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  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2016-08-08)
    According to our vision, Hanken will by 2015 have consolidated its position as a leading, accredited university with international appeal. The year 2005 was an important year for achieving this vision. We obtained the targets that we had together set for our operations notwithstanding the pressure for changes in the Finnish academic community, which was stronger than ever before. One of the major achievements during the year was our success in engaging a growing number of people in our efforts to reach our common vision. Among the most important groups were the Hanken alumni, our new alliances, the recruitment of new researchers and teachers, our foreign students, and all the people who participated in the EQUIS accreditation process. We were also able to renew our manner of operating. This was achieved through, e.g. positive experiences from internal management training and new forms of co-operation with business life within the framework of research and development programmes financed by the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology, Tekes. All who have participated in the process have contributed, and will contribute to the improvement of our opportunities to achieve our vision. Hanken's international character was consolidated in many respects. Our European quality accreditation, EQUIS, was renewed during the year. Hanken also arranged the first Hanken Day together with the alumni, in accordance with international examples. Participation was active, and we managed to create an unforgettable event for our alumni. Hanken & IFL Corporate Development was created in co-operation with the Stockholm School of Economics. The aim is to develop executive education of an internationally high standard for corporations. Hanken was the first university in Finland to introduce the so-called tenure track system. The aim is to recruit and maintain top researchers who have recently taken their doctor's degree and wish to research and educate students for global business and the international research community. The tenure track system will markedly consolidate Hanken's focus on its core areas. Over several decades, our internationalisation has to a great extent been based on the high-quality language studies that we offer and our students' excellent language skills. This also holds true today. The situation has, however, changed markedly, as the basis of the international nature of Hanken is today much broader than before. This is the basic precondition for success in competition with other leading universities of the world. We have both the ambition and preconditions for achieving these goals. Hanken can today be grateful for the concrete, strong and in fact unlimited commitment for achieving these goals. This opens a promising future for us. Marianne Stenius, Rector
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2016-08-10)
    In many respects, 2009 was an exceptional year for Hanken School of Economics. One hundred years had passed since Högre Svenska Handelsläroverket, the forerunner of the current School, started its activities. In addition to this important anniversary, the year was also characterised by the historic reform of the Universities Act and by the global economic crisis. In June the Parliament of Finland approved the new Universities Act after several years of intensive preparation. This allowed the School to establish a new framework for its organisational structure and decision-making during the autumn. A university council consisting of faculty, staff and students elected a new board. Although at that stage the School was not yet ready to elect a board with an external majority, as allowed by the new Universities Act, it is already clear that the role of the board will change and develop to the benefit of the School. During the year a new overall strategy for the School was prepared, which was characterised both by increased international ambitions in terms of research and teaching and by greater interaction with the surrounding world in which Hanken operates. Efforts to strengthen the School’s international competitiveness continued throughout the year. Those Hanken students who began their studies in 2009 are the first to study according to degree regulations that include a period of study abroad as a course requirement. This initiative, which can now be realised after several years’ preparation, was well received by the students. In order to develop Hanken School of Economics and strengthen the conditions for recruiting researchers, teachers and students, the School initiated the process for obtaining the international AACSB accreditation. The new Universities Act creates better conditions for the School’s interaction with the business community. During the year, preparations were made for an incorporation of the successful co-operation in executive education developed by Hanken over the last few years with the Stockholm School of Economics. The new company, Hanken & SSE Executive Education, was able to begin operations at the start of 2010. In order to strengthen the universities’ financial structure, the Finnish government decided to support fundraising by universities. The School began fundraising during the year. Although the economic crisis was expected to make fundraising more difficult, the campaign rapidly gained momentum. Despite the fact that the campaign is not yet finished, it is perfectly clear that the fundraising targets set by the School will be met and indeed exceeded. This should be regarded as a sign of strong confidence in the School, while at the same time it creates some financial leeway for new initiatives. Under the motto “100 years of future”, the School celebrated its centenary with a large number of activities. The year brought with it greater visibility for the School, and at the same time it became a meeting point for Hanken alumni and target groups that had not previously been linked to Hanken. The centenary year concluded with a ceremonial conferment of doctoral degrees, the largest ever in the history of the School. The year, unforgettable in so many respects, revealed the depth and breadth of the School’s activities and of its relations with the surrounding world. The activities during the year also demonstrated that there is a readiness within the School for innovation and change. The School would like to express its heartfelt thanks for the commitment and interest shown during this centenary year.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2015-04-13)
