Books and serial publications

 

Books authored/edited by researchers at University of Helsinki / Publications of departments at University of Helsinki

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Recent Submissions

  • Jerman, Helena (Institute of Development Studies - University of Helsinki, 2016)
  • Jerman, Helena (Institute of Development Studies - University of Helsinki, 2003)
  • Nieminen, Hannu; Rahkonen, Keijo (University of Helsinki, Faculty of Social Sciences, 2016)
  • Joutsenvirta, Taina; Myyry, Liisa (Valtiotieteellisen tiedekunnan opetuksen kehittämispalvelut, 2016)
  • Kahlos, Maijastina (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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  • Salonen, Hannu (HECER, Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2016)
    HECER, Discussion Paper, No. 404
  • Gillanders, Robert; Neselevska, Olga (HECER, Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2016)
    HECER, Discussion Paper, No. 403
  • Huotari, Antti (HECER, Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2016)
    HECER, Discussion Paper No. 402
  • Diaz Bazo, Carmen; Haapakorpi, Arja; Särkijärvi-Martinez, Anu; Virtanen, Päivi (Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Departamento de Educación-Centro de Investigaciones y Servicios Educativos, 2015)
  • Kahlos, Maijastina (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
  • Kahlos, Maijastina (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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  • Kahlos, Maijastina (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
    20
  • Kivistö, Sari (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
    20
    My article has as its starting point the well-known ancient satirical work, L. Annaeus Seneca’s Divi Claudii apotheosis per saturam, also known as Apocolocyntosis Divi Claudii. Seneca’s satirical novel describes the death of the Emperor Claudius and his ascent to heaven where his request for deification is discussed by the gods. The gods decide to deny Claudius admission to Olympus, a decision followed by his expulsion and dispatch to the Underworld for his many crimes. My main concern is with the later Neo-Latin tradition: Seneca’s work inspired many imitators, including Erasmus of Rotterdam and Daniel Heinsius, who described other-worldly journeys, ascents to heaven or descents to the Underworld in the spirit of the genre. These later works included descriptions of the apotheoses of various authorities, (in)famous poets, emperors and allegorical figures. I will examine the functions of the apotheosis motif in the satirical literature written in imitation of Seneca, and I will show how the motif of the elevation into the divine status was used to ridicule authorities and examine conflicting value systems.
  • Tommasi Moreschini, Chiara O. (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    The present contribution provides an examination of the relationship between the emperor and the divine sphere in Latin panegyric poetry of the fifth and sixth centuries. Following the path magisterially set forth by Claudian, poets like Sidonius Apollinaris and, later on, Corippus employs the same literary genre to praise the newly-come Germanic kings or the Eastern Emperor. They have, however, to face a profoundly transformed historical and political realm, not to mention a different approach towards religion. Whereas Panegyrici Latini and Claudian could make wide use of mythological similes to celebrate Rome, her grandeur and the deeds of the emperor, his successors deal with the ancient gods in quite a clear-cut or, so to say, crystallized way. They show a conservative (and, to some extent, nostalgic) attitude and still believe in the endurance of Rome, which is fated to last eternally. The sacralization of Rome (with the concurring ideas of a Christian providence and the literary cliché of pagan aeternitas) is integrated within the frame of an empire that has become totally Christianized and, especially in the East, finds in political theology a privileged terrain to establish its roots. In particular the link between Christianity and the emperor as vicar of God is well outlined by the symbolism of court ceremonial and gesture, which panegyrics describe in great detail.
  • Humfress, Caroline (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    In the celebrated words of the Severan jurist Ulpian – echoed three hundred years later in the opening passages of Justinian’s Institutes – knowledge of the law entails knowledge of matters both human and divine. This essay explores how relations between the human and divine were structured and ordered in the Imperial codex of Theodosius II (438 CE). Deliberately side stepping vexed categories such as ‘Christian’, ‘pagan’, ‘heresiological’ etc., the essay self-consciously frames the question as one of ‘knowledge-ordering’ in order to develop a broader framework concerning relations between emperors and the divine. How was knowledge about the divine textualised in Book XVI of the Codex Theodosianus and with what implications for a late Roman imperial ‘ordering of knowledge’?