Books and serial publications

 

Books authored/edited by researchers at University of Helsinki / Publications of departments at University of Helsinki

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Recent Submissions

  • Rissanen, Jorma; Leppä-Aho, Janne; Roos, Teemu; Myllymäki, Petri (University of Helsinki, Department of Computer Science, 2016)
    Publication series B, Report B-2016-1
  • Rissanen, J; Harremoës, P; Forchhammer, S; Roos, T; Myllymäki, P (University of Helsinki, Department of Computer Science, 2015)
    Publication series B, Report B-2015-1
  • Harrison, Klisala (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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  • Harrison, Klisala (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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  • Moon, Jocelyn (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    This article investigates the growth of a small online learning community interested in matepe music, an mbira type traditionally played in Northeastern Zimbabwe and adjacent areas in Mozambique. I demonstrate how informal online learning has led to the development of participatory online spaces where new media and archival resources are shared and discussed. I put these activities in conversation with national arts policy and recent national and multinational online sustainability initiatives in order to highlight some of the advantages and insights that come from operating outside of a top-down framework. I aim to show the necessity of online and offline continuity by touching upon the ways in which online collaborative networks that are based on learning impact on-the-ground efforts of sustainability and repatriation.
  • Dargie, Dave (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    The Constitution on the Liturgy of the Second Vatican Council opened the way for the use of folk music in Catholic worship. The author’s work in African church music grew out of this. Lack of official policy for the conservation of Southern Africa’s musical heritage led the author to use opportunities arising from church music work to record and document traditional music. Later he was given the opportunity to bring traditional music into the syllabuses of the Fort Hare University music department. Although not a stated policy this clearly suited the post-apartheid university leadership. The article traces the work of the author in these fields.
  • Bleibinger, Bernhard (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    The emphasis of the Fort Hare music programs of the 1970s and 1980s was on Western music. It was only in 1998 that Dave Dargie introduced an innovative African syllabus – one that reflected the cultural background of the students and their specific, practical way of learning – by integrating traditional African music which was collected in the field and added to course content. At that time most of the students came from rural schools and hardly had any formal music training before registering at the university. The new BMus degree program, which was introduced in 2012 in East London, still follows Dave Dargie’s most fundamental ideas, namely: practical approaches and compulsory components of African music. Yet the needs, the demographic composition, and the schooling background of the student body at the department have changed since then, bringing new expectations and challenges with reference to the entrance level and career wishes of students, but also new opportunities for a young society.
  • Newsome, Jennifer (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    This article provides a case study from the Centre for Aboriginal Studies in Music (CASM), a specialist education provider and unique Australian Indigenous cultural institution for applied research, working in support of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander musicians and music at the University of Adelaide. The case study describes the founding philosophy, theoretical underpinning, policy framework, guiding principles and practical methodology of the work of CASM, with insights into inherent challenges in maintaining an Indigenous “cultural space” within a mainstream institutional setting, and the central importance, in such a setting, of collaborative and community-engaged policies and practices in working effectively for and with Indigenous musicians and stakeholder communities.
  • Boyu, Zhang (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    Following the UK-based model of The Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music (ABRSM), in 1993 the Central Conservatory of Music (CCOM) in Beijing initiated a similar system called the Standard Grade Examinations in Music (SGEM). Since then, throughout China, all conservatories as well as the Chinese Musicians Association, the Chinese National Orchestration Society and some local music organizations have launched similar examinations, establishing a significant trend in music education. A Grade Exams Center (GEC), which houses the SGEM, is not confined to exams, but also runs related courses in music instrument performance, and organizes relevant publications. This article focuses on the commercial aspects of the SGEM. It classifies four business categories that form a music-industrial chain, and discusses the chain’s benefits and issues for CCOM and Chinese society.