    Hanken’s long-term strategy is aimed at developing Hanken as a research-intensive and international business school with close ties to the corporate world. During 2011, we have strengthened our capital base, introduced new incentives to raise the quality of research and teaching and taken on challenges presented by the ever increasing competition in the education market. Following our recently concluded fundraising campaign, our finances are better than ever. By the end of June 2011, when the period for state matching expired, 15.7 million euro in external funding had been raised. Hanken not only exceeded its monetary target of 10 million euro, which was set up at the start of the campaign, but also exceeded its target of 1 000 donors, where the eventual outcome was over 1 200. Including the state contribution, Hanken’s basic capital has been increased by approximately 55 million euro. According to Hanken’s strategy, the education shall be research-based and Hanken shall be a leading autonomous business school in northern Europe by 2020. Such a position means that the research must be of the highest quality. Hanken has already introduced many incentives to further raise the quality of research and teaching, and positive results can already be discerned. An increased study pace should also be promoted, even though the university’s opportunities to influence this are limited. Analyses of the structure of studies have not indicated any direct bottlenecks that might slow the rate of study. At Hanken, many incentives are already in use, such as the Rector’s List Scholarships, which were introduced in 2011 for the very best students. Hanken welcomes further incentives from the public sector, such as financial motivators to increase study pace, since these have a broader impact than the university’s own measures. In many ways, Hanken is already one of Finland’s most international universities. Graduates from Hanken are more likely to work abroad. Their studies include an integrated semester of international exchange studies or an internship abroad. An increasing proportion of Hanken’s researchers have an international background and experience. Increased internationalisation does however bring a need for more student scholarships and foreign alumni events and will bring an increasing need for so-called entry services for incoming researchers, as well as a competitive infrastructure for research and teaching. Increased internationalisation also affects and puts pressure on Hanken’s executive education. The future is full of challenges in the education market, which is marked by tougher competition and more internationalisation. Both in spite of and thanks to its small size, Hanken has a strong position in the Nordic region and northern Europe. Not least because of its stable economy, the school has every opportunity to develop in line with its strategy for 2012.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2015-04-13)
    The year 2012 proved successful for Hanken on many levels. The School continued fulfilling its strategy, focusing on research, internationalisation and strengthening its ties to the corporate world, and, moreover, could do so from a solid financial position. The external evaluation of Hanken’s research, conducted by a panel of distinguished international academics, confirmed my own perception that the research conducted at Hanken meets the highest international standard in many areas. I am also happy to see that that the investments made in research have already borne fruit. An indication of this is the doubling of the number of articles published this year by Hanken researchers in high- level international peer-reviewed journals, compared to the previous year. Hanken’s strong focus on research will continue. An important part of this work is the two-year Research Professorship, which was set up for the first time in 2012, an initiative that we aim to continue in coming years. The School has put considerable effort into improving student progress through e.g.individual guidance, visiting work activities, and other incentives. These efforts resulted in Hanken exceeding its set goals of graduates on both the bachelor’s and the master’s level. Hanken has also vigorously worked with following up on student learning and has for 2013 appointed a working group with the task of improving the quality of teaching even further. I am very pleased to see the positive development in internationalisation among the School’s faculty and students. In 2012, Hanken met its target of 20 per cent of the faculty (excluding employed doctoral students) having an international background. Hanken’s investment in integrating a mandatory period abroad has proven successful. This is clearly visible in the steady increase in the number of incoming and outgoing exchange students, along with the number of study credits Hanken students complete abroad while on exchange. Thanks to the commitment shown within the fundraising campaign HANKEN 100, the School entered the year 2012 with a strong balance. By the end of the year the assets had further increased and the invested donations showed very good returns. We have also been very fortunate in witnessing continued financial support in 2012, Hanken received donations totalling 310 000 euro. These donations have been allocated to modernising Hanken’s campuses and to Initial Phase Scholarships for doctoral students enrolled in the Hanken PhD Programme. I wish to thank all faculty and staff, donors, collaboration partners and students for a successful year. I hope the good cooperation between all of us will continue and deepen during 2013!
