Browsing by Subject "Acacia mangium"

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  • Atipanumpai, Ladawan (The Society of Forestry in Finland - The Finnish Forest Research Institute, 1989)
    Results are reported from studies on variation in growth characteristics, foliar nutrient concentration, phyllode anatomy and stomatal frequency of 16 different sources in a provenance trial in Thailand. Family variation and heritability of growth and flowering frequency were calculated for 20 open-pollinated families at the age of 28 months. In laboratory studies, transpiration rate, leaf conductance and leaf water potential were measured for different soil moisture regimes. Responses of photosynthesis, photorespiration and dark respiration, and CO2 compensation point were assessed in relation to temperature and irradiance. Recommendations are made for the selection of A. mangium provenances for planting in Thailand.
  • Niskanen, Anssi; Luukkanen, Olavi; Saastamoinen, Olli; Bhumiphamon, Suree (The Society of Forestry in Finland - The Finnish Forest Research Institute, 1993)
    The profitability of fast-growing trees was investigated in the northeastern and eastern provinces of Thailand. The financial, economic, and tentative environmental-economic profitability was determined separately for three fast-growing plantation tree species and for three categories of plantation managers: the private industry, the state (the Royal Forest Department) and the farmers. Fast-growing tree crops were also compared with teak (Tectona grandis), a traditional medium or long rotation species, and Para rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) which presently is the most common cultivated tree in Thailand. The optimal rotation for Eucalyptus camaldulensis pulpwood production was eight years. This was the most profitable species in pulpwood production. In sawlog production Acacia mangium and Melia azedarach showed a better financial profitability. Para rubber was more profitable and teak less profitable than the three fast-growing species. The economic profitability was higher than the financial one, and the tentative environmental-economic profitability was slightly higher than the economic profitability. The profitability of tree growing is sensitive to plantation yields and labour cost changes and especially to wood prices. Management options which aim at pulpwood production are more sensitive to input or output changes than those options which include sawlog production. There is an urgent need to improve the growth and yield data and to study the environmental impacts of tree plantations for all species and plantation types.