Journal Articles and Conference Papers: Recent submissions

Now showing items 1-20 of 600
  • Teeroovengadum, Viraiyan; Nunkoo, Robin; Grönroos, Christian; Kamalanabhan, T.J.; Keshwar Seebaluck, Ashley (2019-10-14)
    Purpose The purpose of this study is to validate the higher education service quality (HESQUAL) scale using a confirmatory approach and test an improved structural model that predicts student loyalty from image, perceived value, satisfaction and service quality. In addition to validating the HESQUAL scale using a confirmatory approach, two other main limitations in the extant literature are addressed. Design/methodology/approach The model is tested using data collected from 501 students enrolled in different higher education institutions in Mauritius. A two-stage approach to structural equation modeling is used whereby the measurement model is first tested using confirmatory factor analysis and followed by the assessment of the structural model. Findings Importantly, results indicate that student satisfaction is influenced by technical service quality, image and perceived value, but not by functional service quality. Both dimensions of service quality however are significant predictors of image and perceived value. The study uses a comprehensive measure of service quality and demonstrates that it is worthwhile to consider functional service quality as higher-order model and clearly distinguish between functional and technical quality, as both the technical and functional aspects play an important role in shaping students’ perceptions and behaviors. Originality/value First, in the existing literature, service quality has not been considered as a second-order factor model in structural models of student satisfaction and loyalty, thus lacking either precision or parsimony. Second, the transformative quality aspect of higher education has been largely neglected in previous research testing such predictive models. The model delineates service quality into the functional and transformative (technical) aspects and treats functional service quality as a second-order factor comprising nine sub-dimensions.
  • Breckle, Margit Angelika (2019)
    Der vorliegende Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit Sprachbewusstheit von Mitarbeiter/inne/n finnischer Unternehmen als L2-Nutzer/innen, wobei die Reflexion der plurilingualen Aktivitäten Sprachenwechsel, Codeswitching, Sprachmittlung und Transfer im Mittel-punkt der Betrachtung steht. Die Datengrundlage umfasst neun semi-strukturierte Inter-views, die im Rahmen des Projekts Unternehmenskommunikation zwischen Pohjanmaa und den deutschsprachigen Ländern durchgeführt wurden. Den theoretischen Rahmen bilden Sprachbewusstheit, plurilinguale Kompetenz und das Dynamische Modell der Mehrsprachigkeit (DMM) zur Beschreibung mehrsprachiger Sprachbeherrschung. Ziel des Beitrags ist es, auf Basis der Reflexionen der L2-Nutzer/innen plurilinguale Aspekte der Sprachverwendung offenzulegen und Sprachbewusstheit im beruflichen Kontext anhand ausgewählter Beispiele zu diskutieren. Die Untersuchung zeigt, dass plurilinguale Aktivitäten durch die interviewten Mitarbeiter/innen reflektiert werden, auch wenn sie ihre Erkenntnisse in unterschiedlichem Maße beschreiben (können). Einige der Reflexionen könnten sich als Hinweis auf ein erhöhtes multilinguales Bewusstsein und einen erweiterten mehrsprachigen Monitor im Sinne des Dynamischen Modells der Mehrsprachigkeit (DMM) deuten lassen.
  • Davey, Janet; Grönroos, Christian (2019-07-29)
    Purpose Although health-care features prominently in transformative service research, there is little to guide service providers on how to improve well-being and social change transformations. This paper aims to explore actor-level interactions in transformative services, proposing that actors’ complementary health service literacy roles are fundamental to resource integration and joint value creation. Design/methodology/approach In-depth interviews with 46 primary health-care patients and 11 health-care service providers (HSPs) were conducted focusing on their subjective experiences of health literacy. An iterative hermeneutic approach was used to analyse the textual data linking it with existing theory. Findings Data analysis identified patients’ and HSPs’ health service literacy roles and corresponding role readiness dimensions. Four propositions are developed describing how these roles influence resource integration processes. Complementary service literacy roles enhance resource integration with outcomes of respect, trust, empowerment and loyalty. Competing service literacy roles lead to outcomes of discredit, frustration, resistance and exit through unsuccessful resource integration. Originality/value Health service literacy roles – linked to actor agency, institutional norms and service processes – provide a nuanced approach to understanding the tensions between patient empowerment trends and service professionals’ desire for recognition of their expertise over patient care. Specifically, the authors extend Frow et al.’s (2016) list of co-creation practices with practices that complement actors’ service literacy and role readiness. Based on a service perspective, the authors encourage transformative service researchers, service professionals and health service system designers, to recognize complementary health service literacy roles as an opportunity to support patients’ resources and facilitate value co-creation.