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2015-06-12)
    Hanken School of Economics is a leading, internationally accredited business school in Finland. Hanken was founded more than a hundred years ago and is thus one of the oldest business schools in the Nordic region. Today, Hanken is a business school with clearly defined areas of strength: Economics, Finance, Management and Organisation, and Marketing. Hanken is a research-intensive business school where all education is research-based. Hanken has an international approach, where internationalisation and multilingualism increasingly permeate all areas of activity. The School offers the full range of academic degrees and executive education on two campuses. In order to maintain practical relevance in all activities, our corporate connections are at the core of our activities, especially through the active alumni network, a forerunner from a national perspective. The quality in our research is achieved via strong engagement in the international research community. In its educational programmes, the school has a long tradition of both internal and external internationalisation, with a comprehensive network of partner universities for student exchange, a nationally high proportion of international degree students and growing internationalisation in our research and teaching staff. The mandatory semester abroad lays the foundation for the students’ international competence. Like many leading international business schools, Hanken has deliberately chosen to function as a stand-alone business school. This brings challenges, but at the same time it allows flexibility to rapidly adapt to increasing international competition in research and education, and to the challenges and possibilities brought by a growing collaboration with the business world. In this respect, Hanken is unique in Finland. Hanken has been internationally accredited (EQUIS) since 2000. Hanken’s MBA programme was accredited by the International Association of MBAs (AMBA) in 2008. In 2008, the School also became the first university in Finland to sign the UN’s Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME, www. unprme.org).
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2015-06-12)
    Hanken School of Economics is a leading, internationally accredited business school in Finland. Hanken was founded more than a hundred years ago and is thus one of the oldest business schools in the Nordic region. Today, Hanken is a business school with clearly defined areas of strength: Economics, Finance, Management and Organisation, and Marketing. Hanken is a research-intensive business school where all education is research-based. Hanken has an international approach, where internationalisation and multilingualism increasingly permeate all areas of activity. The School offers the full range of academic degrees and executive education in both Helsinki and Vaasa. In order to maintain practical relevance in all activities, our corporate connections are at the core of our activities, especially through the active alumni network, a forerunner from a national perspective. The quality in our research is achieved via strong engagement in the international research community. In its educational programmes, the school has a long tradition of both internal and external internationalisation, with a comprehensive network of partner universities for student exchange, a nationally high proportion of international degree students and growing internationalisation in our research and teaching staff. The mandatory semester abroad lays the foundation for the students’ international competence. Like many leading international business schools, Hanken has deliberately chosen to function as a stand-alone business school. This brings challenges, but at the same time it allows flexibility to rapidly adapt to increasing international competition in research and education, and to the challenges and possibilities brought by a growing collaboration with the business world. In this respect, Hanken is unique in Finland. Hanken has been internationally accredited (EQUIS) since 2000. Hanken’s MBA programme was accredited by the International Association of MBAs (AMBA) in 2008. In 2008, the School also became the first university in Finland to sign the UN’s Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME, www. unprme.org).
