Accounting for the Persistence of Widespread Child Labour Amidst High Economic Growth Rates in post-1991 Economic Reform India including a Case Study of Karur District, Tamil Nadu

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/10550
Title: Accounting for the Persistence of Widespread Child Labour Amidst High Economic Growth Rates in post-1991 Economic Reform India including a Case Study of Karur District, Tamil Nadu
Author: Sallinen, Maarit
Contributor: University of Helsinki
Thesis level: Master's thesis
Abstract: General objective of the study is try to understand and explain as of why the child labour persists in India amidst the high economic growth rates experienced in the post-1991 economic reform era. The examination has a dual focus. At first, the nature of economic growth in the post-1991 reform period is studied in terms of its ability to reduce the supply and demand factors that cause child labour. Poverty reduction, economic inequalities, social sector expenditure and changes in the production structure of the economy are in the main focus. Second, the aim is to analyse the impact of Indian social structure in the post-1991 reform period on the persistence of child labour. Finally, a case study of Karur district in Tamil is used to compliment the analysis. The methods of qualitative research are applied and as such the thesis will not attempt to provide accurate quantitative interrelationships between factors that cause child labour in India but rather to provide explanations and proposals as of why this might be. The study and the case study shows that in terms of its impact on eradication of child labour, the impact of ten years of gradualist economic reforms sends a mixed picture. Poverty reduction has been uneven with great disparities between states and regions, in particular the disparities between rural and urban areas persist. Even as economy has been booming, many public services have worsened. In some sectors there has been impressive progress made but the differences in terms access to these services along caste and regional lines are remarkable. The development in provision of public services such as education and health care also suffer from regional and sectoral bias. In terms of education, for a developing country India still spends far more money on tertiary education than on primary education. The growth of industrial production requires educated labour force, therefore improving the quality of education would be essential for the future of India.The economic growth in India has in particular fuelled the capital-intensive sectors, at the expense of the labour-intensive industries which would bring employment and incomes for the poor. Agricultural sector has suffered from lack of government investments. In addition to these factors, and probably in part behind all these factors are the social and cultural factors. Most of the child workers of India belong to the Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes or to the Muslim community. Despite the fact that economic growth in India proceeds, caste-based discrimination continues in India and access to education and social status are still determined by the individuals caste status. The case study of rural Karur district confirms many of these notions.
Description: Endast sammandrag. Inbundna avhandlingar kan sökas i Helka-databasen (http://www.helsinki.fi/helka). Elektroniska kopior av avhandlingar finns antingen öppet på nätet eller endast tillgängliga i bibliotekets avhandlingsterminaler.Only abstract. Paper copies of master’s theses are listed in the Helka database (http://www.helsinki.fi/helka). Electronic copies of master’s theses are either available as open access or only on thesis terminals in the Helsinki University Library.Vain tiivistelmä. Sidottujen gradujen saatavuuden voit tarkistaa Helka-tietokannasta (http://www.helsinki.fi/helka). Digitaaliset gradut voivat olla luettavissa avoimesti verkossa tai rajoitetusti kirjaston opinnäytekioskeilla.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/10550
Date: 2008-05-12
Subject: taloudellinen kasvu
lapsityö
Intia
India
child labour
economic growth
social change
21st Century


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