norm-breaking behavior and also signal low social standing to others, thereby potentially eliciting negative behaviors from others.
  • Einarsen, Kari; Salin, Denise; Einarsen, Ståle Valvatne; Skogstad, Anders; Mykletun, Reidar Johan (2019)
    Purpose Drawing on the resource-based view, the purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which the level of the organization’s human resource management (HRM) practices, perceived financial resources and organizational size predict the existence of a well-developed ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying. Design/methodology/approach The human resource (HR) managers or the main health and safety representatives (HSRs) in 216 Norwegian municipalities responded to an electronic survey, representing some 50 percent of the municipalities. Findings The level of high-quality HRM practice predicted the existence of an ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying, particularly informal systems represented by a strong conflict management climate. Perceived financial resources did not predict the existence of such ethical infrastructure. Organizational size predicted the existence of policies and having training against bullying. Practical implications This study informs practitioners about organizational resources associated with organization having a well-developed ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying. A high level of high-quality HRM practices seems to be more important for the existence of a well-developed ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying compared to financial resources and organizational size, at least as perceived by HR managers and HSRs. Originality/value This study provides empirical evidence for the importance of having a high level of high-quality HRM practices as predictors of the existence of ethical infrastructure to tackle workplace bullying. An essential finding is that the existence of such an infrastructure is not dependent on distal resources, such as organizational size and perceived financial resources.
  • Saarikko, Ted; Jonsson, Katrin; Burström, Thommie (2018)
    Purpose Faced with environments rife with technological uncertainties, software platforms have gained interest as enablers of innovative businesses and development processes. While extant research has focused on mature platforms, the authors know less about the early phases in a platform’s life cycle. Drawing inspiration from the effectual perspective on entrepreneurship, the purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of how software platforms are established. Design/methodology/approach The authors develop a framework that describes four types of entrepreneurial awareness and then apply it to a qualitative case study of a platform that has emerged from the initial “creation” phase and is now in a period of rapid growth. Findings The study indicates that successful establishment of a software platform depends upon the provider’s ability to integrate business acumen with technical proficiency and leverage these combined skills to ensure short-term viability and long-term relevance in the market. Research limitations/implications This paper contributes to literature on platform strategy, which has previously focused on mature platforms, by addressing entrepreneurial behavior during a software platform’s establishment. As it is based on a single qualitative study, additional studies of different platforms are needed to verify the results. Originality/value The paper highlights the dependence of software platform establishment on the ability to enact both explorative and exploitative activity patterns, and embrace both strategic foresight and systemic insight cognitive patterns. The combined patterns of activity and cognition form four types of awareness, pertaining to markets, resources, technology and contexts.
  • Kovacs, Gyöngyi; Moshtari, Mohammad (2019-07-16)
    Given the substantial costs of natural and man-made disasters (i.e., mortality, morbidity, and financial losses), scholars in operations management and operations research have conducted extensive research in the last decade in a humanitarian setting. A total of 43 studies that reviewed papers on disaster management and humanitarian operation and pointed out the research gaps in this field of study were published from 2006 to 2018. To enhance the rigor and relevance of future studies, this paper focuses on the methodological aspect of studies on humanitarian operations. The study highlights a set of vital items that should be considered when conducting research in a humanitarian setting: including the problem structuring, understanding the contextual factors in a humanitarian setting, acknowledging the uncertainties in humanitarian operations, incorporating uncertainty in the model, enabling technologies in model development and implementation, and selecting appropriate data and research methods. In addition, this study suggests a meta-process for research on humanitarian operations to target a higher level of research quality in this setting. The implications of the study for authors and reviewers of manuscripts and research proposals are discussed in the last section of the paper.
  • Harpring, Russell Edward; Deck, Stacy M.; Barber, Rod (2011-11-23)
  • Salin, Denise; Cowan, Renee; Adewumi, Oluwakemi; Apospori, Eleni; Bochantin, Jaime; D'Cruz, Premilla; Djurkovic, Nikola; Durniat, Katarzyna; Escartín, Jordi; Guo, Jing; Išik, Idil; Koeszegi, Sabine T.; McCormack, Darcy; Monserrat, Silvia Inés; Zedlacher, Eva (2018)
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyze cross-national and cross-cultural similarities and differences in perceptions and conceptualizations of workplace bullying among human resource professionals (HRPs). Particular emphasis was given to what kind of behaviors are considered as bullying in different countries and what criteria interviewees use to decide whether a particular behavior is bullying or not. Design/methodology/approach HRPs in 13 different countries/regions (n=199), spanning all continents and all GLOBE cultural clusters (House et al., 2004), were interviewed and a qualitative content analysis was carried out. Findings Whereas interviewees across the different countries largely saw personal harassment and physical intimidation as bullying, work-related negative acts and social exclusion were construed very differently in the different countries. Repetition, negative effects on the target, intention to harm, and lack of a business case were decision criteria typically used by interviewees across the globe – other criteria varied by country. Practical implications The results help HRPs working in multinational organizations understand different perceptions of negative acts. Originality/value The findings point to the importance of cultural factors, such as power distance and performance orientation, and other contextual factors, such as economy and legislation for understanding varying conceptualizations of bullying.