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2016-08-10)
    In keeping with our long-term strategy of being an internationally recognised, competitive and research-intensive business school, Hanken has worked since 1999 to obtain international accreditations. In the autumn of 2015, Hanken obtained the AACSB-accreditation and achieved the long-term goal of being a so-called Triple Crown-business school. In 2015, Hanken also qualified for the Financial Times’ (FT) annual Masters in Management ranking. Hanken’s master’s programme was ranked 67th, an extremely good result considering that there are in total some 15 000 business schools in the world. This contributed to Hanken also being listed 76th in Financial Times’ ranking of the best business schools in Europe. Hanken´s investments in corporate responsibility and activities within the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) were recognized as Hanken was again elected member in the PRME Champions group. Hanken´s ambition to direct research investments towards quality over quantity using different incentives, for example through rewards that the Hanken Support Foundation hands out for top publications, has been successful. The first Hanken Research Day was organised in Helsinki during the autumn in order to further develop the research environment. Researchers shared their ideas and strengthened networks across both disciplinary and unit boundaries, improving collaboration within Hanken. The Hanken Research Day will have its counterpart in an annual teaching event, Hanken Teaching Day, which will be arranged in 2016 in Vaasa. During the year, Hanken launched a renewed programme portfolio of international master’s degree programmes. There are now fewer programmes, but students can choose from different orientation possibilities. With these renewals, Hanken looks to becoming more competitive in the international market for master’s degree programmes. Hanken´s organisation has undergone changes during the year regarding decreasing the number of subjects that can be chosen as a major subject within degree education. While remaining an important support subject at Hanken, Statistics is no longer an option as a major subject for Hanken students. Through taking these measures, Hanken is aiming to create a critical mass and divide its resources wisely among its areas of strength. During 2015, negotiations concerning structural cooperation were initiated between Arcada and Hanken, leading to an agreement on concrete forms of cooperation in 2016. One of these joint ventures is support for digitalisation. Digitalisation of Hanken´s activities has progressed within both teaching and administration during 2015. The goal is to share knowledge, create courses and optimise use of resources as well as to create digitalised services. Hanken will continue to pursue collaborations that offer resource-effective solutions, without compromising Hanken´s status as a stand-alone business school. Another investment that strengthened Hanken´s position as a stand-alone business school with activities in both Helsinki and Vaasa, was to buy the properties at both locations. This increased the university´s balance sheet total, which was already strong thanks to the successful Hanken 100 fundraising campaign and the returns from investments made. Hanken´s economy was stable in 2015 and thanks to investment activities the result showed a profit. The forecast for Hanken’s funding is, however, disquieting and the need for external financing is increasing. The ongoing HANKEN RETURNS fundraising campaign is very important for Hanken´s future. It gives me great pleasure that the campaign has continued successfully in 2015 and I wish that as many as possible will be able to participate before the campaign ends in 2017. As new Rector I took over a successful business school. Hanken´s success stems from the efforts of Hanken´s dedicated personnel together with our students, alumni, partners and our friends. A warm thank-you to all who have contributed and supported Hanken and our continuous and ongoing development! Karen Spens Rector, Professor
  • Günsberg, Marlene (Hanken School of Economics, 2016)
  • Günsberg, Marlene (Hanken School of Economics, 2017)
  • Günsberg, Marlene (Hanken School of Economics, 2018)
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-04-19)
    Finnish universities are just beginning to learn how to enhance their economy with externally raised funds. Such funding undoubtedly offers great opportunities for quality improvements, but there are both internal and external challenges involved. The external challenges include our own culture and traditions. In a Nordic welfare state, where reliance on direct state funding for e.g. health care and education has been substantial, companies and individuals are not used to financially support universities. Fortunately, the concept of external funding is gaining momentum in Finland, due to the promise of matching funds from the Finnish state. It really looks like things are hanging. For the sake of Finnish universities (i.e. maintaining their international competitiveness, a costly venture), let’s hope the change is permanent. The internal challenges are several: in most Finnish universities, alumni networks are weak or lacking, as well as being novice fund-raisers. Another challenge will also be the investment of the proceedings. Hanken has been very successful in overcoming both the external and internal obstacles, to a large degree due to our broad and active alumni network. We are now in the process of setting guidelines for our investment activities. Balancing between a good long-run return and avoiding excessive short-run volatility is not an easy task. Fortunately, our basic balance is sound. Still, in the future, for Hanken friends, there will be one more reason to check how the financial markets are doing.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-04-19)
    The financial crisis has changed the investor’s perception of many assets. Not only has the sound view that real estate assets, as risky assets, can not only go up but also down, returned. We have also been reminded that assets based on interbank debt are only as ‘risk-free’ as the banks themselves. Recently many previously high-rated countries lost their triple-A ratings, leading to chain reactions for financial intermediaries. But has the financial landscape changed in a fundamental way? The issues above are neither new nor contrary to financial theory, only consequences of revised perceptions on risk. At a recent Hanken finance alumni seminar, the “buyand- hold” investment strategy was discussed. While there is some current support for outperforming investment funds, there is – as before – ample evidence that the market efficiency concept is still alive, indirectly supporting long-term strategies. These are not aimed at tactically beating the market, but at harvesting risk premia in the long term. Hanken has an extensive investment strategy, and we look forward to obtaining returns on our investments both in faculty skills and learning environments, as well as on our financial portfolio.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-04-19)
    The recent parliamentary elections in Finland saw a flood of voices speaking against immigration / internationalisation. For a business school aiming at high-quality research as well as at educating business managers for the Finnish and international business communities, internationalisation is a must. Why? First, the obvious. Finland is a small, export-dependent country. Business is increasingly global. The days when firms could manage well by producing for the local market are definitely gone. Most new successful firms are now “born global”, i.e. focused on global markets from the very start. Managing international business requires knowledge of international markets as well as international contacts. Hanken is unique in Finland due to the language skills mastered by our students as well as our mandatory foreign exchange period. As a side effect, sending students abroad also internationalises our Helsinki and Vaasa campuses, since bilateral exchange agreements bring a fine mixture of international students from top schools to Hanken. Research, too, is international. To be on the front line requires the ability to communicate and interact with the international research community. We need to recruit internationally among top researchers, not just locally. Ideally, part of our faculty will be international, without jeopardizing our responsibility for education in Swedish in the business sector. Hanken is at the very beginning of this process, and great effort is needed to compete for business academics on the international job market .
