Volume 19: Death and Mortality: From Individual to Communal Perspectives

 

COLLeGIUm’s 19th volume discusses mortality at the communal and personal levels of experience. The volume “Death and Mortality” emerges from the Human Mortality project (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies 2011-2013), which provided a framework for discussing death, dying and mortality in an interdisciplinary network. This volume brings together, in particular, anthropological, philosophical, theological and historical perspectives. The writers - including Douglas Davies, Jeff McMahan, Kathryn Edwards and many others - discuss how (good/bad) death can be defined, understood and experienced in different cultural, political, social and historical contexts

Recent Submissions

  • Unknown author (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Unknown author (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • McMahan, Jeff (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Pajari, Ilona (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
    From ancient warriors through to the Crusaders, all the way to the modern citizen soldier, death in war has been praised as the most glorious death. All modern nations have harnessed this image for their own use to some extent. Nationalism has been claimed to have replaced older belief systems like religion, yet it itself has had and still has many transcendental features. In this article I consider a very special form of this ideology, the logic of sacrifice. Finland during the Second World War is particularly in focus. The logic of sacrifice as a coherent ideology is typical of war-faring nations, yet it has lost some of its relevance since the Second World War. It is also useful in tying women and children to the nation’s struggle. It promises to give meaning to every soldier’s death as well as consolation to mourning families. In reality it was often only a partial aid. Yet the entire nation adjusted its mourning practises to the idea that the fallen were the most important dead and that, for example, civilian losses were considered only secondary compared to them.
  • Lenkewitz, Anna (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Ronikonmäki, Hanna (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Pihlström, Sami (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Heinämaa, Sara (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Edwards, Kathryn (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Yurchak, Alexei (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Lizza, John P. (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Esser, Andrea Marlen (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Davies, Douglas J. (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
  • Hakola, Outi (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2015)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 19
    COLLeGIUm’s 19th volume discusses mortality at the communal and personal levels of experience. The volume “Death and Mortality” emerges from the Human Mortality project (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies 2011-2013), which provided a framework for discussing death, dying and mortality in an interdisciplinary network. This volume brings together, in particular, anthropological, philosophical, theological and historical perspectives. The writers - including Douglas Davies, Jeff McMahan, Kathryn Edwards and many others - discuss how (good/bad) death can be defined, understood and experienced in different cultural, political, social and historical contexts