  • Harviainen, J. Tuomas; Ojasalo, Jukka; Kumar, Somasundaram Nanda (2018-02-18)
    This article examines the service design of freemium game pricing. Freemium games are a type of game that is partially free to play, but its players are able to access various options by playing real money. The article increases knowledge of the usability of service design processes in the pricing of mobile games, as well as the understanding of central aspects of freemium pricing models from the perspective of user experience and customer value. Existing research shows that one major reason for failing freemium pricing models is the orientation for technology development, alongside poor content and too aggressive monetization, rather than customer experience. The article presents a process in which an alternative pricing model was developed for freemium games, through the use of service design workshops.
  • Einola, Katja; Alvesson, Mats (2019-02-15)
    Contemporary expert organizations rely heavily on cross-border, often temporary teams typically working through virtual means of communication. While static aspects of teams are well researched, there have been considerably fewer studies on team dynamics and team processes. Existing process studies tend to take a cautious, entitybased approach, emphasizing team structure as much as (or even more than) processual aspects. This article represents a shift from studying teams as entities and structures changing over time to studying teams as an on-going process. Participants engage in teaming and thus in the continued making and sometimes unmaking of teams. We report on a study of three anatomically similar, self-managed teams performing the same set of complex tasks with radically different teaming processes. With more or less successful shared sensemaking, the team members collectively create (or fail to create) not only team task outputs but also the team itself.
  • Nikolaev, Boris; Shir, Nadav; Wiklund, Johan (2019-01-23)
    Affect is increasingly studied within entrepreneurship. We develop a partial mediation model in which positive and negative dispositional affect influences entry into entrepreneurship, suggesting that those experiencing greater negative affect experience less job satisfaction and are more likely to enter entrepreneurship. Using a novel methodological approach to capture affective disposition, we test our model on a large panel dataset from Australia, finding support for our hypotheses. These findings provide a much-needed counterbalance to the prevailing focus in entrepreneurship on the positive consequences of positive affect and introduce affect into the study of the fundamental question of why some people but not others become entrepreneurs in the first place.
  • Cooper, Ilan; Fraga Martins Maio, Paulo (2019)
    We estimate conditional multifactor models over a large cross-section of stock returns matching 25 CAPM anomalies. Using conditioning information associated with different instruments improves the performance of the Hou, Xue, and Zhang (2015, HXZ) and Fama and French (2015, 2016, FF) models. The largest increase in performance holds for momentum, investment, and intangibles-based anomalies. Yet, there are significant differences in scaled models' performance: HXZ clearly dominates FF in explaining momentum and profitability anomalies, while the converse holds for value-growth anomalies. Thus, the asset pricing implications of alternative investment and profitability factors (in a conditional setting) differ in a non-trivial way.
  • Bruun, Niklas; Norrgård, Marcus (2018-12-20)
  • Annala, Linda; Polsa, Pia; Kovacs, Gyöngyi (2019)
    Purpose The institutional logic in developing countries is changing from aid toward trade, having implications for institutionally embedded supply chains (SCs) and their members. The purpose of this study is to investigate the transition from aid toward trade through a theoretical lens of institutional logics and the implications of changing logics for SC members and designs. Design/methodology/approach This is a large-scale qualitative study of the SCs of maintenance and repair operations (MRO) of water points. Empirical data were collected via 53 semi-structured interviews, observations, including photographs, and field notes from several echelons of MRO SCs in ten different Ethiopian districts. Findings In spite of the same underlying tenet of a unidirectional trajectory toward a business logic, the study shows that the co-existence or constellation of different institutional logics resulted in diverse practices that impacted SC design. Research limitations/implications The research was carried out in the MRO SC at a time of changing institutional logics, thereby being able to study their transition or constellation of logics. Practical implications The research has implications for policymakers and development practitioners: when designing and implementing rural water supply programs, the presence of co-existing logics and the lack of uniform SC designs should not be viewed as a hindrance. In fact, the study showed how constellations of logics can provide ways through which water points continue functioning and providing clean drinking water to the communities. Originality/value Few studies so far have focused on institutional logics and their implications for SC design.
  • Wiklund, Johan; Nikolaev, Boris; Shir, Nadav; Foo, Maw-Der; Bradley, Steve (2019-01-22)
    Entrepreneurship research typically emphasizes firm-level outcomes such as growth and performance. However, people pursue entrepreneurship for deeply personal, idiosyncratic reasons. Therefore, as in other self-organized human pursuits, how entrepreneurship relates to fulfillment and well-being is of utmost importance. In this paper, we provide an overview of the well-being concept, related research, and its connection to entrepreneurship. We define entrepreneurial well-being as the experience of satisfaction, positive affect, infrequent negative affect, and psychological functioning in relation to developing, starting, growing, and running an entrepreneurial venture. We explain this definition of entrepreneurial well-being and review significant developments in our field and the broader field of well-being. Highlights of social, technological and institutional trends illustrate key areas for future research that can enhance our understanding of these phenomena. The eight papers in this special issue focus on entrepreneurial well-being each offering a specific perspective on how scholars can theorize and study the antecedents and consequences of entrepreneurship related to well-being.
  • Hyytinen, Ari; Steen, Frode; Toivanen, Otto (2018)
    How many cartels are there, and how long do they live? The answers to these questions are important in assessing the need for competition policy. We present a Hidden Markov Model that takes into account that often it is not known whether a cartel exists or not. We take the model to data from a period of legal cartels - Finnish manufacturing industries 1951-1990. Our estimates suggest that once born, cartels are persistent; by the end of the period, almost all industries were cartelized.

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