  • Anokhin, Sergey; Wincent, Joakim; Parida, Vinit; Chistyakova, Natalya; Oghazi, Pejvak (2018-10-25)
    For a sample of all 88 counties in the State of Ohio over a 5-year period, this study documents the effect of flagship enterprises and concentrated industrial clusters on regional innovation. Consistent with the agglomeration arguments and the knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship, both appear to affect regional innovation positively. Additionally, regional educational attainment positively moderates the effect of industrial clusters on innovation. At the same time, flagship enterprises primarily affect regional innovation in regions with low education levels. Results are obtained with the help of conservative econometric techniques and are robust to the choice of alternative dependent variables and estimators. The findings have major policy implications and provide insights into alternative routes to encouraging regional innovation.
  • Parida, Vinit; Wincent, Joakim (2019-03-15)
    This article reviews and discusses how to compete with sustainability by reviewing the literature about sustainability, business models, innovation, and networks. It is an introduction to the special issue on “innovative inter-organizational networks and sustainable economy: current trends and future opportunities” and a call for more research where we examine and outline ideas for how the new and rapidly spreading trends of digitalization, the circular economy, and servitization are force firms to develop new types of competitive advantages. We elaborate upon the transformation needs at firm-level capabilities and business models, as well as network-level changes through the formation of new ecosystems and new ways of engaging in co-creation with partners. These firm and network level transformation discussions are complimented with specific list potential areas for future academic research.
  • van Gelderen, Marco; Kibler, Ewald; Kautonen, Teemu; Munoz, Pablo; Wincent, Joakim (2019)
    Mindfulness, meaning a receptive attention to and awareness of present events and experience, is reported to have a wide range of benefits, but it has been suggested that it could prove costly in terms of task performance. This article analyzes how dispositional mindfulness relates to taking entrepreneurial action. Based on two waves of survey data, we find that mindful individuals are less likely to engage in entrepreneurial action than less mindful individuals, but when they do start to act, they take as many actions as individuals who score low on trait mindfulness, and even more if they have entrepreneurial experience.
  • Cenamor, Javier; Parida, Vinit; Wincent, Joakim (2019-04-03)
    Digitalization offers unprecedented opportunities for entrepreneurial small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). However, many entrepreneurial SMEs lack resources and capabilities or suffer from inertia, which hampers these opportunities. This study investigates how entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance performance through digital platforms. Specifically, the study examines the effect of digital platform capability and network capability on entrepreneurial SMEs’ financial performance. The study also examines how exploitation and exploration orientations moderate this relationship. Based on analysis of 230 entrepreneurial SMEs, the results indicate that digital platform capability has a positive indirect effect on entrepreneurial SMEs’ performance via network capability. The study also shows that exploitation and exploration orientations negatively and positively moderate this effect, respectively. The results suggest that entrepreneurial SMEs can enhance their performance through digital platform capability by aligning this capability with their orientation. These findings thereby enrich the literature on entrepreneurial SMEs and capabilities.
  • Stroe, Silvia; Sirén, Charlotta; Shepherd, Dean; Wincent, Joakim (2019-07-19)
    Across two studies, we theorize and empirically investigate passion as a moderator of the negative affective consequences of fear of failure in early-stage entrepreneurship. We test our hypotheses in two field studies of naturally occurring affective events—namely, pitching competitions—and we complement self-reported measures of negative affect with physio-psychological measures obtained from analyzing entrepreneurs' facial expressions. The results confirm that in failure-relevant situations, dispositional fear of failure may lead to higher negative affect depending on the dualistic regulatory effect of passion—harmonious passion dampens the influence of fear of failure on negative affect (Studies 1 and 2), while obsessive passion magnifies this effect in Study 1 but dampens it in Study 2, thus showing mixed evidence. Our work is one of the first to investigate how early-stage entrepreneurs experience negative affect during typical entrepreneurial events as a result of their dispositional traits and their type and level of passion.