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-04-19)
    Hanken has defined internationalisation as one of its focus areas. For a business school in a small, open economy, this is a natural choice. Recently, many steps towards greater international involvement have been taken, and the results are emerging. The number of international refereed publications per faculty has been steadily increasing, making Hanken the best producing business school in Finland in 2010. For 2011, this ratio has further improved. Our international recruitment activities and our actions to get the AACSB accreditation are expected to further speed up this process. Incentives have also been initiated to motivate papers in top publications. Finally, Hanken researchers have received important international acknowledgements, such as Professor Christian Grönroos’ recent appointment as a Legend of Marketing. Regarding student enrolment, we can note the increase in applications to our international Master’s programmes. And now, as the Bachelor programme students move out for their term abroad, we can also foresee a significant increase in the number of exchange students at the Helsinki and Vaasa campuses, further internationalizing our activities on home ground. Areas of improvement do, admittedly, remain. Our low international research funding is an Achilles’ heel for Hanken, and given its high impact on our state funding, it is imperative for our faculty to figure out how to improve our international applications. International recruitment also remains a challenge. But on a general level, we are well on our way, and more than ready to compete in an international environment.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-06-12)
    For a long time now on-going evaluation such as referee reviews, has been closely associated with the research activities of individual researchers. More recently, it has become increasingly common practice among universities (and other research organizations) to carry out research evaluations grading the level of research areas within universities. As the evaluations are conducted by committees consisting of academically distinguished researchers, they add to the external credibility of the evaluated institutions. This credibility-promoting feature is particularly valuable for small universities with a limited tradition of high-profile research with extensive international visibility. The research evaluations also make internal resource allocation more efficient. Successfully conducted research evaluations serve as a valuable independent and expert-based input for identifying particularly productive research projects and research areas within the organization.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-04-19)
    So here we are again. Just as the fear that the financial crisis of 2008 would turn out to be a “double-dip” was starting to fade, the markets fell. On the surface, this crisis looks different. This is not a question of defaults in complex instruments, but fear of country defaults in very simple instruments. There is, however, at least one similarity: banks are again involved. For many countries, saving Greece is mostly a question of saving their own national banks. It also seems different because now the countries that last time played a crucial role in supporting the financial system are themselves weaker. As a professor in Finance, I feel much more in the mist now; there don’t seem to be any neat solutions - only very tough ones. For higher education in Finland, these tougher times have meant cuts in public funding. It is unfortunate that the educational system, which would benefit from predictability and stability, has to live with the markets. Fortunately, thanks to our very successful fundraising campaign, Hanken has a robust balance sheet. So, despite the mist in the financial markets, we can look to the future with confidence.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-04-19)
    Design is with us at all times, and this year it has played a special role for many of us, not least because of Helsinki being the World Design Capital 2012. At Hanken, and to me personally, design entails many things, but I want to highlight two perspectives in particular. Firstly, we at Hanken focus on the design of our study programmes and service offerings, from bachelor to doctoral studies, and furthermore to executive education. This involves long-term development of content and learning methods, but it also requires a dynamic capability to create tailor-made solutions for our partners. Secondly, Hanken has hosted several international conferences this year. As it happened, the theme of the 28th EGOS (European Group for Organizational Studies) Colloquium 2012 in Helsinki was design. This conference brought almost 1,800 leading organisation scholars to Hanken and Aalto University to reflect upon the meaning of design in organisation theory and practice. As the former chairman of EGOS, and as a representative of one of the organisers, I felt really proud of Hanken. I believe this is what we want and need to do to remain as a leading international business school.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-04-19)
