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Now showing items 199-218 of 1452
  • Béhar, Henri (Tutkijakollegium, 2009)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies Across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Volume 5: Writing in Context: French Literature, Theory and the Avant Gardes / L'écriture en contexte : littérature, théorie et avant-gardes françaises au XXe siècle
  • Pihlström, Sami (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • McMahan, Jeff (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    19
  • Sehm-Patomäki, Katarina (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2013)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 14
    The present course of assessing debt sustainability – toward further econometric sophistication – risks being more harmful than helpful. To develop support for this claim, this paper first recounts what economic theory says about sovereign debt, and then continues by analysing the methodology and approach that the assessment of debt sustainability rests on today. Building on these accounts, this paper argues that debt sustainability should be lifted away from the narrow econometric seat where it is now found and, instead, should be placed in between problem debt on the one side and economic and social human rights on the other. The paper concludes by proposing an orderly framework promoting equal rights of debtor and creditor nations in debt negotiations. Importantly, it is up to the indebted nation to decide on the sustainability of its sovereign debt, not the creditors.
  • Gehrig, Thomas; Stenbacka, Rune (Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2007)
    Discussion Paper No 190
  • Vuorenmaa, Tommi A. (Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2008)
    Discussion Paper No 217
  • Leinius, Johanna (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2014)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 15
    There has been a veritable upsurge in the debate on cosmopolitanism not merely as a philosophical ideal but also as a socially grounded concept denoting an individual or collective stance towards world openness. Postcolonial scholars, however, have criticized new cosmopolitanism’s Eurocentric and universalizing stance. Pointing to the impossibility of global conviviality in a world in which non-Western epistemologies and cosmologies continue to be marginalized, they have challenged the exclusions and silences within the new cosmopolitan project. Decolonial scholars have also put forward cosmopolitanism as a decolonial political project challenging Western hegemony. These scholars have identified the World Social Forum as a privileged site for developing cosmopolitan projects. Overcoming the binary polarization between cosmopolitanism as imperial monologue or as privileged positionality of the subaltern, feminist scholar activists have developed knowledge-practices for dialogic encounters that offer a reading of cosmopolitanism as emancipatory self-transformation. This paper sketches the tensions and contradictions of the contemporary cosmopolitan debate in order to scrutinize the Inter-Movement Dialogues, a workshop methodology developed in the context of the World Social Forum process, as a way of grasping the contours but also ambiguities of embodied emancipatory cosmopolitanism.
  • Maliranta, Mika; Ilmakunnas, Pekka (Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2005)
    Discussion Paper No 85
  • Amacher, Gregory; Koskela, Erkki; Ollikainen, Markku (University of Helsinki, )
  • Murto, Pauli; Välimäki, Juuso (Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2009)
    Discussion Paper No 265
  • Gao, Maija; Hyytinen, Ari; Toivanen, Otto (Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2006)
    Discussion Paper No 122
  • Gao, Maija; Hyytinen, Ari; Toivanen, Otto (Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2005)
    Discussion Paper No 43
  • Kultti, Klaus; Salonen, Hannu (Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2009)
    Discussion Paper No 250
  • Thorup, Mikkel (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2013)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 14
    This article explores how state actors and ‘state philosophers’ from the latter part of the twentieth century until the present have described and reacted to what they perceive as militant challenges to the statist order. This is understood to be an antipolitical mode of argumentation because the critiques explicitly distance themselves from ordinary politics, portraying themselves as above or beyond normal politics. It is more specifically about critiques of liberal democracy for being unable to defend itself because it regards action as antithetical to talking. The article firstly outlines the core of the critique; then it turns to an empirical exploration of two different argumentative types of the critique illustrated through two different case examples: (1) securitized antipolitics: the neo-conservative argument for using force and the critique of those standing in the way of military solutions; and (2) moralized antipolitics: the idea that Islamism represents a new life threat to the West meriting a third world-war response and the critique of liberal appeasers supposedly not up to the challenge. The article concludes by summarizing the findings in the Slavoj Žižekian concept of ultrapolitics, where a militarization of politics is offered as real, hard politics but is actually a way to avoid the truly hard fact of politics: disagreement.
  • Lehmijoki, Ulla; Palokangas, Tapio (University of Helsinki, 2010)
    Discussion Paper No 642
  • Lehmijoki, Ulla; Pääkkönen, Jenni (Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2006)
    Discussion Paper No 136
  • Lehmijoki, Ulla (Helsinki Center of Economic Research, 2004)
    Discussion Paper No 32
  • Lehmijoki, Ulla (University of Helsinki, 2004)
    Discussion Paper No 610
  • Hentilä, Seppo (Suomen historiallinen seura, 1979)
    111