  • Ehrnström-Fuentes, Maria; Leipämaa-Leskinen, Hanna (2019-07-31)
    Self-organization is a term that is increasingly used to describe how engaged citizens come together to create sustainable food systems at the local community level. Yet, there is a lack of understanding of what this self-organizing activity actually means. While previous literature has addressed self-organization as an outcome of building consensus and a collective intentionality shared by the members of a group, we focus on the complex social processes involved when people with a diverse set of interests and motivations interact in the food network. In this study, we analyze what kinds of boundary negotiations emerge when grassroots-led food networks scale up. Our embedded single case study focuses on a REKO (‘REjäl KOnsumtion’, meaning ‘fair consumption’ in English) network in Finland comprising distributed local food groups and three types of actors: consumers, producers, and local administrators. We examine a conflict that arose within the REKO network in May–June 2016 when a small group of actors demanded that all local groups should implement similar rules, principles, and ethical standards. Our findings illustrate how moral, geographic, market, and power boundaries emerge in a self-organized grassroots-led food network. We further explicate the challenges that may appear within a self-organized grassroots-led food network, as it grows in scale and scope.
  • Jytilä, Riitta; Laakso, Mikael (Tieteellisten Seurain Valtuuskunta, 2019)
    Selvityksen tarkoitus ei ole ulkoapäin määritellä kullekin lehdelle sopivia toimintatapoja tai lisätä julkaisuprosessin byrokraattisuutta. Sen sijaan eetoksena on lisätä ymmärrystä vertaisarvioinnin eri keinoista ja käytännöistä erityisesti suhteessa tieteen avoimuuteen. Avointa julkaisemista on monessa yhteydessä edistetty erilaisilla pakotteilla ja vahvoilla kannustimilla. Päätelmämme kerätyn aineiston pohjalta on, että yksinkertaiset ja hyvin yleisen tason linjaukset eivät sovellu kovinkaan hyvin avoimen vertaisarvioinnin edistämiseen. Parasta olisi, jos kukin lehti ja kustantaja arvioisi itse omista lähtökohdistaan sekä lehden erityisten intressien kannalta, mitkä avoimen vertaisarvioinnin osa-alueista kannattaisi ottaa käyttöön.
  • Heaslip, Graham; Stuns, Karl-Kristian (2019-08-08)
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of humanitarian logistics training for the Finnish Red Cross (FRC) Emergency Response Unit (ERU) delegates, and the factors that influence its success. The managerial purpose of this research is to support the FRC in improving their Logistics ERU Foundation training. Additionally, this research provides humanitarian organisations, engaged in emergency response efforts, insights for logistics training design. Design/methodology/approach This is a case study examining the FRC, with qualitative data being collected in a field study, utilising participant observation and in-context interview techniques for rich data collection. Findings This research evaluated the effectiveness of the Logistics ERU Foundation training of the FRC by adapting the four-level training evaluation model by Kirkpatrick and transfer of training theories. The research has contributed to Gralla et al.’s (2015) call for further research in evaluating what people learn from humanitarian logistics trainings and in documenting and sharing experiences with specific training programs. Practical implications The conceptual framework serves as a basis for exploratory qualitative investigation of training transfer, from the perspectives of trainees, facilitators and human resource personnel. Originality/value This research contributes to the humanitarian community by identifying gaps in Red Cross Logistics ERU training and to the development of curricula content relating to Red Cross logistics response phase operations. Additionally, this gives other humanitarian organisations, operating in the response phase of natural disasters, insights for logistics training design.
  • Liljeblom, Eva; Maury, Benjamin; Hörhammer, Alexander (2019-07-30)
    Purpose – State ownership has been common especially in industries with restricted competition. In Russia, state controlled firms represent around 41% of the market value of all listed firms (Deloitte, 2015). Yet, there is a significant gap in the literature regarding the effects of various forms of government control in listed firms. The purpose of this study is to fill this gap by exploring the impact of the complexity of state ownership and competition on the performance of Russian listed firms. Design/methodology/approach – The sample consists of data for 72 firms (360 firm-years) in the Russian MOEX broad market index during 2011-2015. The complexity of state ownership is captured by studying forms of state control including majority/minority, direct/indirect, federal/regional, mixed structures, and golden shares. Findings – We find significant differences in performance relating to different forms of state ownership. State control is negatively related to firm valuation and the sales/employees ratio. Performance is weakest when state ownership takes the form minority, regional, or direct ownership. State control through golden shares typically outperforms other state controlled firms. We find indications of employment prioritization beyond the economical optimum. In addition, the relation between state ownership and profitability becomes positive in sectors where state firms appear to enjoy lower competition. Originality/value – While the effects of state ownership have been studied on many markets, there is a lack of studies on the effects of different forms, or the complexity, of state ownership beyond direct and indirect ownership. We contribute to the literature on the performance effects of state ownership by studying a multitude of forms of governmental ownership as well as the role of competition in Russia. Especially the profitability of state controlled firms is significantly affected by industry characteristics. Implications of the results are discussed both from firm and policy maker perspectives.