    Hanken defines itself as a research-based business school. Our focus is on high-quality international research, typically evidenced through publications in refereed, high Impact Factor journals. The competition in international research is tough, and the tools are limited: it is all about your faculty, and its incentives and possibilities for research. Lately we have seen a strengthening of the incentives to publish in top journals. Also in the recruiting new faculty, research quality has been in focus. Now we can see some of the fruit of our labours. During an accreditation visit to Hanken, we could present a list of our publications where our faculties have contributed. The list included top journals such as the American Economic Review, the Academy of Management Review, and the Journal of Financial Economics. According to the crude measure of refereed international publications per faculty, used by the Ministry of Education and Culture, Hanken has annually improved its score, scoring highest in 2010 among all universities with business education in Finland. We are happy for our current successes, but hopefully only in the beginning of the process towards an even higher research quality.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-04-19)
    During my years at Hanken, the subject that we now call Supply Chain Management and Corporate Geography (SCM&CG) has changed dramatically. Two focal areas have grown to become the core of the subject, humanitarian logistics and corporate responsibility. An award-winning conference paper in 2006 triggered international interest and led to the establishment of an international research network in humanitarian logistics (HL). Formalising the group, the Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Research Institute (HUMLOG Institute) was established between Hanken and the National Defence University (NDU) in 2008. Today, the institute serves as a global platform for HL research and the home for the first journal in the field, the Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management. The second research focus is corporate responsibility (CR) and sustainable development. While environmental management has been part of the focus of the subject since the 1960s, the research focus on it has been intensified since the end of the 1990s, and has come to include both the social and environmental aspects of corporate activity. While recognising CR as a cross-disciplinary field, the focus fits well within the traditional research themes of corporate geography through its emphasis on research on the localization process, interaction with the external environment, and managing increasingly complex supply chain relationships. Today Hanken offers a CR study module, and, while it is co-ordinated by SCM&CG, it essentially integrates courses from various other subjects at Hanken. What is more, it is offered as a module for students of the University of Helsinki – in return, SCM&CG students have access to logistics and geography courses at the university. It is within this module that the students, in their final work in the course CSR: From Principles to Practice, have the task of organising a panel debate – a debate that has this year attracted very prominent speakers, of which you can read more in this newsletter.
  • Unknown author (Hanken School of Economics, 2013-04-19)
    For the first time in its history Hanken School of Economics has commissioned an international committee with academically distinguished members to conduct a systematic evaluation of its research activities. This evaluation will serve as valuable independent and expert-based input for the research priorities of Hanken School of Economics, in particular for its policy with respect to areas of strength. The evaluation report makes a number of general recommendations on processes with potential to improve the productivity of the research activities at Hanken School of Economics. In these recommendations the committee emphasises the importance of 1) shared priorities in the organization as far as research ambitions are concerned, 2) a budget system which supports the incentives for research effort, 3) recruitment of international faculty, and 4) campus-related policies for securing a competitive PhD programme. The evaluation committee has reached the conclusion that four out of the evaluated ten research areas at Hanken School of Economics conduct research that meets the highest international standards. These four areas are Management & Organisation, Marketing, Finance and Economics. In addition, the research areas Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Supply Chain Management as well as Corporate Geography and Information Systems Science are classified as research areas with a potential to develop towards the highest level of international research. As far as Commercial Law is concerned, the committee considers one subarea, Intellectual Property Law (IP), to meet the highest international standards, whereas other subareas are weaker. The committee also identifies strong elements in the research conducted in Supply Chain Management and Corporate Geography and Information Systems Science. Only one research area, Statistics, was classified not to be internationally or nationally competitive. The report presents a detailed characterisation and assessment of the research conducted in all the areas under evaluation. It also incorporates some highly valuable suggestions for the future development of these research areas.