  • Swijghuisen Reigersberg, Muriel E. (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    This article explores the relationship between policy formation in higher education, ethics statements and ethical frameworks of professional conduct, within the discipline of ethnomusicology, from a UK and USA-based perspective. It will argue for an increased and sustained engagement with the formation of ethics statements on subjects of ethical concern and that this needs to be done through learned societies and critical mass. This, so I argue, will help inform UK and USA higher education institutions, funding bodies and sponsors on how best to approach the assessment of ethical rigour in ethnomusicological research activities. The article’s introduction will explain the 2015–16 context in which it was written, because the paper is designed to offer an historical snapshot of ethnomusicology’s engagement with ethical policy and is therefore time-sensitive. It will then explore ethnomusicological engagement with higher education’s ethical assessment processes and compare this to similar engagement by anthropologists. I examine the role of learned societies in promoting ethical conduct and policy formation by looking at ethical statements from both anthropological and ethnomusicological learned societies. Here I will show why it is important that ethnomusicological learned societies such as the British Forum for Ethnomusicology (BFE), Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM) and the International Council for Traditional Music (ICTM) provide sustained engagement with the ethical concerns of their discipline, using concepts of meta, normative and applied ethics. I conclude by providing examples of common ethical concerns that are not well-understood by medically-oriented ethics committees and offer suggestions as to how ethnomusicologists might engage with these.
  • Parent, Marie-Christine (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    Based on empirical research in the Seychelles islands (Indian Ocean), performed at the request of the Seychelles Ministry of culture, this article explores how the triangular relationship between the researcher, “interlocutors” (musicians and others), and government results in a particular form of knowledge production, one with restrictions, but also involving access otherwise unavailable to a foreign researcher. The author addresses the political economy of social science research in Seychelles and presents two case studies: (1) a course taught at the National Conservatoire of Performing Arts; and (2) the author’s involvement in an Intangible Cultural Heritage/UNESCO project. She discusses authorities and forces from the perspectives of values, and claims to an ethical stance taken in research, concluding that a comprehensive understanding of the actors, stakeholders and forces that influence the sustainability of music is imperative for (applied) ethnomusicologists working with the aim of assisting endangered music forms and traditions. A better grasp of the roles of ideas, beliefs and values inherent to musical practices and policy-making processes also contributes to a better understanding of music and culture, as well as the formulation of public policies.
  • Rothchild, Emily Joy (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    The Hamburg HipHop Academy is a city-supported institution, which uses hip-hop to socially integrate youths with migration backgrounds into the German nation-state. To progress upwards in the Academy’s hierarchical structure, youths build relationships with power-holders and peers, prove mastery of organizational norms, and conform their performance styles to the institution’s expectations. The Academy’s top-level Ensemble members act as cultural ambassadors for Germany through international exchanges. This article reveals how migrant hip-hoppers navigate the organizational politics of a German institution to become part of a “community of practice.” Effective self-advocates master the organization’s political structure through a process of micro-political integration. They learn a “shared repertoire” of actions, but these norms can inhibit youths’ opportunities to progress equally within the system and to express themselves fully. In order for a government-sponsored institution to help migrant youths integrate, all youths must be able to contribute to organizational and artistic decision-making processes.
  • Treloun, Sally (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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    This paper uses Klisala Harrison’s concept of an epistemic community as a methodology, in order to understand applied ethnomusicological research on Australian Aboriginal song. It will investigate the ways in which the goals and methods of applied research are informed by institutional recommendations that emanate from an Indigenous rights agenda and Australia’s colonialist past and present, and will consider how applied ethnomusicology has been supported by recent regulatory and funding environments. Framing repatriation and intercultural collaboration as sites of critical discourse, an epistemic community of applied ethnomusicology in Australia is theorized as a site of convergent, pluralistic practices that respond to: social and political determinants of music endangerment; and, aims and principles prescribed by institutional documents that set out priorities for and govern the ethical conduct and design of academic research.
  • Harrison, Klisala (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2016)
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  • Ledyayeva, Svetlana (HECER, Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2016)
    HECER, Discussion Paper, No. 405