  • Björk, Bo-Christer (2019-03-19)
    The number of open access (OA) journals and their share of all scholarly journals are usually estimated based on indexing in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). DOAJ's coverage of OA journals from different regions of the world is, however, far from complete, particularly of journals publishing in languages other than English. Using alternative data sources for identification and manual verification, 437 scholarly OA journals published in the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) were identified, and some key characteristics were studied. Of these, only 184 were indexed in DOAJ. A vast majority of the journals was published by scholarly societies or universities. Social sciences and humanities dominated as topics, and few journals charge authors. National or university-specific OJS portals have played a major role in enabling OA publishing. Around a third of the Nordic scholarly journals are currently OA.
  • Nyström, Anna-Greta; Mickelsson, Karl-Jacob (2019-05-20)
    Purpose Previous research on advertising in digital contexts has emphasized its persuasive and information processing roles for the customer. This paper aims to problematize this point of view and argues that the converged and interactive nature of digital media makes all advertising content into potential points of engagement in a digital media journey. Design/methodology/approach The paper is conceptual in nature and applies service logic (SL) and customer engagement to reconceptualize digital advertising and selling. Findings The authors present digital advertisements and digital media content as elements that contribute to a digital media journey, which ideally leads to a purchase. Advertising content is regarded as a resource used by consumers in their underlying value-creating processes. Thus, the digital advertising process is conceptualized as a customer-driven process of engaging with digital media content, where a purchase is incorporated in (and naturally follows from) the theme of engagement. Research limitations/implications The paper introduces the concept of contextually embedded selling, which refers to a process where digital advertising content is thematically congruent with the surrounding editorial content, so that both contribute to the same consumer journey. Otherwise, consumers experience a contextual jump – a disconnect in theme, place or time during the consumer’s process of engagement with the digital content. Originality/value The paper contributes to advertising theory on advertising, engagement and the emerging research on consumer journey design by presenting an approach based on SL, namely, contextually embedded digital selling.
  • Kauppinen-Räisänen, Hannele; Gummerus, Johanna; von Koskull, Catharina; Christini, Helene (2019-06-28)
    Purpose The aim of this study was to explore what luxury represents to contemporary consumers in their own life contexts. Design/methodology/approach A mixed-method qualitative approach was adopted that comprised individual, personal interviews and focused interviews with small groups. Findings The study contributes to the field of luxury research by (1) highlighting consumers’ interpretations of luxury as highly subjective, relative and contextual; (2) showing that according to consumers, luxury relates to both consumption and non-consumption contexts; (3) illustrating the value of luxury as a multidimensional construct in both contexts; and (4) demonstrating how luxury may relate to a consumer’s desire to be meaningful and genuine, thereby generating prudential value. In these cases, luxury is closely linked to consumers’ perceptions of meaningfulness and well-being. Practical implications For marketing managers, the findings suggest that the wave of new luxury – seeking meaningfulness – may serve as a novel means of branding. Originality/value This study demonstrates that the significance of the concept of luxury transcends commercial settings and offerings, i.e., the brand, product or service. The findings show that luxury may also be generated in non-commercial contexts and specific activities (e.g., running, gardening). Based on these findings, it is proposed that luxury in non-commercial settings is characteristic of the new wave of luxury; and that in such settings, luxury may contribute to personal well-being, thereby generating prudential value.
  • Ittonen, Kim; Myllymäki, Emma-Riikka; Tronnes, Per Christen (2019-07-01)
    Purpose This paper focuses on bankaudit committees and examines whether audit committee members who are formerauditors are associated with the acquisition of audit and non-audit servicesfrom their former employers.   Design/methodology/approach The study empirically examinesa sample of large banks that are included in the S&P Composite 1500.   Findings The paper reportssignificantly lower audit fees and a higher proportion of non-audit fees tototal fees when the audit committee chair is an alumnus of the incumbent auditfirm. Moreover, additional analysis reveals that these findings are strongerfor banks with more earnings management.   Researchlimitations/implications Overall, the findings indicatethat audit firms might consider banks using their alumni as audit committeechairs to be less risky or easier to audit, thus requiring relatively lesseffort from the auditors. The reduced effort required to audit clients withaudit firm alumni on their audit committees then has the effect of reducing theaudit fees charged. Alternatively, their auditing experience and cognitiveproximity might influence the assessment of the need for auditing or theability to negotiate lower audit fees on the part of audit firm alumni.   Originality/value This paper provides empiricalevidence of the association between audit firm alumni in influential positionson an audit committee and fees paid to those audit firms in the bankingindustry. The findings contribute to the literature by suggesting that bankswith affiliated former auditors chairing their audit committees not only havesignificantly lower audit fees but also a higher proportion is spent onnon-audit services.
  • Lundqvist, Alex; Liljeblom, Eva; Löflund, Anders; Maury, Benjamin (2019-07-24)
    Purpose The cultural and legal differences between foreign acquirers and African target firms can be substantial. There is also a large variation in cultures and legal systems within Africa. However, there is limited research on merger and acquisition (M&A) performance by foreign firms in Africa. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap by exploring the “spillover by law” hypothesis (Martynova and Renneboog, 2008) that focuses on the influence of the external environment on the governance and performance of foreign M&As in Africa.   Design/methodology/approach The data set covers 415 M&A transactions by foreign firms in Africa during the period of 1999–2016. Dynamic data covering the country’s legal, cultural and political environment are collected from the World Bank, the Heritage Foundation and Transparency International.   Findings The authors find that the legal environment significantly affects the returns of bidders on African firms. For complete acquisitions, bidder returns are significantly higher when the bidder’s country has higher shareholder protection and higher creditor protection compared with the target firm’s country. The results show that the effects are significant when there is a full control change (including a change in the target firm’s nationality) but not in the case of partial control transfers. The results are consistent with the “spillover by law” hypothesis.   Originality/value The authors contribute to the literature on cross-border M&As by separately studying the valuation effects of full, majority and minority changes in control; by being the first study of the legal spillover effects in Africa; and by being the most extensive study of the legal determinants of the valuations of non-African acquirers of African firms.
  • Björk, Bo-Christer (2019-07-30)
    The acceptance rate of scholarly journals is an important selection criterion for authors choosing where to submit their manuscripts. Unfortunately, information about the acceptance (or rejection rates) of individual journals is seldom avai- lable. This article surveys available systematic information and studies of acceptance rates. The overall global average is around 35-40%. There are significant differences between fields of science, with biomedicine having higher acceptance rates compared to for instance the social sciences. Open access journals usually have higher acceptance rates than subs- cription journals, and this is particularly true for so-called OA mega-journals, which have peer review criteria focusing on sound science only.
  • Wies, Simone; Hoffmann, Arvid Oskar Ivar; Aspara, Jaakko; Pennings, Joost M.E. (2019-05-02)
    Shareholder complaints put pressure on publicly listed firms, yet firms rarely directly address the actual issues raised in these complaints. The authors examine whether firms respond in an alternative way by altering advertising investments in an effort to ward off the financial damage associated with shareholder complaints. By analyzing a unique data set of shareholder complaints submitted to S&P 1500 firms between 2001 and 2016, supplemented with qualitative interviews of executives of publicly listed firms, the authors document that firms increase advertising investments following shareholder complaints and that such an advertising investment response mitigates a postcomplaint decline in firm value. Furthermore, results suggest that firms are more likely to increase advertising investments when shareholder complaints are submitted by institutional investors, pertain to nonfinancial concerns, and relate to topics that receive high media attention. The findings provide new insights on how firms address stock market adversities with advertising investments and inform managers about the effectiveness of such a response.
  • Korkeamäki, Timo; Virk, Nader; Wang, Haizhi; Wang, Peng (2019-07-01)
    We analyze preferences of foreign institutional investors in the Chinese stock market in a sample that covers 2003 to 2014. We find that foreign investors changed their investment behavior during the sample period from generic patterns found in much of the world to China-specific patterns. The results suggest that foreign institutions learned to adjust their investment behavior to account for unique features of the Chinese market. Rather than following the diversified portfolio approach, they follow investment strategies that focus on a limited number of firm features.